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Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 3,057 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1878

SHAVINGS. A REPORT of the following conversation, between a young lady, and one of Brown's last year's graduates, who contemplates teaching history and English literature as soon as a position offers, has been received : She; —"Mr. I've just been reading Locksley Hall, is it not charming?" He; —"I have never read it. To tell the truth I don't admire poetry. Ido so much reading that I only seek to get the analysis of the thoughts, without striving to remember any set phraseology, and read prose almost exclusively." She ; —(trying to find out what prose he reads) "Have you read James T. Field's ' Underbrush? He; —"No, I have never read any of Mr. Field's poetry." She ; —(surprised .) " Well you enjoy reading Charles Dudley Warner's writings, of course ?" He ; —" No, as I said before, I read very little poetry, and when I read any, I read Shakespeare or some of the other standard poets and seldom look at the works of the more obscure poets." Young lady remarks on the weather. PHILOSOPH...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 March 1878

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. 11. NEW YORK, MARCH ist, 1878. No. II Board of Editors, 1877-1878. FREDERICK W. HOLLS, '7B) Editor-in-Chief, J. FISCHER, '7B, S. of L. Managi?ig Editor. J. W. SPALDING, '7B- C. H. CROW, '7B. H. G. PAINE, '79. W. B. PARSONS, JR. '79. C. D. STARR, 'BO S. of M. M. BENJAMIN, '7B S. of M. S. B. POND, '791 Secretary. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, - $2.00. Single copies, - - - - - - 1 5 cts - Subscriptions by mail should be addressed to MR. WM. F. MORGAN, Treasurer, 634 Fifth Avenue, New York. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 March 1878

CURRENT TOPICS. IN the absence of exciting topics in our own college, the troubles at Princeton have lately been the subject of much discussion, and we are glad to state that public opinion among our undergraduates was unanimous against the rebellious students. It is, indeed, a significant fact, that at the pre-eminently religious college of New Jersey, revolvers, clubs, and bull-dogs, seem to belong to the required instruments of study, and that whole classes are ready to protect two or three ruffians who receive their due. We cannot discuss the merits of the present case, but this we certainly believe, that the forty-two suspended or expelled students richly deserved their fate, and that they should be followed by every man in the college who countenances the brutal custom of " hazing." As long as this abominable practice is tolerated in any college, that college does not deserve, and, in fact, will not be attended by gentlemen. The promptness with which the Faculty at Princeton d...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Oratory at Columbia. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 March 1878

Oratory at Columbia. THE last Semi-Annual exhibition suggests some reflections on the study of Oratory as pursued at Columbia, which lead to the conclusion that it is sadly inadequate. In freshman year the newly fledged collegians occupy a part of the already crowded Rhetoric hour in spouting their old school declamations, receiving such brief criticism as their instructor can spare time to make. On the whole the declamations are slightly better at the end of the year than at the beginning. But surely it requires little confidence to speak before a score or so of ones classmates, and a voice would indeed be weak which could not fill the limited extent of Dr. Quackenbos's recitation room. Small improvement is noticed in sophomore year. To be sure the declamations are delivered before the whole class, and occupy an hour set apart for that exercise, but even now the room is too small, and as the class is under a different instructor, the orations are but a repetition of those delivered...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE RANK OF DISTINGUISHED MEN. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 March 1878

THE COLLEGE RANK OF DISTINGUISHED MEN. NUMBER 1. " The marksman who aims at the whole target will seldom hit the centre." " We should guard against a talent which we cannot hope to practise in perfection. Improve it as we may, we shall always, in the end, when the merit of the master has become apparent to us, painfully lament the loss of time and strength devoted to such botching. GOETHE. " There is no adaptation or universal applicability in man ; but each has his special talents." A writer in one of the magazines* has made a laudable attempt to prove : FIRST— That "it is seldom that a scholar of low rank has succeeded in attaining great emienence before the world ; " and SECONDLY —That " the large majority oi graduates who have become distinguished by the work ot their life were, in college, scholars of the highest rank. By this he evidently means those of general excellence and highest marks, although where his literary examples were lacking in these he spoke ot class-poems and ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
COLUMBIA'S BOATING RECORD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 March 1878

COLUMBIA'S BOATING RECORD. THE rowing fever which started among other colleges in '7l took hold of Columbia early in '73. The spark being fanned into a flame by the generous allowance from the trustees, two delegates were sent | to the convention held on April 2nd, at New Haven. This was Columbia's first entry into the rowing world. Our first race was the third regatta of the Association rowed at Springfield, on July 17th. Eleven crews started, but as that was the year of the celebrated diagonal line, there was no official placing, except for the first three: Yale, Wesleyan, Harvard; then probably followed Amherst, Columbia, Cornell, in the order named. Our representatives were: Moore (bow), Smith, Simmonds, Rapallo, Cornell, Rees (stroke). The next year '74, saw the last three men in their respective seats with Timpson, Goodwin, Griswold as bow, 2 and 3. The course picked for the race was Saratoga, and the date July 15th,. But on account of storms it was not till the 18th that the ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 March 1878

CORRESPONDENCE. WHY THE GOODWOOD CUP WAS ABOLISHED. Mr. Spectator: — AS the abolition of the Goodwood Cup has attracted considerable attention from the students and friends of Columbia College, I take the opportunity offered by the letter signed " Justitia," which appeared in the SPECTATOR of Feb. Ist, to present the reasons which induced the class ot '79 f° decide upon a discontinuance of the custom. The subject has been more or less discussed ever since the remarks made at the last Goodwood presentation. The election of '7B was not the only hotly contested choice on record—witness the cases of '6B and '74. The honor was the highest in the gift ol the class, and has too often been sought after, if not gained by means which in themselves rendered the candidate unworthy of honor or esteem. Society influence has interfered, compromises have been effected, and candidates have stooped to ignoble compliances with the tastes and wishes of others. Whether or not the abolition ot the Goodwo...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 March 1878

OUR EXCHANGES. THE Harvard Lampoon, No. i, Vol. 5, is before us. It has a laughable description of the meeting of Pius IX and Victor Emanuel on the road to Purgatory or He . We will give the Pope s own explanation of his infallibility: "Well, you see, said His Holiness, in some confusion, "When I was on earth 1 was infallible—that is to say, I never did the wrong thing. But the way in which I managed it was by never doing anything in particular." Lampvmeets them and does not tell them which way to go. 1 he—what do you call it—by name "An Accidental Pickup," contains more slang than wit, yet has some good points. There is still room for improvement. Altogether we have seen better numbers than the last. THE subject of distinguished men in college seems to be agitating very generally the college press. We print this editorial from the Amherst Student because it considers the subject in a new light: " It has been discovered in the case of some men, who after graduation have been found g...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 March 1878

ABOUT COLLEGE. THE class of 'Bl has elected the following officers for the second term : Reginald H. Sayre, - - President. Charles A. Moran, - - Vice-President. Eugene T. Stuart, - - - Secretary. Erastus T. Roberts. - - Treasurer. Harry T. Peck, - - - Historian. THE Second Term has at length begun in good -earnest. BUT two months ot college work remain tor the Seniors. They leave May 3d, and are examined May 13th —21 St. THE Columbiad of '79 will be ready about April Ist. STUDENTS should remember that the statute torbidding any one who is on the grounds to leave before the third hour without excuse, applies (according to the interpretation of the Faculty) to the time before chapel in the morning. Non-observance of this rule is a safe method of obtaining an involuntary vacation. PEITHOLOG. has elected the following officers for the term : Marlborough Churchill, '77, President; Theo. B. Foster, '7B, Vice-President; Henry S. May, 'Bo, Secretary ; William L. Robb, 'BO, Treasurer; Solomo...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
IN "THE MINES." [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 March 1878

IN "THE MINES." ELEMENTS OF GEOLOGY, A Text-book for Colleges and for the General Reader. By Joseph Le Conte, Professor of Geology and Natural History in the University of California. New York : I). Appleton & Cos. 1878. 588 pp. Price, $4.00. The geology of the United States has of late years been so much explored and talked about in the scientific world at large, —and this is due chiefly to the expeditions which have been sent out by the Government requiring the services of such men as Hayden, Newberry, Leidy, Cope, and other scientists equally eminent, — that it is with special pleasure that we have read this latest contribution by Prof. Le Conte. Pie defines geology " as the history of the earth and its inhabitants as revealed in its structure, and as interpreted by causes still in operation." With this definition in mind the author first treats of the surface of the earth as modified by the action of the atmosphere, aqueous, igneous, and organic agencies. These influ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 March 1878

THE COLLEGE WORLD Amherst:— The works of Boccaccio, Rabelais,, and that class of writers, are practically inaccessible ta the students, although in the library. Two attempts have been made, within the last year, to have dramatic entertainments given by the students. Both have failed because the faculty was unpropitious. Gas is to be introduced into Alexandria. Holyoke has formed a base-ball association with a capital stock of $l,OOO. The time of service at the college church has been changed from 2:15 to 3 : r 5. p. m. Alexandria has revised her constitution and reduced her fees to ft per term. President Seelye has lately been made a member of the Philosophical Society of Great Britain, Stewart L. Woodford, of New York, is to give the address before the Social Union, Commencement. The attendance of the Juniors at the literary societies, has increased 150 per cent, since the Junior class debates commenced. Considerable religious interest is being manifested throughout the college, an...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE LIBRARY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 March 1878

THE LIBRARY. A HISTORY OF ENGLAND IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. Dy William Edward Hartgrole Leckey. 2 vols. Bvo. XX., 626 and XVI. 699 pp. Cloth. New York. D. Appleton & Cos. Price, $5.00. England in the eighteenth century presents the greatest possibilities to the historian. It is a promissing field, with as yet but very few occupants. It is the England of Marlborough, of Walpole, of Chatham, of Burke, of Pitt, —the England of Addison, Pope, Sacheverell, Fielding, Richardson, Johnson, Gibbon, Reynolds, Garrick, and Sheridan. It comprises the reigns of Anne and the Georges, the Continental campaigns,—Blenheim, the Jacobite Revolution, '• Prince Charley's" campaign, the alliance with Frederick the Great, the American War for Independence, and the French Revolution. The century was for England, one of quiet, orderly and peaceful developments, pregnant with mighty events. It had no striking epoch, like the Reformation in the Fifteenth, —the Revolution in the Seventeenth Centur...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 March 1878

SHAVINGS. THE other evening a Junior was entertaining a rural Soph, with an account of his enjoyment of a recent oratorio, when the Soph, wisely enquired, "Ah, did you deliver an oration on that evening?" Junior swoons. ONE of the dignified Seniors sat down the other day and wrote on the back of a couple of postal cards. Then he turned them over and directed them, but bysome mischance placed the address on the wrong cards. The result was, a shirt manufactory in New Orleans got a very polite invitation to go buggy-riding, while his sweetheart was made ferocious by receiving the following: " Please send me a sample of the stuff your shirts pro mndo of."— Ex.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 March 1878

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. 11. NEW YORK, MARCH 15th, 1878. No. 12. Board of Editors, 1877-1878. FREDERICK W. HOLLS, '7B, Editor-in-Chief, CHARLES H. CROW, '7B, Managing Editor. J. W. SPALDING, '7B. J. FISCHER, '7B, S. of L. H. G. PAINE, '79- W - B - PARSONS, JR. '79. C. D. STARR, 'BO S. of M. M. BENJAMIN, '7B S. of M. S. B. POND, '79, Secretary. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, ... - $2.00. Single copies, - - - - - - 1 5 cts * Subscriptions by mail should be addressed to MR. WM. F. MORGAN, Treasurer, 634 Fifth Avenue, New York. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 March 1878

CURRENT TOPICS. THE Legislature is considering the bill to abolish the City College. While, in the abstract, the continuance of this institution can hardly be defended, there is no doubt that it supplies a practical want, and supplies it well. It is not at all in derogation t»f the City College that we say it appeals to a public totally different from the one which sends its sons to Columbia; it is a plain fact that this is the case. Though this public could, undoubtedly, support the College without aid from the city, it is doubtful whether such a change could be effected without very great inconvenience and loss to individuals. Moreover, the college can hardly be said to be a burden to the city, and if every sum expended by municipal authorities were as well husbanded as the appropriation for education, New York City would, to-day, be a happier corporation. In the abstract, the State ceitainly should afford all within its borders equal privileges, and it can hardly be said to do th...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
A THEORY OF SLOPES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 March 1878

A THEORY OF SLOPES. IN glancing over a very curious old book, called Analytical Geometry, the following strange and unintelligible expression meets our eye: "If the slope is negative, D. P. is to be laid off downward." Negative and downward being in italics to show that they are the least intelligible words in the sentence. Now I suppose that even Freshmen know what slope means, so I will waste no time in defining that but too well understood term. However, a negative slope is a very different thing, and can only be fully comprehended after a very careful analysis. The matter is further compli- cated by the initials U. P. which are apparently cribbed from the " Scheme of Attendance," but which we will consider hereafter. Now a slope as we alt know is a very nefarious proceeding, still it is one for which none of us are likely to test the veracity of Col. Bob Ingersoll's theories. But a negative slope must be a very much more deadly affair. In fact I am very seriously of opinion that...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 March 1878

OUR EXCHANGES. TT would seem that the desire for reform has crept, -L at last, from politics into the most conservative in- , stitutions in existence, the college. Almost every week : some paper touches on a new grievance, and pleads tor ' reform in that particular. Many papers are quite content to follow in the wake ot their more enterprising compeers, and to treat of subjects suggested by some ! one else. The Wittenberger, for March, breaks over I this established custom and takes up an entirely new subject. As the article is good, and not too long we ; give it entire. "Wearily indeed would the hours ot recitation pass with some students were it not tor the opportunity afforded for a display of supposed information in regard ; to the various topics presented in the class-room. It ! certainly should be the aim and desire of every one to answer all questions correctly and to manifest perfect familiarity with the assigned lesson, but when an individual undertakes to impart informatio...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 March 1878

ABOUT COLLEGE. A MEETING was held March sth, to consider the formation of a Columbia Base Ball Association. Mr. F. S. Bangs, '7B, was called to the chair, and Mr, L. N. Phelps, 'BO, was chosen Secretary pro /em. At that meeting Messrs. Spalding. '7B, Lynch, '79, and Smith, 'Bl, were appointed a committee to draw up any needful rules for the government of the Association. Messrs. Mulchahey/79, Waterbury.'So, and Torrey,'Bi, were appointed a committee on grounds. The meeting then adjourned to meet Tuesday, March 12th. At the second meeting, March 12th, the committee reported progress, and the matters were relerred back again, with a request to have their report ready for a meeting to be held Monday, March 18th. A motion for the enrollment of all who wished to join such an association was carried. The meeting then adjourned to meet again Monday, March 18th, at 1 P. M. All are invited to attend. THE Trustees have given a leave of absence to President Barnard, after the fifteenth of Apri...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
IN "THE MINES." [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 March 1878

IN "THE MINES." AT a recent meeting of the faculty it was resolved that the students of the second year pursuing the chemistry course shall not be required to take drawing in their second term. This caused great satisfaction not only amongst the students mentioned but the whole class appreciated the injustice of compelling a prospective chemist to acquire a knowledge of shade and shadow construction. We would be the last to allow that any knowledge is useless ; nevertheless we are convinced that one man can not learn everything and that it is far better for a graduate to be a thorough chemist than to have a superficial smattering of all the branches taught in the school. The faculty have been slow to comprehend this and as a consequence the different courses have till this year had too much in common, but their recent decree is one step in the right direction and another was made when they resolved that one term's work in blow-piping was sufficient for the civh engineering students....

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 March 1878

THE COLLEGE WORLD. Amherst: — Prof. Emerson is arranging in the cases of the Hitchcock Society of Inquiry the Anthropological specimens hitherto scattered about in the different collections belonging to the college. The Sawyer -prizes in Anatomy and Physiology have been awarded to the Seniors. The first game with Harvard will be played on Blake Field, May 29, and the second at Cambridge, June 12. Amherst will meet Yale at New Haven June 4, and the return game will be played on Blake Field, June 22. The different classes have responded liberally to the call for money for Base Ball expenses. A boarding club of 13 Freshmen has raised over $lOO for Base Ball. There were no college exercises Washington's Birthday. The Seniors have all sat for their class pictures. President Seelye presented thirty valuable books to the Easthampton Library last year. The Seniors have comparative Anatomy under the Doctor for the rest of the term. The Senior Hyde Orations and Junior Prize Essays must be han...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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