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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 77 AN IMPORTANT EVENT. Catholic Indian Bureau Recently Reorganized. It Has Charge of the Work of the Church Among the Indians 4,000 Indian Children in Catholic Schools. From tbo Catholic Columbian Ail event of Catholic history which would seem to merit more than the brief notice accorded it by the press dis patches, is the recent leorganization of the Catholic Indian Bureau, which, by the way, completes this year the twen tieth one of its existence, it having been first established by Abp. Bayley of Baltimore, on the recommendation of those prelates who have Indian missions within their diocese, for the purpose of representing to the Govern ment the needs and designs of such prelates regarding the education of the Indian children committed to their care, as well as the spiritual supervision of their elders. The thing that did most, perhaps, to induce these prelates to prefer such a request to Abp. Bayley was a passage that occurred in the message which General G...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

75 Titt? IJSDIAN ADVOCATE. ilH niiryrin listening to the representations of such priests as Father Brouillet, Van Gorp, S. J., Deshon, O.S.P., all of whom had experience with the Indians, together with several others, came to the con clusion that the appointment of a Catholic Indian agent, who should reside at Washington, was the best remedy for the occasion; and named for that position January 2, 1874, the still lamented General Charles Ewing. This first Catholic Indian agent, taking up his residence at the national capital, at once entered on the discharge of his duties, but before many months he became convinced that, in order to have the rights of the Catholic Indian properly protected, it was absolutely necessary that some priest, thoroughly acquainted with missionary work, should also come to Washington and co-operate with him. He put his conviction in this matter before Abp. Bayley and the other pre lates, and the result was that the Very Rev. J. B. Brouillet, then Vicar-Gene...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 79 - cious effects of Gen. Grant's policy in dealing with the Indians, was to practically exclude Catholic priests from all but the eight agencies which had been assigned to the Catholics during his administration. The bureau won its first signal success during the term of his successor, President Hayes, when, believing that the time had come for it to act, it petitioned the Interior De partment, in June, 1880, that, as under the national constitution, every Chris tian church had the right to exercise its ministry whenever and wherever such ministry was desired, the exclusion of Catholic priests from any Indian agency should not be permitted. Recognizing the force of this argument, the administration issued an order that thereafter, exception made of places, where the presence of rival religious organizations would imperil the main tenance of peace and order, Indian reservations should be open to all religious denominations. Under this just ruling, the Catholic ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

mmmmmmmmmmm 80 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. of God from the school education of children has necessarily brought with it a practical elimination also of the ideas of authority and of duty. It is all very well for grown men and women to say that the symbolism of religion and of God is not necessary to them, in whom the ideas of authority and of duty imbibed at home in their childhood have grown with their growth, and strength ened with their practical experience of life. But how is it with little children? Is it safe for them to dispense with the object lessons of this symbolism, either at home or in the school? And, above all, is it safe in the case of children that the symbolism which at home their mothers teach them to revere should bo derided and ignored at the school? Pope Leo XIII., and the Catholic clergy of Italy and France, have seen for years past, and for years past they have protested, in season and out of season, against the perils involved in the practical expulsion from the fi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

f m " t l THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 81 effect of the ferocious versification of Victor Hugo upon a British clergyman of presumably sound mind, what must have been the effect of 'Les Chatiments' upon the undisciplined intellect and character of a young journeyman baker from Lombardy, possessed with the belief that all chief magistrates alike, Kings, Emperors, and Presidents, are the natural enemies of labor and, therefore, wild beasts who may be slain, not only with tranquillity, but with a noble consciousness of a great duty solemnly performed ?" A telling point is made by the Sun's correspondent in the portions of his article we have quoted. He shows that godless literature, as well as godless schools, sow the seeds of anarchy. The Catholic Church recognizes this fact. She is ever striving to rescue mankind from these two dangers. If France and other countries that are threatened by the disciples of disorder heed the Church's advice it will be impossible for anarchy to thrive in them. S...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

82 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. land is their own, and naturally again, they take more interest in their work and become more ambitious to do well. Before, a Choctaw could get no rations on credit unless a white man went security for him (which, by the way, was a pretty expensive way of buying goods), now there are several Choctaws who can get their goods just as well as any white man. A few more words about the plan that has been followed in establishing this mission. The success may be at tributed especially to two points : 1. The Bishop bought land to settle the Indians around church and school. Beginning with 600 acres the mission now has 2,037 acres. Every family gets 15 acres, free of rent. If they are industrious, they can get more land at a nominal rent. With the crops they raise on their land and with work that they do on the farms around, they can make a decent living. In this way also they are, so to say, in daily contact with the priest and the Sisters, which is of great advanta...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 83 answered, modestly. "After a few decades I am sure to feel refreshed both in body and in mind." A STRIKING CONTRAST. One of the most striking differences between the Anglo-Saxon civilization of the continent and that of other peoples is seen in their respective Indian poli cies. What has become of the Indians amongst the Anglo-Saxon people ? Where he has not been exterminated, he has remained in the whole a brutal savage, worse even than when the white man forced him in the beginning. On the other hand, amongst the Spanish and French, the Indian has been treated with humanity and consideration, Christianized, civilized and educated, the Indian population in these regions even greater than originally. On the other hand the Anglo-Saxon has per sistently robbed, brutalized and exter minated him. Here is a striking contrast, worth considering. Why is it? The answer is not far to seek, because the Spanish and French methods of dealing with the Indians was animated...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

84. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. TlMq Indian Advocate Is a Review, published by the lleuedictinc Fathers of the Indian Territory, to plead the cause of the last remnants of the Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe ; their progress in education and religion ; their occupa tions, industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, n history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not be found in any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart Post Ofllce, Oklahoma Territory. Approved by Right Rev. THEO. MEERSCHAERT, Vicar ArosTouc of Oklahoma and Indian Territory. Subscriptions 60 Cents per Year. Single Copies 15 Cents. OCTOBER, 1894. EDITORIAL AND LOCAL. Calculating hypocrites are ever minus essential factors. This is the month of the Holy Rosary. Novenlber is calle...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 85 those who are rudo to you. For remem ber, that you show courtesy to others not because they are gentlemen, but because you are one." Time to me this truth has taught ('Tis a treasure worth revealing) : More oflend by want of thought Than by any want of feeling. The Mohawk Indians will not allow so much as a blade of grass to grow on the graves of their companions. In the days of Columbus only seven metals were known to exist. Now there are fifty-one. The Advocate is profoundly grateful for the many words of praise from various sources that have come to it lately. A Prayer for the Conversion of Unbelievers. 0 Holy Spirit of Truth, we beseech Thee to en lighten the minds of unbelievers in the midst of us, to incline their hearts to Thy word, and to believe the teaching of Thy Church ; give them courage to accept the faith and openly profess it ; that they may come into union with Thee and the Father, through Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth forever and ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

86 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. out knowing a word of each other's language, these two Catholics were able, by signs and the universal brotherhood of the Church, to know one, another as friends. To write a note to the man at whose house the travelers had stopped the night before was short work. To explain by signs what was wanted was not so easy, but finally the Indian understood and accepted the errand. It was then past noon, and the dis tance thirty miles, yet this Catholic Indian reached the party again before setting out the next morning, and he brought the coat with him. PROSPERITY CHRISTIANS. It is said that adversity is the true test of a man's heroism, genius and character. It is in prosperty that one's ambitions, comforts and pleasures are gatified, and the smoother and brighter side of his nature is exposed to view. In adversity the curtain is, as it were, drawn aside, as then we behold the man in his real character. It is as 'true in spiritual as in temporal matters. Many Christi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

V1 "i1 ppn-''"" ipr ' TZTE INDIAN aWoGATE. 87 and seemed to labor so generously to maintain. His professions and labor were those of a hypocrite ; his contri butions money invested where he thought it would do the most good in advertising him among the church members and bringing him their custom. In prosperity he would continue it; but adversity which requires sacrifice, he refuses and resists even to placing himself and family outside the pale of the church. But, while prosperity has thus perverted men, and caused them to abandon the church, it is in adversity that true Christian faith is manifested. Man, generally, is careless, thoughtless, and at times defiant of religion during prosperity and pleasures. He may neglect his duties, ridicule and defy the church, but the spark of faith needs but the chastening of adversity and suffering to quicken into a flame and develop true humility, patience, heroic sacrifice and labors for religion. The true Christian, though apparently in dif...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

fit ; t 88 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. He took a pair of spectacles, put them on, and looked straight at the dealer. "Nonsense, Mr. Isaacs!" he ex claimed. "What have you boon telling us? Nothing whatever can be seen through these glasses but black guards!" Whereupon all the other students laughed. "Vot! Ish dot so?" exclaimed the vender, as if in alarm. He took the glasses., put them on hastity, and looked at the party of students. "Mine gootness!" he exclaimed; "Dot ish so!" Then the boys went on; but then their laughter had suddenly died away. The armadillo is the mouser of South American families. A Sacramento gardener irrigates his garden by dog power. A Philadelphian has invented a four winged flying machine. The first thermometer is said to have been invented in Alexandria B. C. 130. A Swedish copper mine, has been worked without interruption for 800 years. INDIAN FOLK LORE. The recent payment to the Cherokees of the monejr coming to them from the purchase of the strip or outlet by ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

: "jprymr' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 89 a groat increase of rain at the time of the fires, and much hindrance to farm work. The Indians have always been excel lent weather prognosticators. Good Indian scouts have proved to be right nine times out of ten in their predic tions, and efforts have been made again and again to ascertain the nature of the signs relied on. No one except perhaps a Chinaman is more taciturn and impervious to argument and en treaty than the Indian when he wants to be, and it is seldom that he will give any hints as to how he reads the signs of the skies. On a certain evening it was noticed that after they watched the sky very carefully, they at once set to work to prepare for a cold night of exceptional severity. A remarkable drop in the mercury was recorded next afternoon, the cold continuing until the following day. A few years ago a party who were crossing what is now Oklahoma terri tory, were anxious to force their way to Purcell the following day. Their Indian...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

"TWI 90 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. marry one of the girls and make his own selection. A bet was made with him as to his ability to do as stated and during the evening ho visited the young ladies with some friends. The girls were taken unawares, and were unable to run away, as was their custom. To pass away the time they hid a ring in the ashes of the fire, and each player, being provided with a pointed stick, sought the ring with it, the one which finally found it being declared the winner. The ring was first brought out of the ashes by the younger of the girls, and, by the friendly aid of a good fairy, she was won by the confident youth, the chief's son marrying her sister. This legend, which is told in a dozen different ways, is believed by several people to be really the origin of a game in which Indians delight, and over which they will gamble away everything they possess, down to the last inch of their clothing. The gambling instinct seems rather to be increased than otherwise by civ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 91 according to his story, all night, his assailant finally disappearing by day break. The half-breed's explanation of this is that his friend had secured a liberal supply of firewater and had got terribly drunk on his way home, the chances being that ho had fallen off his horse and had had a violent attack of nightmare. However this might be, the man could not be persuaded to pass along the same trail under any condi tions, and persuasion" was simply wasted on him. Dozens of similar cases could be quoted, all of them showing that the Indian memory is most retentive and that nothing will induce him to forget anything he has once thoroughly learned. Among the ghost stories with a moral which have been told a thousand times by Indians who claim a knowledge of ancient history and unseen wonders, one doals with the power achieved by certain celebrated chiefs by fighting with and overcoming superhuman objects. The story runs that a young Indian of exceptional strengt...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

92 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. I! '"Jfye Apgel ofpargatory. HOW MANY SWEET UEMINISCENCES THIS TITLE RECALLS TO A CHRISTIAN MIND. . Oh! it is sweet to think Of those that are departed. "While murmured Aves sink To silence tender hearted. While tears that have no pain Are tranquilly distilling. And the dead live again, In hearts that love is filling. F. W. Fabcr. THROUGH A SOUL IN PURGATORY. In the early forties, a lady of wealth and culture residing in New York Qity, related by birth and marriage to several clergymen in high standing in the Methodist Church, and herself a very conscientious and pious woman, lost an only brother to whom she was deeply attached. As far as her knowledge of him went, be had led a good life, was a church member, a kind son and brother, charitable in word and deed, but he had one great fault which his family had succeeded in keeping from the world. At certain times he would be seized with a mania for drink, and while it would then be given out by his relatives th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 93 I began to sing in a loud voice. This attracted the notice of tho Superior whose room is on the ground floor. She came to the window, asked mo some questions, and after learning who I was, she said : 'If tho story you tell is true, we will give you shelter for the night, for it would not be fitting that the son of so worthy a father as yours should publicly disgrace him.' She summoned an employee of the hospital an old Irishman-r-who took me to his own quarters for the night. The next morning I was quite sober, but in a raging fever which lasted several days. When it was spent they brought me here and my first act was to send for you. And while I have been lying here I have come to this conclusion : Tho Catholic Church may be as corrupt and full of errors as we have always sup posed, but I cannot reconcile this fact with the tenderness, simplicity and beautiful self-sacrifice of these daughters of mercy, devoted children of that Church we have been taught to ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

u THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. judgment. -Day and night she reflected and pondered, now inviting, now combating the convictions that forced themselves upon her. Reason and not sentiment was uppermost in her mind, when as the result of deep thought and earnest prayer she at length sought counsel from a dignitary high in the synods of her own Church. He merely laughed at her questionings, and sought to dissipate her doubts with a jest. But she would not be dismissed in such peremptory fashion, and spoke to him in this wise : "Mr. ," she said, "you are very good, I know; so are my fathei and mother. I myself, might be a great deal better than I am, but I do not think I have ever done anything that would condemn me to eternal flames. "Without egotism I can feel myself to be not so great a sinner as that notorious robber and murderer who is to be hanged to-morrow morning, and who, they say has been baptized and has repented of hissins. Now, if I should live a hundred years I do not believe I sho...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. OS The Scriptures expressly says that "it is a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead, that they may bo loosed from their sins." (II. Mach. xii.) In their situation the souls in Purga tory can do nothing for themselves but suffer till they hnvo paid the last farthing. For, as our Savior assures us, when "the night of death cometh no man can work." (John ix, 4.) But, though the souls in purgatory can do nothing for themselves to ease or shorten their sufferings, yet such is the goodness of God, that in consideration of the union and charity which He so strictly requires among all the members of His Church the body of Christ and of that communion of saints which He Himself has established among them lie is pleased to accept of the prayers, sacrifices and good works of the faithful upon earth, when offered up by them for the souls departed ; and, on that account, relieves their pains, and grants them a more speedy deliverance from them. To work then, durin...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

96 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. one, death has taken four of them. Reader, if only a few years have gone over your head, most hap, our history is yours, and, then, our memories, on the second of November, will be blended in sorrow together. Our lives arc so much alike that the history of one family is that of another. A few strokes of the brush for a little change in the coloring matter, and the picture of one may change personage.' Kind reader, we have companions in life, and, also, when dead. And the companions of our life help us or injure us for eternity. Let us think, during November, of those with whom we lived in the days of our youth, and through out our whole lives. We loved our brothers and sisters, our dear fathers and mothers, relatives and friends, while God left them with us. Let us not forget them, now dead. Over the whole earth, from the rising to the going down of the sun, on the second of November, priests of every nation will be ascending the altar to offer the Holy Sacri...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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