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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 290 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 5 May 1894

THE RANCH ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. WEEKLY. A Journal of The Land and The Home in The New West. VOL. 1. NO. 16. PROSPECTS. Northwestern fruit growers seem to be fully alive to the opportunities be fore them. Spraying- for the destruc tion and prevention of insect pests has been general, thanks to the efficient activity of state officials and public press. Orchard planting has been go ing on this spring at an unprecedented rate, and care seems to have been taken in most cases to select varieties with an eye single to market condi tions, a few sorts of best selling and best shipping qualities. The older or chards that we have seen and heard from are mostly carefully pruned and cleaned and put in order by thorough cultivation —in condition throughout for a big crop. Lastly, shipping as sociations are being organized in the important districts for proper hand ling and marketing of the harvest. Now if all this careful and expensive preparation is followed up through the season by thorough work ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 5 May 1894

2 implicitly believe the scriptural in junction that he who will not work shall not eat. The exactions and op pressions of big corporations are heavy and damnable, but there is only one way to correct the abuse, and that is at the ballot box. * * All agencies seem conspiring- to pro mote the prosperity of the Yakima country this year. Short fruit crops in the east mean good prices for our almost certain great crop. The win ter has been favorable, and the cool spring has kept back fruit buds until danger of injury by frost is almost past; though the smudge as a safe guard should always be in readiness. Winter snows and exceptional spring1 rains insure a good wheat crop on the uplands, while the drouth in Califor nia means fair prices on the coast. With markets and weather in our fa vor, and with a soil and climate that will produce crops by irrigation at a cost unknown in the east, we may well be satisfied with the promise set in the skies. And with all the rest, and not least import...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 5 May 1894

flat, UJf@l2c; Swiss, imported, 30@ 32c; domestic, 16@I8c. BJyg»—Oregon, 9<§locper dozen. Poultry—Chickens, old, $3.50 per do*.; broilers, 53.50 (<t 4.50; ducks, $6 per doft.J geese, $8; turkeys, live, 14(a15c: dressed, 16crt»l7c per tb. Seattle Dairy Produce. Jfrggi —Jobbers' rate, 13(«14c. But ter —pastern creamery, 30(«:50c per lb; tubs, 24c; California print, 26c. Cheese —Eastern Cheddar, 12;ri)14c; Califor nia, 10(<tl2c. NORTH YAKIMA MARKETS. The protracted drouth in California will cut short many competing pro ducts, and this part of the country will reap a benefit. Already the pota to market is firming up somewhat; the outlook for hay brighter, and fruits will be in demand. The price of dried fruits here has advanced 3 cents per pound. Everything seems encourag ing to the ranchers of Washington. Butter is coining- in freely and the price of the Washington product is lower under the heavy supply and light shipments. Other quotations remain about the same. North Yakima...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 5 May 1894

4 NEW EXPRESS RATES ON FRUITS. Following is the new revised tariff on fruits and vegetables of the North ern Pacific express company. The rate is per 100 pounds: WKST-BOUND. Fruits & Mcl- Vegetables, ons. From North Yakima to Tacoma and Seattle...s 85 S 75 KAST-BOUND. From Walla Walla, El lensburg-h, North Yak ima, Yakima City, Dayton, Waitsburg, Prosser and Toppen ish, Wash TO Connell, Ritzville, Che ney, Sprague, Wash.. 100 Medic'l L,ake, Davenport, Coulee City, Wash 1 25 Marshall Junction, Oaks dale, Farmington,Gar field, Palouse,Pullm'n, Wash 1 00 Uniontown, Wash 1 25 Spokane, Wash 1 00 Genesee, Moscow, Voll mer, Juliaetta, Idaho.. 125 Coeur d'Alene City, Mis sion, Wardiier,Wall'ce, Burke, Mullen, Idaho.. 1 25 Rathdrum, Granite, S'nd Point, Idaho. 1 75 Thompson Falls,Ravalli, Horse Plains, Jocko, Arlee, Evaro, DeSmet, Missoula, Mont 2 00 Grantsdale, Mont 2 50 Drummond, Mont 2 00 Phillipsburg, Rumsey, Mont 2 50 Garrison, Anaconda, Sil ver Bow, Butte, Mont. 2 00 Marysville, Ri...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 5 May 1894

Cheese a Brain Food. Before the Paris academy of medi cine M. Beaucamp, an accomplished chemist, recently read a paper in which he maintained that both skim milk and cheese are brain foods. He based his conclusion on chemical an alyses and experiments, showing that pure caseine differs from all other al bumoids of his acquaintance, and that among other things it leaves no ash when burned. In a number of ex periments he found that absolutely pure caseine contains 0.753 of organic phosphorus. He has also demonstrat ed the presence in caseine of sulphur, and that this substance is made up of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, phospho rus, sulphur and oxygen. As brain matter contains the same ingredients, he therefore holds that pure caseine is a brain food. Relinquishnients, First-Class Homesteads and Desert Claims Located. Address A. BYKRH, KIONA. WASH., or A. H. DAWSON, Gottstein Building, Seattle. live WHOfiD Fruit Growers Who know what they want. They will find it in my stock of A 1, XXX ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 5 May 1894

6 STATE OF TRADE. [Continued from Page 14.] ■ movement going". One dollar a day, board yourself and do your own wash ing, seems very small wages for an American farm hand, but that is what many men are glad to get in the Puy allup hop fields today. Ten days of beautiful spring- weather gave grow ers a good chance to get their yards into splendid condition, and all work was vigorously pushed. In many yards training is well under way. The Puyallup country has furnished whole forests of fine cedar hop poles for the Yakima yards this spring. The John Dobson hop company, near Chehalis, is spending- $3,000 for im provements on its yard this season. The company now has forty-five acres of old and new hops. Oregon.—Oregon expects to harvest 50,000 bales this year. An Oregon dealer says that the last hops sold in that state went at 13 cents, and that there are not over 200 bales left in the state. San Francisco Wool. Spring —Year's fleece, per pound, 6(d> 7c; six to eight months, San Joaq...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 5 May 1894

Husband (during a domestic differ enc) —I don't know how it is that you have such a bad temper. Wife (with whom patience had ceased to be a vir tue) —It's because I've kept it too long, far too long". No wonder it's bad. — Grip. Yabsley —A man of your sense ought to know better than to be so supersti tious. What is there in the number thirteen that should make it unluckier than any other? You can't show a single instance to support your belief. Mudge—l can't eh? Where are the people who lived in the thirteenth cen tury? Every last one of them is dead. —Indianapolis Journal. FOH APPLES, PEAKS, PEACHES, Prunes", Apricots, and all other fruit trees and plants. Send for free catalogue. {3?"Speoial quotations on largo quantities. Ornamental trees and plants are our special ties. BURROWS & MILLION, 1113 FIRST ST., SEATTLE, WASH. SEED POTATOES. I have a fine lot of BURBANK AND EARLY ROSE Seed Potatoes for sale. Prices reason able. R. Sampson, North Yakiina. J. K. PERRY, Sunnyside Irrig...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 5 May 1894

8 THE RANCH. A Weekly Newspaper For Everybody Who Wants It Phice—sl.oo a year in advance. Woutii —Two gold dollars. Conducted by K. H. Liiuiy. Managing Editor, W. W. Corbett. Published by the YAKIMA PUBLISHING COMPANY. KDITORIAL OFFICKS: NORTH YAKIMA, WASHINGTON. business offices: North Yakima, Yakima: Avenue. Seattle, Room 7, Hinckley Block. Tacoma, 1113, Pacific Avenue. RANCH SMALL TALK. Bring on your eastern agricultural or other editors. Washington's re claimed Sahara has enough of sights and sounds, facts and figures for them to base volumes upon. The cautious orchardists say keep "smudge" materials handy for use until after the 10th of May. Not un til then do they consider the fruit crop out of danger from frosts. There has been so great a demand for the red varieties of winter apples for planting this spring that C. L,. Whitney of Walla Walla was unable to fill an order sent from this office several weeks ago. Dr. John W. Hershberger has spent three years in the fields of bot...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 5 May 1894

STOCK ECONOMICS. The Dalles Chronicle reports a prom inent sheep grower as saying that the conditions this year have been excep tionally favorable for sheep. They have done well on the ranges, and are in uniformly good condition. The clip is also of much firmer quality than ever before, the wool longer and of stronger fibre. The lambing sea son will also show a decided increase and will be 25 per cent, over other years. Altogether the outlook is hope ful, he says, if anything like a price can be received. Consul Meeker, of Bradford, Eng land, reports to the state department the offering of large quantities of American wool at his point, and that the prices of this wool in that market are practically the same as similar grades in England. He expresses the opinion, also, that should wool be de clared free the export demand will be quite large, and as a proof of this cites the fact that English buyers have all made large investments in wool in America. This indicates that, under any co...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 5 May 1894

10 THE INTERVIEWER. Tomato Blight l«vestigatlott—A Talk With PromlMCMt Growers—One Cause Suj gested—Also a Possible Remedy—Keep Shady and Water Plentlffi»lly-Volu« --teers Did Not Blight. This being the season for setting to mato plants, The Interviewer has taken occasion to secure the views of two or three growers regarding that mysterious disease known as "blight" that has made such inroads upon profits during the last few years. J. M. Gilbert, a horticulturist of considerable experience, and the scribe got down to the subject something af ter this style: Mr. Gilbert, have you met with the blight trouble in growing tomatoes? Yes, I have. Last year I lost about SO per cent, of the crop from the dis ease. Did you discover the cause of the difficulty? I did not. We examined very closely and often, from root to leaf, but could discover no insect or fungoid growth. At what stage of growth, and how did it appear? It seemed to make its first appearance when the most for ward tomatoes wer...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 5 May 1894

POULTRY RANCH. rour Poultry Editor is Harry H. Collier. No. 9,50 C St., Tacoma. Address him on all Poul try matters.] FOWL PICK-UPS. Get a move on you, Yakima, and or ganize that poultry club. Poultrymen of the state are waiting to see if you want them to bring their birds to the state fair, and nothing will do more to make them come than a poultry club. If you are not getting as many eggs as you think you should, watch the dogs. If dogs commence eating eggs a load of buckshot in a good gun in the hands of a man of sure aim is about the only thing that will stop the marauders. Young- turkeys require warm, dry quarters, and are easy to rear if given proper care. See that your hens are not too fat, for if they are they will not lay many eggs. If you have anything to sell, place an advertisement in the columns of The Ranch. You will get big returns. If you are an amateur, procure some good work on poultry culture and study every detail, especially the symptoms of diseases, so that when...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 5 May 1894

12 THE KENTUCKY RACE. D'ye hear bout that famous race 0' fottf leg ged beasts 'Twusb in ol« Kentucky? 'Twuz a rattler— you must know; From Lexington to Paducah. not a feller N6 that rivee. ■ But laid right down and laughed ha-ha-ha ha-a-w! tell he cried. •Twuz give out round in Lexington the race wuz free ah* far To env beast thet lied four legs an'grew a crop o' bar; An'every chap that had a nag for twenty inileH wuz thar. The day it gist wuz gourg's, an' the track it wuzn't slow; The bosses they wuz anxious for the tussle— don't you know! When up thar came a aidin'right afore the race course full. Ole Athaliar Jefferson, a-straddle on a bull! He had a tin horn in his hand an' spurs upon his boots; An' sieh a yell I never heard az come from Them galoots. The fellers on the bosses flunked an' claimed it mm squar; The jedges laughed to split their sides, but said the race wuz far. "Fur eny beast that bed four legs and grew a cropo' ha'r." Bo the jedges they got ready an' they giv the...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 5 May 1894

I can think of Riving- everything over to Dick Enness. I may not prove suc cessful in my effort to raise a crop, but I'll try. We have the team, the plow and the seed, and I'll make use of them." Mrs. Ashby did not acquiesce readily in her daughter's plans, but she finally g-ave a reluctant consent, and Mary at once set to work to carry her plans into execution. Fortunately she was used to hard outdoor work, having aided her father on the claim the two years they had lived in Kansas, and at the same time she had gained an idea of farm management that stood her in good stead. At the end of three weeks she had forty acres of ground broken and ready to seed, and she felt that the worst part ot her task was done. "I'll go over to Dick Enness's," she said to her mother, and get the drill and put the wheat in, and then I'll be through with the work for the present and have a little time for rest." "Goodness knows you need rest," Mrs. Ashby replied, casting a look of love and sympathy on h...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 5 May 1894

14 SAVING THE CLAIM. [Continued From Page 13.] would soon give up the undertaking, changed his tune and felt somewhat crestfallen when he saw the work com pleted. "I had no idea she was half so grit ty," he mused, "and it begins to look like I'll not have a very easy time get ting her off that claim, but then the chances are that her wheat will fail after all." But Enness was doomed to a disap pointment in his hopes of a crop fail ure, for her wheat grew and prospered, and at last when it was ready to har vest it was the finest field of grain in that section. Miss Ashby had a long spell of sick ness immediately after getting her crop out, but she was well and strong again at harvest time, and though En ness did all he could against her by hiring her harvest hands away from her, she was able to get her grain se cured without loss. When the wheat was all threshed and marketed Miss Ashby counted up the proceeds and found that she had $500 clear of all expenses. She was justly proud of ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 5 May 1894

•'You surely don't mean that," he gasped. "I do mean it. We won't take a cent less." "But you offered it for $200." "Yes, we felt that we were compelled to sell it, but we don't feel so now." "You will feel so," Enness said, as he arose and left the room. "You'll fail on your crop next year, and then you'll be glad to get what I offer, but I won't promise to give it." He had never dreamed that his offer would be refused, and he really wanted the land. He consoled himself, how ever,with the thought that Miss Ashby would yet come to his terms and be glad enough to accept his offer, and he determined to patiently bide his time. "I'm very sorry to have to decline your generous aid, Mr. Enness," Miss Ashby interrupted with a queer smile, "but the truth is, we've contracted the claim to the railroad company for a townsite for three times what you of fer." Without a word Enness left the house and walked back home. He was too completely beaten to say a word, but he thoug-ht a good deal. For...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 5 May 1894

i 6 Irrigation is King and We are the People ! .... . . , . Our great $75,000 cash pumping- plant is in operation, irrigating 3,000 acres • •••,:■ • . of the finest land under the sun. Prdsser is the commercial town of the lower :-.: • • Yakiina valley. 50,000 sheep are sheared here. , The great Horse Heaven wheat and stock country of 400,000 acres is at our backs. The wonderful Sunnyside - «-' ./. / . region is before us. The Northern Pacific railroad runs through our midst. A ... No^v we are going- to develop the farm lands, knowing that the town will '^^p^ *Now we are going to develop the farm lands, knowing that the town will . take care of itself. We are going to show our opportunities honestly and truth- '•:"'' fully, and we are going to help the people who come here. No fairy tales will .. • . . • • • • , be told. We are here to win, and those who come and stay with us will win, too. We will meet you half way on any fair proposition. Come and see us and our _~ , ~. _ r , „. _...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 12 May 1894

THE RANCH ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. WEEKLY. A Journal of The Land and The Home in The New West. VOL. 1. NO. 17. raOSJPEOTS. Men of ideas and men of action make the world think. Men of ideas and of action make the world move. Men who think vigorously and act broadly, who know the world is theirs so far as they act upon it with their might, are the grandest product of civ ilization. They do not lie down su pinely when hard times come and join the calamity howlers in their waitings. They shut their jaws together firmly and work the harder to accomplish their purposes. They are not narrow-mind- Ed, selfish creatures who squeal at every pinching- and think that success means only the g-etting- of dollars. Money and its wise expenditure is es sential to their success, but they spend freely and broadly, seeking- the ulti mate good, not the present 2 per cent. Conspicuous among- such men in our western country are those who have carried through these great irrigation enterprises in the face of har...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 12 May 1894

2 bor for man and his team. And now comes along the bicycle, knocking the roadster out of his harness and threat ening the existence of the boarding and livery stable in half the towns and villages. These are among the chief causes for the decreasing demand for the services of the horse. It is not the tariff or the walking commonweal ers. There is no danger, however, that steam or electricity or leg power will do away with the noble steed al together. But it does seem certain that the "plug" horse will have no reason to exist. The best of the race only will find place in the future. The farmer who realizes the situation and breeds only the best of the class in which he is interested, will continue to find horse breeding profitable. There will be no resurrection of the demand for low grade horses for any purpose. Government horse buyers say that the best army horses in America are those bred on our Washington and Oregon hills. There is a great opening here for fine horse and cattle b...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 12 May 1894

insects or disease. Peaches, delicious and certain five years out of six. Prunes, superior to California, prolific and sure. Plums, cherries and all the small fruits good enough to take their chances in any market in the world. And the fact stands out boldly: The growth here is more rapid and at the same time more symmetrical, and stronger than anywhere else. If man does his share —cultivates and waters — nature never fails. AXPA&FA. —This is the king- of all fodder crops wherever it will thrive, and here it finds every requisite to its growth and the perfecting of every quality that makes it the great muscle maker and fat producer —in short the most perfect animal ration yet found in one plant. Being1 perennial if well seeded and properly watered and not tramped to death, it is a permanent pro ducer. It does not always produce 10 tons per acre annually; 8 tons is a bet ter average, and 6 tons is g-ood enoilgil to keep it at the head of the list of forag-e crops. Swine Rearing.—...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 12 May 1894

■\ YAKIMA SHIPPING ASSOCIATION A start has been made hi the orga nisation of the Takitna shipping as sociation. On the 25th of April ar ticles of incorporation were filed with the county auditor, George C. Mitch ell, J. M. Gilbert and F. E. Thompson appearing- as incorporators. The af fairs and management of the associa- tion are to be under the control of nine directors, and the following gen tlemen are named as directors until November 1, 1894: G. C. Mitchell, J. M. Gilbert, C. P. Wilcox, F. E. Thomp son, D. E. L,esh, O. Halstead, W. H. Redmon, P. J. Flint and E. F. Benson. The purposes of the association are stated to be "To promote the interests of the producers of fruits and other products of Yakima county by co-op eration in shipping, collecting, and disseminating information bearing up on the preparation and marketing of said products, establishing uniformity in grading and packing, and extend ing and developing markets." The capital stock is put a §100,000 in 20,000 shares o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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