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Title: Cayton's Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 713 items from Cayton's Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 4 May 1918

WOULD FISH SUNDAYS When Elder Brown held a " 'traeted ef fort," as said the colored folks of Mississ ippi, referring of course to I religious re vival of a more or less protracted nature, his efforts were always gratifyingly suc cessful. After the crops had all been "laid by"—that is, needed no more cultivating, and only wanted time to ripen for the har vesting to begin—which was not later than the 20th of July, the most of the farm hands were given a semi-vacation from their strenuous labors for almost one month. Dur ing these semi-idle days they visited their friends, five and ten and occasionally twenty miles from home, which of course made thorn look forward to this season with a great many happy anticipations. The slate of Mississippi, it is safe to say, has about 20 per cent more colored than white citizens and in some of the river counties the colored popu lation is about eight to one over the white population and this great excess of colored population is largely responsible...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 4 May 1918

enter the high schools of the city and it is therefore very regrettable when one of them is cut down by death. Of the three colored pupils thai entered the Franklin at the same time as did Miss Myrtle, but one remains -of the other two one dropped out and the other died. Being of a gentle, kind and of a loving disposition in life, let's hope that after life's fitful fever she rests in the bosom of a loving Savior. She was laid tao her final rest last Thursday. Many floral offerings were sent by friends and among them two from her High School <-lasses. "It's ;in ill vvnid thai blows mo one good," runs an old adage. The Mt. Zion r>;i|>tist Church 11.• is purchased a lot near the corner of Nineteenth Avenue and East .Madison Streel Prom Louis Levy Mild thereby hangs ;i tale. Some years ago Mr. Levy ai considerable expense built him a two-story residence on tins self same lot ;iinl settled himself iind family down for ;i happy and comfortable existence', but there is always ;i ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 11 May 1918

\ £g^^ \ * m\^^f J&u/2ch& i^ee^^ PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the ■tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 LET'S HALT A MOMENT Patriotism, prayer and profiteering are the chief corner stones of our American civiliza tion and the greatest of these is profiteering. In the past the Americans have been accused by the Europeans as being money mad, ready and willing at any time to sell their souls to the devil himself, if he wo...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 11 May 1918

THE SNAKE DID IT In spite of the fact thai Aunt Nancy was fifty years of age she could dance a jig or cut the pigeon wing just as slick as a twenty year-old lad. Wound dancing was unknown to the anti-bellum plantation colored folks of the South and especially of Mississippi, but ;it quadrilles, Old Virginia reel and buck and winu dancing they were to the manor born. I»u1 to see ;i woman of Aunt Nancy's age do ing those dances ;is charmingly as did a young gal just sixteen and apparently without tire, was not only very unusual, but rather miracu lous. As generally pleasing as she was young and old seemed inclined 1o the belief that she was possessed ol the "bad imui," when she would eul some of her most fancy steps at the Satur day night hops; and once she almost broke up the party when she called for a tumbler filled with water and. after placing it on her head, danced through the first call of the quadrille withoul either holding it or wast ing a drop of the water. Such feats had b...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 11 May 1918

FROM A DAUGHTER OF SOLOMON (Susie Revels Cay ton) And it so was that 1 stepped off of a busy, bustling street, near the heart of the city, into the chapel of an undertaker's establishment. And as I sat there in silence niy spirit was quickly imbued with a great sense of peace for I had suddenly exchanged the glare of a bright Summer's day for the mellow glow of shaded lamps, the ceaseless clatter of traf fic for an unbroken calm, pregnant with that suggestive, mysterious atmosphere accompany ing the last rites and services when mortal man has passed into the great beyond. And as I sat my gaze rested upon a casket in its softened cover of grey with its pure white trimmings, with its carressing folds of gauzy tule stayed here and there with flowers increasing in number till they formed a rest ful bank around the receptacle. And I knew that therein lay all that was mortal of her who was my friend. Time, duties, obligations, shifting scenes and vary ing responsibilities had claimed us f...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 11 May 1918

TOWN TOPICS Is Black black.' No, and Black is not white, "but." said a lady, who had seen him in a crowd, "Black is almost white." Of course you are an angel without wings, but, who is your friend, to whom you whisper either with your lips or your eyes, behind the screens. II" S;ii!i Corhttti will but remember that a Xegro is only an Irishman turned wrong side out he will have less regrets about the coming of the Mt. /ion Baptist Church as his neigh bor. Tommy Williams, at one time a popular tonsorial ;irtisi ;ii Tutt's barber shop, has wired Mr. Tut I thai he had left Juneau for Seattle, which will doubtless hind him here Sunday evening or .Monday morning. 11 is truly hoped that the most of the 400 colored men working on the Seattle water front are saving a certain percent of their wages by investing the same in a home, which they will endeavor to fully pay for while get ting big wages is good. A white and a colored kid got into a knock down and drag out at one of the Seattle High ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 18 May 1918

I J@agfZcfs&^zeeAfa PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTONS WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up.'* A publication of general information, but In the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It Is open to the towns and communities of the ■tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of Journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 JIM MOORE RETURNS lii returning to the scenes of Iris younger days and that too in affluent financial eir pumstances, James A. Moore, Seattle's greatest prmoter and builder, is living up to the spirit and letter of the Western philosopher, who said, "so live that you jean look every damn man in the face and tell him to go to hell." M...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 18 May 1918

Last Tuesday night John Van Horn com mitted suicide and thus ended his earthly career, he being &2 years of age. Twenty live years ago he was a conductor on the Madison Street cable and thereby hangs a tale. Living on that line were a great many colored folks even more than at present, and that is saying a good deal. For some reason lie was always in a controversy with one or tiother of them — not a row, but a stiff argu ment over the political rights and public ac commodations that should be accorded them, and in his opinion the number of them were not very (treat. It was S. J. Collins that he told thai lv* was violently opposed to a col ored man holding any public position or do ing any thing a white man could honorably <l<>. Collins did not fly off the handle, but firmly took the other side of the argument. Alter sonic time Van Horn either quit or lost his conductor job and went into pol itics, and he went far enough in it to be a candidate for sheriff, A. D. 1896, f...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 18 May 1918

ODD BITS OF INFORMATION The custom of hanging baskets or wreathes of flowers at the door on the first day of May, is the survival of an old Eng lish floral festival which was observed for hundreds of years among England's rural population. The young men used to go to the woods, early in the morning on May first, singing this song: "Come lads, with your bills, To the woods we'll away. We'll gather the boughs. And we'll celebrate May. "We'll bring; our load home. As we've oft done before. And leave a green bough At each pretty maid's door." The Maypole, about which so many songs and poems have been written, was one of the features of the festival. The flower twined pole was erected in the vilage square, usually, and the vilage folk, old and young, gathered about it, for joyous singing and dancing. On Saturday, May 9, 1914, President Woodrow Wilson isued the first national Mother's Day proclamation, asking that Sunday, May 10th (the 2nd Sunday in May, 1914) be observed as Mother's Day,...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 18 May 1918

TOWN TOPICS Looking the picture of health as a re ward for her six weeks' South California outing, Mrs. Zoe (Jraves Young returned to the city last Monday afternoon and was at her place of business Tuesday. Southern California must be a great health restorer to so quickly restore one to health as it did Mrs. Voting. A colored woman doing business in one of the public markets is quite a novelty, but one has broken the ice and is doing her bit, just like the whites and the yellows (Jap anese) which lead us to say, amen. We have often wondered why colored folk did not almost monopolize the Pike Place mar ket, but of course they could not do that without first going to the country and growing stuff to sell on the markets, and the most of them having been brought "up on ;i In nil. why they did not seek to get country instead of city homes and grow and sell produce instead of seek .jobs in the cily where they are sturbornly opposed by the various labor unions. But it seems to be human nat...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 25 May 1918

J&uf£ch& PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up.'" A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the ■tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 THAT EFFICIENCY CLUB It is exceedingly commendable on the part of those instrumental in organizing the Effic iency Club in the City of Seattle, which held its first public smoker one evening last week. There is a burning need of efficiency among the colored folk in the city and if the members of the club do their duty and their whole duty ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 25 May 1918

ALMOST HAD RELIGION Among the colored folks of the South, immediately after the war, there were but two classes, the saints and the sinners—no degrees among the former, but quite a few among the latter, that is to say, the ordi nary sinner could be easily brought to the mourner's bench at the annual summer " 'traded effuts," but the sinner, who had stood at the crossroad, one leading from a "grave yard," and sold himself to the devil, if lie (the devil) would give him a gift to play the fiddle and had nerve enough to play a jig, while the headless spooks scam pered by. was to their minds beyond the pales of saving grace. Such sinners could sit and grin at the "elder" while he was preaching his most blood curdling hell and damnation sermon and find amusement in those meetings, where the convicted sin ners were screaming "bretheren what shall 1 do to be saved." It was in a meeting of this nature that Boh Brazile, who had joyfully gone through many "tracted effuts" without having had a...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 25 May 1918

WE SHOULD SMILE The naval class was under signal instruc tion. Most of them had just come back from leave and, as a result, to some of the boys in blue the instructor's voice seemed very far away, indeed. "A ship in distress," he was saying, through the room spaces, "has several meth ods by means of which she can make known her condition to the vessels or shore sta tions.. Name one, Binks!" "The international code signal 'N. C " replied Binks, waking up just in time. "Right!" said the instructor. "Jenks, name another." Jenks started out of a dream. "Eh?" he ejaculated. "What would you do if you were in dis tress?" repeated the signal instructor. "Why," mumbled Jenks, "pawn me watch!" As rats did much damage to his papers the Hindu clerk in charge of the official documents in one of the more remote Indian towns obtained permission to keep two cats, the larger of them receiving rather better rations. A few weeks later the head office at Delhi received this dispatch: "I have the honor ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 25 May 1918

TOWN TOPICS In organising a Young Colored Men's Ef ficiency Club in Seattle it started oft' in the Wright direction. lii closing ill* 1 Dumas Club and storing its furnishings it can be said without fear of successful contradiction that a "big money maker" lias been put out of commission. From the green cloth to the green sward that is from seven come eleven to hog and hominey is something out of the ordi nary I > lll Burr Williams threatens to go to farming. Cards have been issued by Rev. and Mrs. I). A. Graham announcing the matrimonial engagement of their daughter, Miss Lola, to S. T. McCants, .1 well known business man i the city. \o one wanted the presidency of the King County Colored Republican Club and so Mack had to break the third term night mare and permit himself to be re-elected. Good man at that. Doing good for somebody or something 1 seems to he the nature of Mrs. Jennie Vrooman and to that end she is planning a grand hall for June 10th in the interest of the Seattle...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 1 June 1918

__Bi mmr __r ____r ____^_*___r .___■ ___P^__^^_^__L_____L_t» ___^^^___^ _____^^^ ___»^^^_^^_r ___ ___r Jmw ____r PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTONS WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up.'" A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the ■tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 GET A SUBURBAN HOME You who live in Seattle and never gel further from your residence than one or the other of the city parks have no idea how many colored families live on suburban homes of from one to five acres, and on which they grow enough p...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 1 June 1918

THEY FOLLOWED THE FLAG On ilic plantation!) of Mississippi, if May ilii.i't'tli w.-is any different from April or June thirtieth, it \v;is because it rained May Moth find did not rain on the same <l;itf the other months, and ji rainy day was .ilw.iys ;i good day ;is it wjis a lioli diiv. Mini the only kind of holiday tlwii \v;is observed, except Christmas, liui liob Lewis, though bred and born in the state, had wandered North and had witnessed two Decoration Day ceremonies in memory of the old Soldiers find the fires of patriotism had been sei to burning in his soul. Hut. inspile of the fact thai he was doing well in the North he wanted to see the old folks ;it home again, find so one hrighi balmy morning in May, Hob strolled in on the old folks thus giving them a most joyful surprise, "He's drest to kill find iroi lots of money" spread through the neighborhood like wild fire: and he was like unto HariiiinVa "What Is It."' When he showed up at the monthly meeting, which was presi...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 1 June 1918

FROM A DAUGHTER OF SOLOMON Susie Revels Cnyton And behold, the hour was growing late and 1 sought my couch somewhat weary; not of the big things which I had met and conquered during the day but of the mani fold little hinderances, and annoyances which had sapped much energy. Moreover, I had also labored in a men tal conflict, the burden of which was still with me as my eyelids closed. Then it was, that I was conscious of ;i presence, near yet far removed; and in sonic mysterious way this presence imparted thoughts to me. Thus it was I became aware that my time in the world of men was ending; thai soon I must stand before my God. And I thought of all I would yet like to do in the world of men: of things I had hoped to accomplish, yea, of my loved ones whom I would have to leave behind. Vainly, I sought for some means of escape, of even, a postponement, yet I felt the finality of the imparted message. "Those who trust in <Jod should not meet Him holding on to earthly tics," imparte...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 1 June 1918

w;is my soul wns cleansed: "God suve the world," vehemently I prayed. And to my soul came joy undiscrible; came ;i happiness ne'er dreamed of before. Yea, I had ihe peace which passeth nil un derstanding. Moreover, the darkness grad ually began to lighten ;is when the sum's lirsi rays appear, distant birds their first morning's notes to utter. There were mur mers of limpid streams of water, whispers of balmy breezes, through tree lops blown: sounds of insects and growing things around me. and the clouds took shape and motion. Verily, 1 witnessed a new creation. Then I Fell myself a^iiin transported. Kelt thi 1 confinments of my body ;is my breath my bossnni stirred. Felt the babe upon my Ixissum, fell my eyelids unclose. lid. once more I lived. Selah. NEWS NOTES ( New York Age) Over $15,000 was raised by the Negroes of Dallas. Tex., iii the hist Liberty Loan cam paign. The colored citizens of Norfolk, Ya.. sub scribed nearly $50,000 to the Third Liberty Loan. Thirty thousand colored...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 8 June 1918

_ . ' J@aifZcM& iMe&fifa PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up.'" A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates marie to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher TETrEFHONE: BEACON 1910 GOVERNMENT OWNERSHIP It begins to look as if the 11. S. govern ment will be forced to take over the control of the telegraph lines of this country as a war necessity, owing to the controversy now raging between the employers and em ployees of that company. The telegraph lines of the country, as a whole, is a right bower t...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 8 June 1918

TOWN TOPICS John Prim is to receive his sheepskin From i lie Franklin High next Wednesday Htld go forth in the world to battle for suc cess. While he is not occupying the position ;is star of his class, yet his markings are above the class average. During the four years he has been in the Franklin he has been one of the most generally popular pupils in the school. lie early developed into a line gridiron athlete and succeeded in making the Franklin football squad the leading team of the city high schools, which of course, popularized .John. Among the pupils he was known as Pinky Prim, lie was also a star baseball player. He plans to enter the I'niversily of Washington next September. Two ini'ii were in ;i hot dispute and one of them branded the other "a dirty s. I).,'' which is looked upon as the most oprobrious epithet that one man can apply to another. Number one went to pieces in a minute and cleared for fighting, but a friend of his interfered and appealed to him to not lose his...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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