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Elephind.com contains 317 items from Polynesian, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 20 March 1841

1 rmTUTTiii 1L UilUli F(D)LYNE PUBLISHED WEEKLY, AT HONOLULU, OAHU. SANDWICH ISLANDS. J. JA11VKS, K.lUor. SATURDAY, MARCH 20, 1841. Vol. l.Xo. 41. A ski.kct i:i. PARTY OF "cilUSOES ON A DES ERT ISLAND. Continued (torn page 15 3 Their last improvement was to tnanu- . i i r . Vturc a sort ol woouen ircncucr lor Icmsclvcs, when they ate comparatively a style of superior comfort. In the up, they sometimes put elephant skin, (rich had the appearance of tripe, hut in f ate and substance it is described as of a fibre "leathery nature." After dinner, lime of them went again to hunt for griib," some remaining at home, the "j liftcst runners being chosen to hunt the )il. At " tea time," or dusk, they re "i Wd, and partook of a mess composed boiled in water. Now T)d then they killed the albatross, .vhich I rather a strong bird, and roasted it ; ( It as the young ones were highly esteem ; f, and as the mariners daily began to ' So. their hone of being delivered, they ? ire afraid to kill the ol...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 20 March 1841

T u : P O L Y n i: S I A N. Marc: 162 carrying from Hi to 'Mt otitis, of wliicli !.' are in commission, 1 in ordinary, and 1 preparing for sea. There arc; Wvj. car rying ten irnns each, one is a receiving vessel, and 8 arc in commissions. Then are 10 schooners, carrying from t to 10 guns, all in commission. There are two steamers and one store-ship all in commis sion, and two sea-steamers hnilding. The total is (H vessels, '.)) being now in commission, 1:2 inordinary, 12 on the stocks ready for launching, or in ordinary, 4 preparing for sea, and I receiving ves sel. They carry, in all, iilOO'guns. Of the officers of the navy in commis sion, there are 55 captains, 55 comman ders, s2i)0 lieutenants, (Jl surgeons, 17 passed assistant surgeons, 5'J assistant surgeons, oi pursers, ;s ciiapiams, ijm passed midshipmen, I midshipmen, ii!) masters, 17 professors of mathematics and teachers of naval school, ll'i boatswains, )7 gunners, 21 carpenters, and 25 sail makers. Sailor Mauazino. I'ris...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 20 March 1841

.1841. THE POL Y N E S 1 A N . 163 !kcu the liberty of making use ot' our names, i Holland, by her Majesty's ship Heaslc, says, tlio contrary c.trcr.io of hcinjj swayed w it h that the experiments already made in the ordnr to give more force to their malicious I " But the most intertf tin" intelligence of reason in favor of whatever U c.kl. The business warrant the company in believing .t'w Holland oi three immense rivers, stretching no fur into the interior us to admit of reaching by their channel almost the een- foilowiii'j is 1 Guf.ECK. The New York Commercial Advertiser publishes the following extract nn an article on modern Greece, in the line number of Fraer's Magazine. "Among the establishments of Athens, e must interesting is unquestionably the merienn missionary school. With no oth- assistance than hit own energy, and at pt with a very imperfect knowledge of the Jnguagc, Mr. Hill has succeeded in cstab- mug a school lor cmltfrcn ot hotn sexes, whoso management so much discr...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 20 March 1841

164 THE POLYNESIAN FOETP.T. Tor (lie Polynesian. "ONE EVENT HAPfENETH TO ALL." And what is this which all endure, The young, and fair, and brave? What shall the-noble and tho pure Shore as the vilrst slave? Joy does not beam in every eye And fill each bounding thought All hearts are not condemned to sigh With wretched feelings fraught Some souls there are, celestial pure, Kich, polished and refined, Just fitted for a heavenly sphere, To grace a world of mind; And ome, across whose dark'ning waste No flow'rs of beauty spring, But deadly plants, in decp'ning shades " Blackness of darkness " fling. Yet low shall rest, by fate subdued; In undistinguished state, Whose patient virtues stamped him good Or crimes have styled Wm greiil- Time-honor'd brows must'meet trie shock, And the form of youthful' grace, The event shall the firmest soul unlock And the gentlest heart embrace. Alike unnerv'd the hand of power Which grasped the sword of wrath, And her's whose unobtrusive love, Shed flowers...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 27 March 1841

THE POLY 0j P U BL1S1IK1) WUHKLV, AT HONOLULU, OA HIT. SANDWICH ISLANDS. J. JAItVKS, Kdihr. SATURDAY.. MARCH '21, mi. Vol. 1. TVo. 43. f F. 1. K 1). i IVom tli; New Yorker, j TIIH OIIIKJON TFKUITORV. ! riu,iir, Historical and Political, on the1 N'dith West ('oast of America and the I lAdjiiccnt I erntorics: 1 Unstinted by a ma) Rind centra plural view of those countries. iy HoiJKiiT (iiikenmow, translator and h- irarian to the Department of State. 1 vol. vo. cv York, ilcy St Putnam. r.fio.v is the most recently discovered Dorado, rrom the time of the cxpe-j ion of Lewis and Clark to the mouth; -i i I ! T ; t c (1 tlie iouiUHia jumt, u succession oi tivollcrs have described its skies as the; j'falitcst, its soil as the richest, its scene-, as tlie most beautiful and its climate the most enchanting of any in the ; brkl. Some few dissenting voices have i H?cd been raised, but an almost unani- bus sentiment has prevailed that the tural beautv of the country, and its oth- advantages and ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 27 March 1841

186 t n i: r o l v n t; s i a n IM A He, of forty decrees bet ween viiirhe and neon is not uncommon. Such eircunn-tanc primitive as the rest of the equipment. rope, noose, or nothing on goes this cjt alcade, upon the run, trot, or hobble belt,. bound.- in lidi. jjLiiliciilarlv in sihiion, ami ineiclKintiucn. but particularly to which ascend nil its branches up to the catch Commodore- Rodgerss, who he un- arr. alone sufficient to ren'ir any ;i!t-mpt ISIue Mountfuns. and form the principal derstood.hnd command oi the largestunil at cultivation in this region entirely fruit- means of subsidence for the natives of the latest sailing frigate in the American less-, find a great portioiof thoiiufice first and niiddh: region. These natives Xavy ! 1 inquired of him what kind of m moreover sn tirnnn-k- i.iiTiirvri.r-tPfl with are. i:i numU r iiiiotii twenty thousand, a man this Ilod:;crs was, and if ever he salts of various kinds, that plants could Areompanvm;; this Memoir is a map of had see...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 27 March 1841

ML T HE PU L V N K ,S 1 A cm look like a crowd of harlequins, or a i tion. Strangers arriving here in a lawful For fleas ill biie. and flies ill hum. .vtcrrc of variegated flowers, to the num- monncr havo no dithcultv in obtaining the ilrofniany thousaiul-i, assemble in the main i "'cccsaarypassporls either to reside or trav r . .1.- i: i ,.'cl in Cahiurma." reel, to wiiness inu cuiiiucitii:u leais 01 ,rscmanshi, such as leaping, plunging, i:jn kicking, tumbling, (nif soni'timm), Aid various other approved methods of show- I L; flf. much in vogue here, among some ' J i.li.iu vmith. mill (rrniitlu tit ttio rwl i iri - A species of doggerel yclept "straws," has become quite common of late in the newspapers of the day. Tor our own part, we are no advocate of such wholc- nofthe gaping crowd, and somewhat to j salo massacre of the king's Knglisli, ot c danger of their sacred persons. How-: the following is as gooil as any thing of jver, this fiery zeal soon exhausts itself, and tit grows...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 27 March 1841

J 158 t ii r: i' o i. y n i; s i a n Mar NKPT uxi:. find of the fearful trident! On thy hi'ow Sits it v fill innje.y.ty as on a throne; y That makes the Ocean's mvriad monsters bow In low obeisance, ihy dread power to own ; And brings the gentler dwellers ofthe briar, Whoso" light and "laceful llrii i os, far out- r5 o o shine Earth's fairest forms, to sport and gambol round, By mingled love, and fear, and pleasing won der bound. Lord of the boundless waves, sea-potent dread! From pole to pole, through every varying zone, Thy mighty liquid empire is outspread Immeasurable, matchless, and alone. The sea obeys thee, and at thy command Is calm or troublous, and the trembling land, Smit by the mace of thy dread sovereignty, Earth-shaking Neptune, owns its fealty to thee. When cloud, and tempest, and the dark brow 'd storm, Sweep o'er the sea when mountain bil lows curl'd With deep-plough'd wrinkles do its face de form, And Ocean's voice is heard around the world, Amid the roar of elemen...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 3 April 1841

THE -2 LfWEIAI 1 PUUMSIIKI) V fi K K I. Y , AT H O - () I. II U tJ. OAIIU. SANDWICH I-SLANDS. SATURDAY, APRIL 3, Vol. I . 'So 40 I r 4 s t: m:cti; d. From tin; (!iMi'!(!iii ill's Miizini;. y the Author of OKI Irousiiies oft' a Loe Shore. L sea life is a curious medley of inci- ( Vts. Every day brings forth now plcas- k nr now nams. Novc tv is the altar jfore which Jack worships : and Fidlers' ecu, a phec situated according to the .filiation of old tars, three miles beyond (p location of a certain fiery old gentle tin called Rclzchub, is, according to his cried, the final resting place of the sons tithe sea. Grog is the solace of the old a-of-war's man grog and its accom- aiiuient tobacco with a full can and a the oracle of the ship, no one need differ with liini, for rank is powerful and must 1 if 1 1 revail. lie knows Dost what evcrv 0110 1 ought to have. Does a home-sick middy thrum an old fiddle in the steerage, the first lieutenent knows whether he makes too much noise he knows ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 3 April 1841

1T0 H f I i' U L V N E S J A N . cr, aii(l jri-st jit (.'vcniij'.rcliscvf'rcd rft. A'j- : After this I ui ?t of natural eloquence, i in one hummock, and then, with a sea nes' li-iit ahead. Ion !!y she dashed J u-!c wont' upon dec!:, wliita the darkey ! man's prayer, they worn bunched forth alonr t!i bill nvs. n; .! with'th.- s:;Ji:i of iLoJiM,?,! tn th, mm! lev mutterh'r. Oli ho 'to ioin the swollen hundred that danced ' - . II!.. .1 ...I. Mr. Jack, t?ver voti mind, I II sweeten upon tl'c nutated billows, cow in ueaiu. our hroli. vc'-Cnh ! vah ! vah !' I 'Morning came, and with il a calm; Wi'iil; this rou.rh and tumble was car-; the ocean was like a sleeping mill-pond ; .1 ? tne waici, a intern r .:. to ner e;isi.;u peak, arid a heavy cn;n;i mi:i -A its notes wit!) the thunder of the eljin'r.ts around. A larger shb r.o-.v rose upon 'i k d on below. v mint not for one mo-! the liht-housc stood solitan in the dis- the horizon astern, and ! a !: ;!it jjlcir.i- inumt suppose the hubbub ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 3 April 1841

T H i: P O L V N E S I A N . 171 wood, hammered into him in ho could unitim of the lungs, and dies bof.ro her bri- bultiut navigator ..;.t d t . lb-unit r oi't'.is, led Mnti- a little ?;-m' t-m tun years, hav (t:'i a:i opportunity. My companion on dal days arc over. ft,, ot'i'-r si.li.-, in.v tried to haul him to the exclaims the world; 9 t v inf. a cut oil" V r'lvirli.T!".0 !" that In coasted a . idnent tno ('jftiiin'f oi li lii' mii . ill .1.1 ill- rri'i', if mi i m 1'i.r 4i ((' . 1 lit: ii r (l,re. by the net a to which he had fastened happiness and h;o!M AU.! did she n .t' cut l.mgitude; a-.d Tvuig m (.7 erg. . ml:i. tf. tj:.H-di; u i ii.itauttisicnt assistance with . the thread of life herself? A 'iil ii the ' latitude. 1 a siippo-itidii w:h. that thi ; l.i!.-: ,. a- i na.i -n .e lorcu with mo wo nun- country, exposed to our chni.'rcful di.i.ati. must extend as fur West a. U i J-' J di '. wit., the aid of the women and chil-. gets a new bonnet instead of a (lun.iel iiar- i of l...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 3 April 1841

4LH 17 TO T h r. p 0 l V X K i A X .4 i i 4 It .7" W Li iL JTb J . , --! J "jfaM-ii Tor the I'olynsaian. X Y NATIVE LAND. r.v c. o. it. I've toiled over mountains And failed o'er the sea, To visit far countries Reputed t') be, The birthplace of wondcra And prodigies rare; I have seen I have tasted, A prodigal share. Cut wherever I roatn, On the land or the sea, lIy heart, native home, Still remains true to thee! No happier country, Thou land of the brave! Than thino, well-remembered! Is washed by the wave. Do we loolc for rare wonders, ' Niagara's Fall, Tor maj stic gl-ry O'er shadows them all! Do we search for a people, Intelligent! Free! Again, well-rcinembcrcd. We hasten to thee! Do wo seek for a place Where religion's pure light, 'Mid the dark storms of earth Beams most lovely and bright r Again do we hasten Thine altars to see, Thou land, well-remembered! We hasten to thee! No day passes o'er us, On Time's rapid wings, But to fond recollection Kind memory brings, A vision of gl...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 10 April 1841

I AM PUBLISHED WEEKLY, AT HONOLULU, OAIItf, SANDWICH ISLANDS. f J. JARVES, Wo SATURDAY, APRIL 10, 1841 Vol. 1. IV. 44. IT o.vinr :iivisiTV school. Vc have received an interesting report the present condition of the Oahu vf . . . ( larity School, printed at the Mission Honolulu. All will be gratified to j ;lr of the flourishing condition of this 1 istitution, and the amount of good which 1ms already accomplished. Notwith I anding the number of scholars in attend ee, there are doubtless many youth yet (provided for, and it is to be hoped that i funds will be so enlarged, as to confer tie inestimable blessing of a good cduca tjm upon all that class of the community Or which the school was established. The jjpid progress and lady-like deportment rf some of the older female scholars at- t -sts alike the patient zeal and good sys t ;n of their teachers, and their own capa fies for profiting by instruction. It is a comparison between the characters ( such pupils, and those of their sex and...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 10 April 1841

4 Li T II K POLYNESIA N. 171 Among children placed under such dis advantageous circumstances the prospects arc not very encouraging, and their pro gress, either in learning or morality, will be but slow, until the wholesome influen ces to which they are almost constantly exposed, are gradually removed, as it is to be hoped they will bo. On the con trary, when the efforts of the teacher have been judiciously supported by the con duct and precepts of the parents, of both sexes, the improvement h;ts been rapid, as the children are generally quick. Among other instances of children who would have been left to ignorance and i occupation, and are unwilling the bent of their own inclinations, may be j their wives and children, to seek precari rnentioneJ one who is in charge of an es-Jous Jiving in other countries, others who tablishment on California; another who! have been driven by want, to leave the ApriI' ing, many have returned to their native homes, others are deceased, while the re ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 10 April 1841

41- I) has been lilted out from tlii.s port, and it under the Hawaiian Hag, for a twelve )ntlia cruise, by Mr. F. J. Greenway, as whaler. We nre glad to see this spirit of terprise, and hope that her success will such as may induce her enterprising own and others to engage largely in this busi ss. This port affords many facilities for i branch of business, and may yet become e Sydney, the headquarters of a llourish r fishery. ;Our appeals to correspondents have not 4"cn in vain. For "The fragment of Ha- liian History " our best thanks are due, ; ugh it is too late for the present number ' hope that our situation will awake their j ther consideration. "Aloha " to the wri- of the " Unsuccessful Miracle "pi ace our next. r ire. The Sugar Mill at Ewa, belong to Gov. Kekuanaoa, caught fire on licsday evening last, destroying the greater jt of the Sugar House, and several bar ris of Sugar and Molasses. The Mill and fillers were saved. THE POLYNESIAN. 1 ;.) . jl'ho United States Sloop of W...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 10 April 1841

176 F0BTR7. T H E P 0 L V NESIAN J Still, in the sad and serious hours of life, Turns to the sister, mother, friend, or wile; Views with a heart of fond and trustful pride His faithful partner by his calm fireside; And oft, when barr'd of Fortune's fickle The Mother who has a Vhild at Sen. There 's an eye that looks on the swelling cloud, Folding the moon in a funeral shroud, That watches the stars dying one by one, Till the whole of heaven's calm light hath gone; ' There's an ear that lists to the hissing surge, As the mourner turns to the anthem dirge, That eye! that ear! oh, whose can they be, But a mother's, who hath a child at sea? There's a cheek that is getting ashy white, As the token of storm come on with night, Ther's a form that's fixed at the lattice pane, To mark how the gloom gathers over the main, While the yeasty billows lash the shore With loftier sweep and hoarser roar', That cheek! that form! oh, whose can thev be, Hut a mother's, who hath a child at sea? The rush...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 17 April 1841

UMIE FOLI IAN 1 PUBLISHED WEEKLY, AT HONOLULU, OAHU, SANDWICH ISLANDS. J. JAUVES, Editor. SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 1841. Vol. 1,lYo. 43 COMMUNICATED. For the Polynesian. Fragment or Hawaiian His tory. The events of the following brief nar- fjtive occurred about fifty years since, ( iring the early days ot the reign of ha lt ehamcha I. and before he had subjuga te d to himself the eastern part of Hawaii. iie account is narrated by an intelligent live, and an eye-witness of the events scribed. It is penned with a view to cit if possible, an investigation of the uses which produced so singular a ca- Istrophe. Keoua, a son of the late king ilaiopu (lerraoboo of Cook,) was then possession of Hilo and Puna, and was ntendinor with Kiana. one of Kameha- peha's chiefs for the supremacy of the Quthern parts of the island. It appears ( r the narrative, that the latter had re C ntly taken possession of Kau for his I ,ng, and had driven out the inhabitants rjho had fled to the interior, in the imme (...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 17 April 1841

178 t ii i; v o l v n j: s i a n. up- France and America N;KT.'diIv i'w. . I I .1 t on every point wrncii uk imprudence or impolicy of (I rout I'rilum neirh .'-N : re cording to Mr. Whilimriou, (vide his Falkland,) the. former pom r h-is tu'veu possession of Maldonado, whieh they ate colonizing under tho title of Fhillip'villc, the Monte Video. ol'-J emigrants havm"- .although rain is so frequent, it docs not William in readiness to supply ships with continue falling- for anv considerable time ; out delay, that one convenience only, and as the evaporation is rapid, in consc t. j , when generally known, would ensure the visits ol almost every Australian and lex can trader, beside, many others. No one making a long voyage hesitates to take in an additional supply of good water during his passage, if he can do so without ma terial dclav, und without danger. It is the natural unwillingness to Lret in with UiMiee ol so lnucii wind, there are no un wholesome exhalations; indeed, the c!i m...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 17 April 1841

an. adequate advantages, to recompense her ,r the outlay. j But England is not the only country which L rapidly advancing its fortunes upon the! V iwntall of others. Russia is bent oncstab- hing a military despotism, a power which , extent and fortune can only he compared i the Caars', around the globe. Already ie bristles against England on one side, and Wheedles the United States of North Ameri- on the other, prepared alike to help her- jelf from the territories of cither, as chance tv open the way. Diametrically opposed L the principles of both, she founds her right blood and conquest. The will of one nan, like the sun's light, penetrates and an imates the whole of this vast empire. In op position to it nothing lives. Can such a lower endure. We think not. Some oth- r emperor, with less intellect and energy Jian the present autocrat, in attempting to icld this enormous machine, will find it irumblc to pieces from its own weight. Like vast hut unsolid rock, which while station- tr...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 17 April 1841

am 180 T1IE OLD AIIM-CIIAIR. I love it, 1 love it; and who shall dare To chide me for loving the old arm-chair? I have treasured it long as a holy prize, I've bedew 'd it with tears, and embalmed i with sighs; 'Tis bound by a thousand bands to my heart; Not a tie will break, not a link will start. Would ye learn the spell a mother sat there, And a sacred thing is that old arm-chair. In childhood s hour I lingered near The hallow 1 seat with list 'niug tar; And gentle words that mother would give, To lit nic to die and teach me to live. She told mo shame would neve r betide, . With truth for my creed and God for my guide. She taught me to lisp my earliest prayer, As I knelt beside that old arm-chair. I sat and watch M her many a day, When her eye grew dim, and her locks were grey; And I almost worshipp'd her when she smiled And turned from her Bible to bless her child. Yoars roll'd on, but the last was sped My idol was shatter'd, my earth-star fled; I learnt how much the heart can be...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
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