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Title: Polynesian Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 3,890 items from Polynesian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 15 February 1845

1347. J It not unfrcqiicntly happens that wc re ceive information of what has been going on in distant parts of these Islands, through the channel of thcniled States, where it has made its appearance in print in the ?iiape of letters to friends, etc. If there he an earthquake, 'volcanic eruption, or any accident, largo or small, or any news wor thy of type at all, it should not to sent off to add to the interest of foreign journal hut reserved for the usn of our own or ckso the editorial fraternity will have- to petition! the legislative hody for thccnaetment of a! high export duty on all news not sent through the legitimate channels. Whntsav you of the Friend, Nonanona, and Monitor, to this doctrine ? Upon looking over a recently arrived nuinher of the .Missionary Herald, puhlished at Huston, and which we! are quite sure few hut religion readers rc, ! we found an account of the last great erup-! tion at Hawaii. The particulars were as' good as news to us, and we presume will Im i t...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 15 February 1845

160 THE POLYNESIAN. February, ADVERTISEMENTS. CJBY ORDER OF HIS MAJESTY, THE KIXQ OF THE HAWAII AX ISLAXDS. OrriCK of Secretary or State t n r ti r i n m Arriftm w v a w r a . i ttt r r a y Honolulu, Oahu, Jan. 20, 18 15. ) Whereas, Richard Charlton, u Hiitisli subject, pretends to claim n ccrtiin fuece of land in the Village of llono iihi, which claim was referred back to the Hawaiian Islands, by Her Britannic Majesty's Government, on the 12th Sep tember 1843, to enable said Charlton to produce his grant and show it to be gen uine : Public notice is hereby given that His Majesty appoints the court of the Island of Oahu as that branch of His Govern ment to which said Charlton is to make such production and showing pursuant to Chapter 40 of the Hawaiian Statutes, and Chapter 47 of the Translation into English; and said Charlton is hereby required npon pain of forfeiting all claim to said land, under the decision of II. IS. M's Governmet, already mentioned, to produce his grant and sh...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 22 February 1845

TEE POLI III PUBLISHED WKEKLY, AT IIOOLl H , OAIIU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS. J. J. JARVES, Editoh. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY aat 1845. NEW SERIES, Vol. 1. No. 40. - - - - TTTTT"""'"-r - - - - - - - O U 1V1 iVL U IN 1 U A 1 Jtj D . Extracts from a Traveller' Sketch Book. A Trip to Mauua Loa from the east-side and Way-Side Scenes. )y No. 3. Having delivered ourselves of our bristly friend, we made all haste, to reach a spot suitable for a night's encampment. For several hour9 we continued our course in the same direction which we took in the morning. The forest continued as dense, and our progress was slow. The ground, although gradually ascending from the first, had become more broken. Wo frequently came upon deep glens, and hollows, some of which were a half mile or more in circum ference. Their side9 were very precipitous, although overgrown with shrubbery, and the tall trees growing from their bottoms were but just able to stretch their topmost limbs upon a level with the surrounding for est. T...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 22 February 1845

1G2 T H i: V 0 Is Y N ESIAN. February, medley of fact, criticism, and conclusion, so continually fermenting in the active brain? He fearful of those of who love it not, and banish such as would imbibe its delights yet bring no contribution to the common stock. There are men who seek the reputation of wisdom by dint of never affording a glimpse of their capabilities, and impose upon the world by silent gravity; negative philoso phers, who never commit themselves beyond the utterance of a self-evident proposition, or hazard their position by a feat of greater boldness than is to be found in the avowal of the safe truth which has been granted for a thousand years. There is a deception here, which should never be submitted to. Sa gacity may be manifest in the nod of Bur leigh's head; but it does not follow that all who nod arc Burlcighs. He who habitually Bavs nothing, must be content if he bo re garded as having nothing to say, and it is only a lack of grace on his part which pre clude...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 22 February 1845

1845. Uto do so, having no right to command it to do otherwise." This covers the ground in its most ample sense. Even admitting, for the sake of argument, what is just the reverse of fact, that the courts of thi3 nation have de cided cases not altogether in accordance with the enlightened views of more learned tribunals. Chapter iv., 49.-" Every nation as well as every man, has a right not to suffer any other to obstruct its preservation, its per fection, and happiness." If a nation has this right in regard to another, it must assuredly possess it in as full degree in regard to an individual, especially when his actions and influence are entirely discountenanced by his own nation. Lest there should beany doubt of the right of a nation to regulate its own concerns, to form and interpret for itsolf its own con stitution, to create its own judiciary and all other offices, rules, and forms, which it deems necessary for the proper administra tion of its afTairs, independent oY foreign co...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 22 February 1845

164 T H K P 0 L YNESJANi February, ADVERTISEMENTS. C3BV ORDER OF HIS MAJESTY, THE kixo of the ii.urjir.ix islaxds. Office or Secretary or State run Foreign Affairs, , Honolulu, Oahu, Jan. 20, 18 13. ) Whereas, Richard Charlton, a British subject, pretends to claim a certain fn'ece of land In the Village of Mono nlu, which claim was referred back to the Hawaiian Islands, by Her Britannic Majesty's Government, on the 1 2th Sep tember 1813, to enable said Charlton to produce his grant and show it to be gen uine : . Public notice is hereby given that His Majesty appoints the court of the Island of Oahu as that branch of His Govern ment to which said Charlton is to make such production and showing pursuant to Chapter 4Gofthe Hawaiian Statutes, and Chapter 47 of the Translation into English; and said Charlton is hereby required upon pain of forfeiting all claim to said land, under the decision of II. B. M's Govcrnmet, already mentioned, to produce his grant and show it to be genuine t. c....

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 1 March 1845

THIE POLYNESIAN im nrism n weekly, at Honolulu, oaiiu, ii vav vii a islands. J. J. JARVES, Editor. SATURDAY, MARCH I, 1815. COMMUNICATED. Extracts from a Traveller's Sketch Hook. A Trip to Mnunn I. on from flic eat-silc, ti lid Wny-Side Scene. No. 4. The next morning the natives complain ed much of the cold, although the thermom eter was hut two degrees lower than the night precccding. I was myself quite stiff. Hut the fog had cleared oh", the air was cool and bracing and the sun shone out with a freedom that promised a warmer day. The belt of wood which wo had seen from the other side was nigh, and we had made a tol erable correct course for the point at which we aimed. At this distance, I saw that it was a knoll or hill, well crowned with trees and some miles yet distant from the outer edge of the main forest. This we soon en tered. Vegetation was not so rank as in the one we passed through the second day of our journey, yet it was luxuriant, tolerably free from underbrush and eas...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 1 March 1845

March, T II K V O L V N i: S IAN. when it wn no fault f h-rs. When butter is put in firkins, it should be pounded in with a layer of salt on the lower head, and an inch of strong pure brine on top of the butter; and the firkins should be made of thoroughly sea soned wood white ash, oak, beech or hem lock but it must bo seasoned. A great loss is sustained every year, by putting but ter in unseasoned packages. To make good butter, it wants care, cleanness, and .good salt; and plenty of salt at all times for the cows. Let as all have good butter this year. Boston (t.' S'.) Transcript. The above is as worthy of attention in the lati tude of 20 as of 40. Victoria's RnsrncT for thf. Sahhath. Her Majesty of England, amidst the admira ble influences of nn education such as w ell becomes a woman and a monarch, cherishes above all others, those purely moral and re ligious precepts instilled into her mind from her earliest years, and being, in fact, of prima ry importance in managing the reins...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 1 March 1845

1 3 J.V A Card. - We, the uixlrsianetl. feelimr H.i much pr.u! i Jo t-npt. Pki.l, for I.m tinrcmittin exertions in saving tlic oil and oilier properly from the w reck of the late tdiip Holder Horden, and fool ing that "0 lias by so doing show n himself energetic and efficient in his profession, are very happy to adopt this method of publiclv avowing our fei dings; and we would further add, that considering the very' i.uny disadvantages and dillienltics under whieh ('apt. Pell was plated at the time of I ho v.reeli, the rourse that ho adopted, and I he ntcrpriing spirit he winifcsted in building the Sch. ;, frOM1 the wreck, ami the prudence ho displayed in leaving provisions, and men to oversee the property, and in f.t Capt. Poll's ' whole proceedings dini'.,, the unpleasant dilemma in which he was placed, j deserving of the highest praise, and we IV. I happy in hearing tesliinony to the same. WM. SI'MNKll Senior, . & 1 1. WU M IN JAMES M AKKK, C. IU V 15 .l.aliamn. Maui. ) wi it...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 1 March 1845

March, T II i: V O L Y N K S I A.N, 1C8 ADVERTISEMENTS. cr;jF OliDMUOF HIS MAJESTY, Tit 11 K'lXO OF THE IIAWAIIAX IS LAXDS. OrriCE ok Sbi:etahv or State tun Foreion Akkih, Honolulu, Oihii, J in. 2D, 145. ) Whereas, Uichnrd Charlton, a IJritisli subject, pretends to claim a certain piece of land in the Village of Hono lulu, which claim was referred back to the Hawaiian Islands, by Her llritannic Majesty's Government, on the 12th Sep tember 1813, to enable said Charlton to produce his grant and show it to be gen uine : Public notice is hereby given that His Majesty appoints the court of the Island of Oahu as that branch of His Govern, incut to which paid Charlton is to make such production and showing pursuant to Chapter 40 of the Hawaiian Statutes, and Chapter 17 of the Translation into English; and said Charlton is hereby required upon pain of forfeiting all claim to said land, under the decision of H. 1J. Ms Govcrnmet, already mentioned, to produce his grant and show it to be genui...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 8 March 1845

THE POILYR III IMIKMSHS:,, WEEKtY, AT HOAOM . V, .WAIIAS lsl, VMs. J. J. JARVES, Editor. SATURDAY, MARCH 8, 1845. COMMUNICATED.' Extracts from a Traveller's Sketch Hook. A Trip to Mnnnn Loti from the enst-sidc and Wuy.Side Scenes. ' No. 5. I After having refreshed myself with my bath and meal, I proceeded to further ex plore the shores of this lake. As the south ern border offered the most picturesque ap. pearance, abounding with groves, wooded dells, and now and then stretching for back into a fine grassy plain, I took that direction. Along the beach were numerous dead shells of the Paludina and another spiral shell whose specific, name was unknown to me. Owing to the numerous little indentations or tiny bays which lino the shore, it was a full half hour before I arrived at the south-eastern extremity, where a fine cluster of noblo trees threw their branches over the water. Penetrating this clump, we emerged, most unexpectedly, on an area, considerably over grown with tall bushes, ...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 8 March 1845

T JI K 1' O I, V N E S 1 A N . (March, 170 we look down into a dark and frightful chasm, walled up on cither side by rocky Muffe, and one is struck with the sensation that he has come to the jumping-oll-placc. But by taking advantage of a small ravine which breaks through this wall, he winds his zigzag way down the steep to the bottom when he finds himself in a narrow walled up channel, in the middle of which it requires an elevation at an angle of at least 45 to reach the summit on cither side by a straight line. This valley contains very few tracts of alluvial bottom and of very small extent. In proceeding onwards one makes his way up the steep on the other side to an equal elevation, and after a few miles down he goes again into the bed of a small stream emptying into the former, the blufls along which are less precipitous than those of the former. This valley also contains but a small amount of alluvial bottom of inferior quality. .After proceeding up this .valley for some miles...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 8 March 1845

1845. Such proceedings as were witnessed in the Court Room, in the late caso of appeal, commencing on the 28th ult. and terminating on tho 3d instant have for some timo past been foreign -to those walU. Since the establishment of thu judiciary on its present basis, the courts have hitherto born re gpected by foreign officials, nnd the authorities treated with the decorum due their stations. But it was reserved for George Brown, Esq, the Com missioncr of the United States, in the prusence of and sustained by two officers of the U. S. Frigate Brand) wine, to act a scene nhich niude a deep"im pression upon every spectator. Ah soon an possible as complete a synopsis as can be nnde will be -pub-bulled, taken from the stenographic notes ol the sworn reporter of the court, fu the meanwhile a full manuscript copy will be sent to the Government of the United States, and tho'cxtraordinary assump tions and menacing deportment of Mr. Brown made the subject of a solemn und indignant protest. T 1...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 8 March 1845

172 T II i: POLYNESIAN. March, ADVERTISEMENTS. CJnY ORDER OF HIS MAJESTY, THE KIXG OF THE HAWAIIAX ISI.AXDS. Office of Secretary of State 1 for Foreign Affairs, Honolulu, Oahu, Jan. 20, 1843. Whereas, Itichard Chnrlton,fi British subject, pretends to claim a certain niece of land in the Village of Hono lulu, which claim was referred back to the Hawaiian Islands, by Her Britannic Majesty's Government, on the 1 2th Sep tember 1813, to enable said Charlton to produce his grant and show it to be gen uine : Public notice is hereby given that His Majesty appoints the court of the Island of Oahu as that branch of His Govern ment to which said Charlton is to make such production and showing pursuant to Chapter 4Gofthc Hawaiian Statutes, and Chapter 47 of the Translation into English; and said Charlton is hereby required npon pain of forfeiting all claim to said land, under the decision of II. IJ. M's Govemmet, already mentioned, to produce his grant and show it to be genuine t. e. exhibit h...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 15 March 1845

TH1E 'POLYNESIAN E MinLlSllfiD WI2I3KLY, AT MOXOLIU , OAIIU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS. J. J. JAIIVES, EiiiTou. ADVERTISEMENTS. Public Notiee. ICT The undersigned, Executors Tes tamentary of the will of Alning, late of Honolulu deceased, Imviiiir caused the said will to he admitted to' Probate, ami having received Letters Testamentary thereon, do hereby give public notice that they are directed by the Court of Oalm, to receive and admit or contest all claims of all persons airaiust said Kstatc, during the space of sixty days from this date. For this purpose, claimants on said estate are invited to present their de mands to either of the undersigned, at their usual places of business or at their residences in Honolulu. The intention of this notice is not to barr any claimants who do not present their claims, but it is to enable the un dersigned, in presence of the Probate Judge, to pay wholly or pro-rata, the debts of said deceased, at the end of the said sixty days, or as soon there after as...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 15 March 1845

174 T II K p o L Y N K S I A N, March, tho Columbia, or about 200 miles above navigable waters. The Columbia is one of the most dangerous and difficult rivers in the world to navigate, and tho navigation can bo improved only at an immense ex pense. The time required to make the trip from Vancouver to Wallawalla, 200 miles, with loaded boats, make pottages, Stc, re quires from nine to fifteen days, according to the direction of the wind, kc. The ex pense of transportation this distance, is seven shillings sterling for 90 lbs. The expense of transporting produce down this river will also bo so great, that it will enable the Va lamet settlers to undersell and take all the profits. The only remaining method of reaching the lower country is by a road over a dilficult,mountain from the interior to the Walamct. I would remark, however, that the country lying north of the Columbia may find a more convenient outlet to tho ocean direct to Nasqually; but my remarks arc intended for the region ...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 15 March 1845

1343. THE POL Y NESi A N . towards its individual members. Perhaps the first view is nearer correct, as Mr. Brown stated that if the decision was adverse to his views he had another part to perform as a Commissioner. That all this array and studied speeching, this evading the real question before the court, and substituting complaints, reproaches and threats, on a wide vorivty of topics, should have grown out of simply the case of a sailor fined for disturbing the public peace in a drunken brawl, is quite inconceivable; or is only con ceivable on the ground of the taste which led on a former occasion, (and to which Mr. Drown alluded, as will be found in the re port,) to the selection of a most revolting case for an exertion of diplomatic skill and courtesy, which still remains unrivalled. Hut though the reporter's notes will fail to give a clear idea of the scene as it appeared to spectators, yet a judgment of the manner may he formed to some extent from the lan guage employed, and ...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 15 March 1845

176 T H K POLYNESIAN. MAncw , ADVERTISEMENTS. CJBY ORDER OF HIS MAJESTY, THE KLYO OF THE HAWAII AX ISLANDS. OrriCK of Secretary or State roR FoRKmjr Apr airs, Honolulu, Oahu, Jan. 20, 1845. ) Whereas, Itichard Charlton, a Uritish subject, pretends to claim a certain fu'ece of land in the Village of Mono ulu, which claim was referred back to the Hawaiian Islands, by Her Britannic Majesty's Government, on the 12th Sep tember 1843, to enable said Charlton to produce his grant and show it to be gen uine : Public notice is hereby given that His Majesty appoints the court of the Island of Oahu as that branch of His Govern ment to which said Charlton is to make such production and showing pursuant to Chapter 4Gofthc Hawaiian Statutes, and Chapter 47 of the Translation into English; and said Charlton is hereby required npon pain of forfeiting all claim to said land, under the decision of H. J. M's Governrnct, already mentioned, to produce his grant and show it to be genuine i. c. evhibit hi...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 22 March 1845

POL IN IAN 5JlSH! t) WEEKLY, AT HONOLULU, OAIIU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS. J. J. JARVKS, Editor. SATURDAY, MARCH 2-2, 1313. NEW SERIES, Vol. 1. No. 44. E MISCELLANEOUS. I.MAniv.vRv Virtimi. I'lie editor of tin; U. S. (Phil.) Gazette, referring to the; stone t( w1mc.Ii tin; Indian tribe; of tho Oneidas at tach a peculiar powcr(believing that wherev er their tribe has removed, it has also re moved of itself, and that so long a it is among them they will continue a separate people') beautifully throws out his own rellections upon this peculiar superstition in the follow ing language: Huston ((. S.) Transcript. 'What a lesson might one addue from the imaginary virtues of the "Oneida Stone!" Who has it not? What nation, society, family, or individual, has not some object to which it so steadily impute a virtue that, like the steel resting very near the loadstone, it becomes possessed of some of its qualities nt least, it produce. some of the effects? We treasure up the fame of a departed friend ...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Polynesian. — 22 March 1845

178 T II i; P 0 L V N KSIAN. March, and that he is acting in accordance with the designs of the government. Mr. Brown. I wish you to inform him that that is not the question, hut he most ad vise them that they have no right to inter rupt me when I am addressing him. I'ut j that as plainly as you can. ! Mr. Judo. The (Jovernor requests trie I to say that His Majesty has appointed me to assist him and if yon t! eat me with disrespect j vou disrespect him. Mr. Brown. I wish yon to tell him J mean no disrespect. Am I to have my rights ? Mr. Jt;it. Vou are not to he interrupted: when I said to the (ioveruor don't interrupt. Mr. Booardus. 1 tho't you said dont vpea!:. Mr. Jutm repeated the explanation he hud given before. Mr. Brown. This extraneous matter hav ing been done with, let us go on with the ease. According to the decisions 1 have been told of as being the law of tins court, he has a right to put away every foreigner and put only the names of those who have taken the oaths of all...

Publication Title: Polynesian
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
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