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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1903

—■p—<—*—^""^^"^"^ '' "*'-■■ ■ .'..'.."..."....1"? 1.-'."... .'.. rl .".".:. ■■'' - ''' ' ' ' ■■'-■' - - i i • ' t % jii a i i !..,!..'.>.. ' ' _^_^^^_^_^^^_ ——^^^^^^-^^M^M^^^^B I * s^^Bi. ~~~~^^^^B jiE^^^^^^^ff —■ j^^m ~^^^^^^^ Vol. XX-No. 3 D. S. TROY. If the editor of The Ranch were asked the question: "Where is the model farm of Western Washington?" his reply would be: "The Glendale Farm, in Jefferson county." Probably there are other farm owners in West ern Washington who would be ready to dispute Glendale's claim for first place, but we think if all the points of sit uation, management, productiveness and results were taken into considera tian, that our off-hand selection would be found the winner. Mr. D. S. Troy is the manager of Glendale Farm. He is, by the way, a native son, having been born at Dun geness, Clallam county, in 1870. He worked on his father's farm until the age of 19, and secured his education at the Puget Sound University, which was then located at Olymp...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1903

a GOOD BOOKS FOR FARMERS \Vt> have carefully Compiled the follow ing list of books of best agricultural books. Tor the benefit of farmers who want de tahed Information on any given subject: Kver.v book is by ■ leading authority, and the beat of its kind published. These books are sent, postpaid on receipt of price. Ad dress orders to The Kancli. Seattle. CATTLE AND DAIRYING. The Dnirvninn's Manual. By Henry Stew art. $1.50. Dadd'a American Cattle Doctor. By George 11. Dadd. M. I). $1.00. Dadd'a American Cattle Doctor. By George H. Dadd, V. S. $2.00. Milk: Its Nature and Composition. By C. 11. Aikman. M. A.. D. Sc. $1.25. Cattle Breeding. By Wm. Wnrfleld. $2.00. Common Sense Ideas for Dairymen. By George H. Blake. $1.00. Cheese Making—Cheddar, Swiss, Brick, Lim burger, Bdam, Cottage. By John W. Decker. $1.75. Pasteurization and Milk Preservation. By J. 11. Monrad. 50 cents. Diseases of Horses and Cattle. By Dr. D. Mclntosh, V. S. $1.75. Milk and Its Products. By Henry H. Wing. $1....

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1903

f tf£ RANch With which is consolidated i hp Washington Farmer, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman. official organ of the State Dairymen's Associa tion and the State Live Stock Breeders' Associa tion. MILLER FRKEMAN, - Editor and M anager. Editorial Offices: - - Seattle, Wash Tel. Main 126S—Long Distance Connection. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle - Metropolitan Bldg., Cor. Third and Main Sts. Spokane - Alexander * Co., 621 First Aye Subscription (in advance) $1.00 per year. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscrip tions. Oood commission and salaries paid. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an or der to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified in writing, by letter or postal card when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Heturning the paper will not answer, as we cannot did it on our list from the name alone on the pa per. We must have both name and address, and all arrearag...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1903

4 SCOUROE OF THE DAIRY HERD. Mr. J. M. Robbins, Marysville, Wash. Dear Sir: —Replying to your favor of the 27th inst. would say: The plan adopted by me for using carbolic acid to prevent abortion in my dairy herd in as follows: When a cow or heifer first shows the signs either by her dis charges or the untimely springing of the udder, I at once dose every cow in the herd carrying her calf up to and including the eighth month with the carbolic acid treatment, for the pei iod of one week for all that do not show the sign, and for ten days or two weeks tor all that do show the sign, unless sign sooner disappears. A dose is from 30 to 40 drops per day, depending upon the size of the animal and the condi tions of the case. I divide the dose into two feeds of from 15 to 20 drops each daily, by putting the acid in one half pint of water and mixing in bran or meal. My cows never fail to eat it in this way. Always remember what Dr. Nelson said at the association meting at Kent, that the reme...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1903

DEEP IRRIGATION. By G. M. Hawley, El Cajon, Cal. The object of irrigation is to make available the plant food that the soil may contain, for the benefit of the growing crop. This being established, the next question is the best method of securing these results. There are practically three systems of irrigation in use; the basin system, the furrow system and the subsoil, or deep irri gation system. The first two accom plish practically the same results, leaving the surface wet or saturated and require immediate cultivation as soon as the soil is dry enough to per mit, in order to produce a dry earth mulch to prevent evaporation. The advocates of this system assume that the plant food that nourishes the crop is nearly all in the surface soil, and to become available this should be kept moist. While their theory seems good, there are certain qualifying con ditions that make the practice bad, and it is not in accordance with facts. Prof. Hilgard assures us that in coun ter distinction t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1903

6 The Reformation of Dirty Bill. by Adam M. Stevens, the veteran dairyman. Being a "Creamery Patron," it is with diffidence that I attempt to say anything upon the topic assigned me. "The Creamery Patron" is usually discussed from the creamery proprietor's standpoint. Every creamery patron knows that the creamery is not a benevolent institution, but a business proposition. The first thing necessary to success is a mutual understanding tliat honesty is the only rule of acMon governing the busi ness. There must be a cordial co-operation on the part of rreameryman and patron to attain best results. There is not a creamery in the state that is getting milk enough to supply the demand for butter notwithstand ing the fact that with good cows and proper care, dairying is the most profitable branch of agriculture, in fact it is the foundation of successful agriculture. It is an old adage that you cannot eat your cake and keep it; but with good dairy cows it is better to eat the cake, i. c.,...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1903

In looking for profit, the Creamery Patron, too often starts out hind-side foremost. They look to the creamery for increase of profit instead of the farm end of the business. The 150-pound butter cow is too frequently in evidence. While she is a consumer of profits the 300-pound cow Is a large producer of profits, and with proper breeding and selection the herd may be placed above the 300-pound line. Another source of profit not properly utilized is the by products, especially the skim-milk, 16 pounds of which, fed to veal calves has produced at the rate of one pound of gain, practically 6 pounds of gain to 100 pounds of milk, which gives a value of 30 to 36 cents per hundred poun'ui of skim-milk when sold as veal, which shows that the despised little dairy bred steer is not an object to be knocked in the head as soon as it makes its appear ance. And even if fed for beef it may be made a source of profit as shown in the International Live Stock Exhi bition at Chicago, where a "Dairy...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1903

8 Horticultural Notes By F. Walden The commission men of Seattle have taken up the box question. So far as I could learn that action was taken not on ac count of anything that has been said or done by the growers but solely on account of the trouble that they have with the use of boxes of different sizes. I never knew before how many different sizes of boxes are used in this market. In the Yakima valley but two sizes are used—the Washing-ton standard and the California, but in the Puget Sound country nearly every community has its own standard. There are many small mills throughout the islands of Puget Sound and they will cut any sized box that may be ordered. Each community seems to go to one of these mills and orders the box want ed. The result is that some of the boxes are very small and are "growing beautifully less." When a retailer can buy a little box of apples from Orcas Island for 65 cts and is asked 75 cts for a much larger box from Yakima. County or Wenatchee, he will "ki...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1903

SELECTING AND PLANTING THE STOCK. The Stock. Good stock should always be insist ed upon. Such stock does not neces- Barily call for the largest plants of the kind that can be secured, but should consist of strong, healthy plants of fair size for the age, with eood roots and typical of the variety. It is false economy to secure low-grade stock simply because the first cost is a little less than that of better grades. Preparing the Land. Land can not be too carefully pre nared before it receivs the plants. This is especially true where straw berry plants or other small fruits are to be set out. The soil should be as tnoroughly pulverized as for a seed be( j Of course, in the case of or chard lands the most of the surface can be readily worked after the trees are planted, but in most cases it will be found more satisfactory to attend to all such details before any of the ground is occupied by trees or plants of any kind. Setting the Plants. If extensive areas are to be planted it will ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1903

10 BLANCHARD'S POULTRY NOTES. The longer the writer has engaged in farming the more con vinced does he become that the Western Washington farmer especially, (and the same may be true of farmers in general), to secure the results that lie within his reach, must make a study of three lines of form effort, viz.: How to produce butter fat at the lowest cost : also pork ; also eggs. This article will have to do with egg production. Like in most things the right start has a wonderful lot to do in this matter. Good, healthy and vigorous foundation stock is in dispensable. Do not attempt to keep up your flocks by an indis criminate selection of eggs for hatching. To avoid this have your breeding pens made up from your best layers. This should be done early in the season, at least a month before eggs are required for hatching; this will give the hens a chance to become contented in their new quarters; also with the cock or cockerel with which they have been mated. We find it very desirable t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1903

How one Community Choked off the Telephone Monopoly. By EDGAR L. HAMPTON, Editor Saturday Mail If our degree of savagery as a people is to be measured by the number of ur physical commodities, then we are far less savage than we were five -ears ago. The difference is that now we have both the rural mail delivery iystem, and we have the country telephone. In the West the country telephone is a new thing. As a matter of fact it is not more than a few years old in any part of this country. Within ten ars its value has become recognized in a few sections of the East, and it has J lO w come to stay in the New West. During the week of holidays just past I was in the city of Portland, Oregon, and in several of the smaller towns that the hand of thrift and enter prise has sown so thickly and so well along the two banks of the Willamette river In these smaller towns and in the country round about I became some what conversant with the history and some of the intricacies of the country teleph...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1903

za Wheat vs. Other Grains for Fattening Pigs. A little more light on wheat for hogs is given in bulletin 75 recently issued by Nebraska experiment station. A synopsis of experiments there follows: Forty-eight pigs weighing about 110 pounds each were divided into eight lots, six in a lot. After a preliminary feeding of nine days they were put on their respective rations October 21, 1901. During the experimental pe riod of thirteen weeks following this date, the food consumed in the produc tion of one pound of gain on the differ ent rations was as follows: Lot 1 —6.37 pounds of whole dry wheat. Lot 2 —5.75 pounds of soaked wheat. Lot 3 —5.59 pounds of ground wheat. Lot 4 —5.86 pounds of ground wheat and corn, equal parts. Lot 5 —6.21 pounds of ground wheat and rye, equal parts. Lot 6 —6.12 pounds of ground wheat pnd shorts, equal parts. Lot 7 —6.09 pounds of ground corn. Lot 8—6.24 pounds of ground rye. At the time this experiment was conducted, wheat and corn were each ■worth 55 cent...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1903

BREED UP YOUR HERDS. Too much can't be said on breeding uo your herds in this new dairy State. I say new dairy State, for we are just commencing, and there are many farm ers who are now laying their plans to start a dairy herd. The writer just returned from a rich little valley, where there are a half dozen farmers now making ready for the dairy business, and it is needless to say that we talked long and loud on how to begin. One of the farmers said, in answer to the question, "What kind of stock are you going to breed?" "Dam if I know. I guess mine are as good as any. They run out here in the woods and I milk 'em when they come up, and I get two buckets from each of em, and my woman makes all the butter me and the kids can eat, and a little more, too." The cows looked to me like a cross between a jackass and a moose. But let us get to the point: The man starting out should decide on some dairy breed and when his mind is made up select as good a bull as ran be had from that breed an...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1903

M The Silo. W. J. Langdon, Sumner, Wn. My task is to tell you how to build and fill a poor man's silo, such a silo as any farmer with ten or more cows can afford to build; a silo that no dairyman with ten or more cows can afford to be without, if he is not able to build a more expensive one. I will also tell some of our ex periences in dairying that led us to build a silo. We found ourselves some three or four years ago selling timothy hay and potatoes from forty acres of beaver meadow land in Puyallup val ley. Realizing that the land couldn't be kept in condition to raise profitable crops a great length of time unless we put something back on the land, we decided to get into dairying. We got a few cows and heifers. They were not an extra good lot, but would average up with the cows in the neigh borhood. We raised timothy hay and roots, bought bran and oil meal, and tried to convince ourselves that we were making money out of dairy ing. We bought a tester, weighed and tested our mil...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1903

nK were beveled so that the doors »-ould shut in tight. A coat of tarred * er was then nailed to the boards, hen another course of matched wards were put on, breaking joints v ith the first course. The last course it boards was dropped back about an nch all around the openings in order o make a double joint for the doors. L'o fastenings of any kind are needed |o hold the doors tight, the pressure )t the silage will do that. Some think it necessary to draw doors to their places with bolts. We hinged ours on. When silo is filled to door it is closed and silage tramped against It. We have had no trouble. After Ihe boards were all on cement was filled under the ends of boards and, upon the boards an inch or two, to prevent leaking. Before we began filling the silo some poor hay was spread over the bottom, thinking silage would rot on the bottom of silo, rat it did not. The cattle ate the last >f the silage and also the hay, al ;hough they were on good pasture. Our peas and oats were ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1903

i 6 Bovina, the Almost Deathless. A correspondent writing to the New York Sun under date of January 13, says: The following newspaper clipping gives an official list of all the deaths in the town of Bovina, Delaware coun ty, New York, for the year 1902: Date. Name. Age. Jan. 1, James O. McCune 75 Jan. 27, Mary Russell 74 Feb. 22, William D. Thompson 90 Feb. 26, James O. Clark 73 March 24, Margaret James 62 July 13, Margaret Thompson 84 Aug. 7, Mary A. Storie 92 Aug. 13, Christina E. Johnson 74 Sept. 15, Frank R. Coulter 62 Sept. 27, Walter Amos 65 Dec. 29, Walter A. Doig 76 The town of Bovina is as remark able in other matters as in the longev ity of its inhabitants. Founded, not like Rome, on seven hills, but upon thirteen, it is especially adapted for dairying purposes, and was selected by the State Dairymen's Association as the proper place to take a "cow census," by which it appeared that the average production of butter for the whole town was 241.8 pounds per cow, while in one ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1903

.. , ' j , _ MuuiuniniLMiiuuiiuiijiiuiii ; ii■ ," m .... lljli!.!!!;. '' ■,' " "iK'jjjjfr^ Vol. XX--10. * ARTHUR GUNN. There is no section in the North west that can show a more rapid or substantial progress during the last five years than the Wenatchee valley. The farming land there today brings the highest price of any in the North west. The town of Wenatchee itself has grown from a handful of people to quite a thriving city of two thousand and will reach within the near future, a population of five thousand, or more. A good deal of the credit for this development The Ranch gives to Arthur Gunn. It was he who built the first irrigating canal of importance in the valley, and thereby put into cul tivation a large body of land that be fore had been but a stretch of desert. He came of old Kentucky stock. Grad uated in 1888 at Park College, near Kansas City. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Brown in 1890, and has six little Gunns. He had considerable newspaper experience, including im ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1903

* GOOD BOOKS FOR FARMERS We have carefully compiled the follow ing list of books of best agricultural books, for the benefit of farmers who want de tailed information on any given subject: Kvery book Is by a leading authority, and the DMt of its kind published. These books are sent, postpaid on receipt of price. Ad dress orders to The Ranch, Seattle. CATTLE AND DAIRYING. The Dairyman's Manual. By Henry Stew art. $1.50. Dadd's American Cattle Doctor. By George H. Dadd, M. D. $1.00. Dadd's American Cattle Doctor. By George 11. Dadd, V. S. $2.00. Milk : Its Nature and Composition. By C. M. Aikunan, M. A., D. Sc. $1.25. Cattle Breeding. By Wm. Warfield. $2.00. Common Sense Ideas for Dairymen. By George H. Blake. $1.00. Cheese Making—Cheddar Swiss, Brick, Lim burger, Edam, Cottage. By John W. Decker. $1.75. Pasteurization and Milk Preservation. By J. H. Monrad. 50 cents. Diseases of Horses and Cattle. By Dr. D. Mclntosh, V. S. $1.7. r >. Milk and Its Products. B>y Henry H. Wing. $1...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1903

f tfeRANCh With which Is consolidated The Washington Farmer, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman. official organ of the State Dairymen's Associa tion and the State Live Stock Breeders' Associa tion. MILLER FREEMAN, - Editor and Managpr. Editorial Offices: ■ ■ ■ Seattle, Wash Tel. Main 1266—Long Distance Connection. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. BUSINESS OFFICES: Spattle - - Metropolitan Bldg., Seattle and MalQ &ta Spokane - Alexander A Co., 621 First Aye Subscription (In advance) f 1.00 per year. Agents wanted In every town to solicit subscrip tions. Uood commission and salaries paid. The paper Is sent to each subscriber until an or der to discontinue Is received from the subscriber. We must be notified In writing, by letter or postal card when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Ketu'ruing the paper will not answer, as we cannot titid It on our list from the name alone on the pa per. We must have both name and address, and hi 1 ar...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1903

4 The Silo Is Coming. The silo discussion following Mr. Langdon's paper on "The Silo" at the recent meeting at Kent, of the State Dairyman's Association, for the first time in the history of the Association seemed to evoke a general interest. It is evidence of the thought and study of the dairymen along their line of work beginning to blossom. Soon will come the full bloom, and then the fruit. While as a general rule "go slow" is good advice to follow in such matters, when it once becomes sufficiently demonstrated that the silo has a plc.ee in the dairyman's busi ness, that cannot profitably be dispens ed with, then further delay is unjus tifiable. It is the writer's opinion, based upon his personal experience, that there is no other improvement the dairymen can make that will bring in such satisfactory and beneficial results. There, however, are sundry prob lems in connection with the silo dairy ing that it will take time to solve. For instance: Which is to become our great silo cr...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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