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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 15 June 1987

Page 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JUNE, 1984 JOHN STOWELL HYLTON - MY DAD This story is in loving memory of my father, John Stowell Hylton. Dad was a quiet, gentle and humble person. As an outdoors person, he was the happiest when working close to the land and nature. His father died very young so Dad had to take on a lot of responsibility as a young boy. My earliest memory as a child is going over the farm with Dad working a team of oxen and doing little chores. I loved to go fishing with him in the "River Road" streams. We had to walk miles to get there. It was so beautiful and wildflowers were everywhere. As a child I remember all the beauty I saw on the River Road and it's a picture in my mind yet. Dad loved these mountains so much. We used to play in the snow. Dad could make some of the biggest smowmen I ever saw. When there was ice over the snow, we would spend a whole evening riding a board down the hill. What fun this was. And those buckets of ice cream made in a big dishpan of snow m...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 15 June 1987

W.M.DALTON Master Watch Repairman W.M. Dalton was born in Wythe County, Virginia, April 27, 1905, at a small comnunity called Bertha. His father was a forman in the iron mines. In 1918 the mine shut down and his father was out of a job. His father got a job as a section hand on the railroad. It ran beside of their home near Sylvatus, Virginia and went from Reed Junction to the Betty Baker Mines. From that time on, the railroad has played a large part in his life. Mr. Dalton is quick to point out that he is mostly a self - educated man. He said his mother taught him to read and he didn't enter school until he was 13. He was placed in the third grade at first and moved to the fourth grade shortly after. The school he attended was near Route 100 and called Patterson School. By the time he was 14, Mr. Dalton was working sunmers on the railroad. He put in spikes, carried cross ties and did maintenance work in general. He said he worked til his hands were solid blisters and kept on going....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 15 June 1987

Page 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JUNE, 1984 Continued from page 19. it needed. I put a piece of cigarette paper under the head of the cock. The balance wheel was perfect. I set it by a railroad conductor's watch. One week later, it wasn't off more than five seconds. I went back to the mill and the Lawyer was waiting. He was so pleased with it that he told everybody around what a fine watch repairman I was. I didn't know anything about watches but I figured if I was going to work on them, I had better learn. I ordered a book and a repair kit from a catalog and started studying. I remember the first time I tightened a cannon pinion. I had nothing to tighten it with. I pulled a hair out of my arm and pushed it through the cannon pinion and replaced it on the center staff where it belonged. It worked!" Along about this time his first marriage was in trouble. He divorced and later maried his present wife in 1941. He had seven children by his first marriage and she did too. Together, they have thr...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 15 June 1987

"WALKING" CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4. was moving north and I was going along. He aggred that this was logical but it took another half hour to get away. For a man whose wife was in the hospital for an operation and a boy almost hopelessly shell shocked he was remarkably cheerful. He said that Meadows of Dan "were about" three short miles away. My estimate was more, but the icy rain squalls may have been a factor. At the store I bought supplies, then stood by the pot-bellied stove to warm up. The storekeeper recalled a shelter at Rocky Knob, a few miles up the Parkway and I determined to reach there if possible. Weather was clearing as I soon came to Mabry Mill and stopped to take a picture. In the old days this was the center of activity in the mountain corrmunity, including grist mill, sawmill, and cider press, along with the nearby Wheelwright and Blacksmith shops. The wheel was about fifteen feet high, overshot, and fed from a long wooden spillway. The area is maintained by the Park S...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 15 June 1987

Page 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JUNE, 1984 MOUNTAIN REMEDIES - Sure To Cure Or Kill After years of observation and a considerable amount of research, I am convinced that the roots of modern medicine can be traced to the older citizens of the "Bible Belt". It appears that an often quoted passage of scripture may have given birth to the idea of professional healing. When I was a boy the scriptural admonition, "physician, heal thyself," was the most abused bit of advice in the Book. As a matter of fact, this verse of scripture sort of became the "Hypocratic Oath" of the hills. Knowledge of this verse seemed to be the only qualification many of the country folks needed to launch them on a career of healing. Not only did they try to heal themselves, they expanded this advice to include their children, their neighbors, their mules and any stranger who sojourned in their midst. Anything or anybody who seemed to be "under the weather" was a candidate for their medical practice. This zeal for healin...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 15 June 1987

N. Loomt St. FLOYD; VA 24091 °D Hours: 8-5:30 Monday -Saturday Phone 745-2822 QUALITY LOG HOMES AT AFFORDABLE PRICES The Beautiful, Natural Way To Live THE SHAWNEE IMPROVED LOG HOME PACKAGE * Pfe-cut Rough Sawn Rafters Huttig and Plat6S insulated Windows With """ *'s** ' ' • Ridge Beam and Snow Blocks _ • Hardboard Splines THE LEXINGTON . Gasketing 24' x 40' 2 STORY 1920 SQ. FT. I bSLSXs^^ The Lexington offers room for families, room for entertaining and # our Hours °f Building room for guests. The Lexington covers an overall area of 1920 Supervision square feet and features four bedrooms on the second floor, two OPTIONS: baths, and a spacious living room. The long front porch promises • Dormers Of Any Length room to relax and enjoy the great outdoors. For those who require • Storm Doors additional room, a larger version of The Lexington is available. • Erection Crew information available upon request Send $4.00 (Check or Money order) for the complete SH/WVNEE LOG HOME Planning Port...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 15 June 1987

Page 24 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JUNE, 1984 WgmmlL f. i r "- TN» , ■; KEMPER BRYANT Basket Maker For years Kemper Bryant of Galax, Virginia enjoyed going to auction sales and antique hunting. The thing he looked for first and interested him most was old handmade baskets. As this interest grew, he decided he would learn how to make baskets himself. Not just any style but the old time ways of making baskets. Kemper contacted an older gentleman, Delbert Burnett of Woodlawn, Virginia who is known in these parts as one of the best basketmakers. Mr. Burnett has been making baskets for most of his life. During the big depression, Mr. Burnett said he would load up as many baskets as he could carry on his arms, walk to Galax from Woodlawn and go door to door trying to sell his baskets for 350 each. He also caned chair bottoms. He would take a big armfull of white oak splits and go door, to door recaning chairs for 250 each. When Kemper Bryant approached Delbert Burnett about teaching him to make bask...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 15 June 1987

WAYNE BANKS AND PERSEVERANCE Wayne Banks is 79 years old and makes his home in Christiansburg, Virginia. When he was 14 in 1919, I doubt if he had ever read Horatio Alger's advice to young men on seeking their fortune. Wayne did just that and this will be a continuing serial story about his venture out into the world. It is wonderfully detailed. He sat down and told me the story over the course of about, five hours. It reads like a diary. It is a story of ingenuity and preserverance, a will that found a way In 1919, when Wayne Banks was 14 years old, he decided it was time to go out and seek his fortune. He had graduated from the seventh grade and that was as high as the schooling went in his neighborhood near Galax, Virginia. The day he left, his mother gave him $2.50 to take with him. Wayne says to this day, he doesn't know where she could have got it. He didn't just start out "hit or miss". He was going to Winston-Salem, North Carolina and try to get a job at Hanes Knitting Mill....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 15 June 1987

Page 26 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JUNE, 1984 BACKROADS Continued from page 28. miles we've traveled from the point of begining. There are plenty of places to enjoy a picnic along the way and for the trout fishermen and women, you might as well carry your fishing gear along because you'll regret it if you don't. A wild flower book and a camera are also recorrmended. This month the town of Stuart is celebrating its 100 th anniversary and local merchants, along with Stuart's two weekly newspapers, The Bull Mountain Bugle and The Enterprise, are planning special events. Stuart was once the center of corrmerce for a large part of this area of "The Heart of the Blue Ridge". Prior to World War 11, there was a railroad here and wagon loads of chestnuts and other farm products were shipped from here to the larger cities eastward. The railway has been gone for many years as well as the chestnuts, but the small town of Stuart has clung to its little town ways and even today, most of the businesses close...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 15 June 1987

Continued from page 26. and the lower mouth of the Dan River Gorge. 32.5 We will continue straight ahead on State Road 648, but notice the little road turning right here (State Road 631). At one time, this was a main road that wound its way to the top of the mountain up Rainy Gap to the Busted Rock section. 33.4 From here on till the road dead ends at the end of Kibler Valley, we will be following the Dan River upstream toward the Gorge. 3#.4 This is the end of the road and we must turn around and head back downstream. The Hydro Electric Plant is small by modern comparisons and was built by the City of Danville during the early 1930'5. The small group of homes located at the end of the road belong to the city and they are the residences of the plant personel. This has to be one of the most picturesque places in the eastern United States. 43.7 Backtracking the way we came, we will take a shortcut here and turn right onto State Road 631 which is unpaved. 45-6 The old road turning up t...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 15 June 1987

Meadows of Dan, Virginia HEART OF THE BLUE RIDGE tfJie "fcoWwfa Jiaurel **" ■ cL Copyright 1983 Mountain lourel A self-guided monthly tour of Mountain Backroads PCD !, OS 4^3 BACKROADS by because of fear of getting lost. Each month this column eliminates this concern by giving directions over mountain backroads to some of the most picturesque places throughout the "Heart of the Blue Ridge". Whether you're a resident or a long distance neighbor, we're sure you will enjoy this area's beauty. "Never take the main roads, they're the future with their stores, offices and service stations. Always travel the backroads. You'can see the future tomorrow but backroads are the past and someday they may be gone. On backroads you can see old weathered barns with wagons and horse drawn hayrakes. There are meadows fenced with old chestnut rails and creeks that bubble and cascade over rocks that have never known pollution. There's a part of our heritage on our backroads that no pen or camera will ev...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1987

JULY, 1987 s^Kouk£di/z V WW'.'! fTHLY JOURNAL OF MOUNTAIN LIFE © I'B6 LAUREL PUBLICATIONS INC. unfa?.'% JLai/r'gZ MONTHLY JOURNAL OF MOUNTAIN LIFE Molly stretched her aching back. That day, starting such a long time ago and with such laughter had lingered on in silence. The three of them concentrated on the process... walk, reach down, lift, put together. Walk, reach down, lift, put together. At last the sun was going down. It had hung there, in vibrating heat for those endless hours of walk, reach down, lift, put together. "Almost dark," Robert breathed. Molly looked at his tired face, streaked with dust and sunburned beneath his straw hat. He had kept up with them all day and the set of his chin let her know he intended to finish with them - or else. Frank's voice was barely audible, "We can do a few more." Robert and Molly nodded. They walked to the next bundle of grain, gleaming golden in the deepening twilight. They made ten more shocks before darkness overtook them. With weary...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1987

PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JULY, 1987 It was a hot July afternoon in 1936. On our farm in Ritchie County, West Virginia, near the village of Auburn, my Dad, two of our neighbors, and I were storing hay in our barn so we could feed our cattle the following winter. Today farmers bale their hay, but we didn't know what a baler was in those days, so all of our hay was loose. On that particular occasion, we had to store an estimated forty-five tons, which took up a lot more space than baled hay does. To get the hay into the barn, we used a hay fork that ran on a track secured to the inside roof of the hay mow and protruded out over the front of the barn. As a triprope lowered the two-pronged fork to the ground, one man inserted it into a pile of hay loaded on a sled drawn by two horses. Unhitching both horses from the sled, we hooked on to the rope that continuously revolved, transferring the hay from the sled to the hay mow before returning to the fork track for another load of hay. We had ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1987

CROSSING BOTTOM CREEK BY: LOIS S. POFF © 1987 My husband grew up in Floyd, County, near Thrash's Mountain, a section of Virginia where Floyd, Montgomery, and Roanoke Counties meet. The mountain was named for my mother's great, great grandfather, John Thrash, a sixteen year old pioneer who walked up from Tennessee in 1797, married Lydia Cole, daughter of Joseph Cole, a Revolutionary War soldier, and settled on the mountain. In 1928 my father-in-law, Archie Poff, went down on Bottom Creek in Roanoke County and bought a sawmill from Mr. Hode Funk. At the time he moved the sawmill, it was inconvenient to move the saw, so he just left it down there. In a few days he told my husband, Herman, who was twelve and Eldredge who was a few years older to take the wagon and go get the saw. It was a long ways from their home but Eldredge knew the way for he had been with his father when he moved the sawmill. Back then, Bottom Creek, a tributary to South Fork of Roanoke River, was a right deep cree...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1987

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JULY, 1987 Frizzly Bill McCoy said he learned the art from his "pappy" and "gran'pappy". He was unaware that his ancestors had made whiskey in the highlands of Scotland long before any of them crossed the Atlantic to find new homes in Virginia's Highlands. Far up a pine-scented hollow beside a clear mountain stream the moonshiner sets up his still. Amid the beauties of nature he carried on his profession in a leisurely way - his only concern to keep his business hidden from the prying eyes of "the law". Time was when many moonshine stills operated in the western Virginia mountains. These were generally pot type copper stills with a copper "worm" coiled into a "worm box" into which was sluiced cold water from a nearby spring or mountain stream. The still - loaded with "mash" (corn meal fermented in water) - sat over a stone fireplace. Steam from the boiling mash jinked through the coiled copper worm and was condensed into liquid as the worm passed through the c...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1987

FLOYD COUNTY, VIRGINIA The very best of the BLUE/y\ Local Arts and Crafts • Mountain Culture • Rare Plants • Abundant Wildlife • Mountain Farms • Fresh Streams Fishing • Hiking • Camping • Craft Shops • Country Stores • Bluegrass Music • Art Gallery tl' " Friendly Country Folks • Restaurants • Lodging • Bed and Breakfast Inns • Bicycling • Christmas Shops '"***'****' Festivals • Picnic Areas • Historic Sites • Hunting • Swimming • Bird Watching • Christmas Tree Capital of Va. MabryMiii, Floyd county (Miiepost 176.1 B.R.P) HOW TO GET TO FLOYD COUNTY, VIRGINIA: l""[ "* V"" /nn" •From NC: Take either Blue Ridge Parkway or 221 North 30 miles from Roanoke, VA Blue Ridge Parkway NC - interstate 77' jfllk rJTUUKX loLCI lUIJ Interstate 77. Blue Ridge Parkway traverses the entire county. S- T>! •From Blue Ridge Parkway: North on Rt. 8 at Milepost 165.2 I Miiepost 165.2 / j Bed and Breakfast •From Interstate 81: Exit 36 (Christiansburg). South on Rt. 822 miles I 8 (/ Miiepost 153 (...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1987

PACiE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JULY, 1987 OZARK DREAMS AND MOUNTAIN MEMORIES This is a serialized, true story of a poor Ozark family in the 1930's through the eyes of one of their children. Experience their hardship and heart warming togetherness as they struggle through and celebrate life in the Ozark Mountains. In the summer of 1935, on a hot Saturday afternoon, our world was shaken as though we had been hit by a bolt of lightning. In a way it was more surprising to me than that, for I had never even dreamt that something like that could happen to us. The disaster affected all of the family but as I look back, I recall feeling as though I had literally been thrown through a door from my childish, carefree world into a world of almost unsolvable adult problems. The things that happened, were said, and done during the next few months formed a backlog of unforgettable memories which affected almost all of my decisions the rest of my life. Even now I vividly remember the hot Saturday afterno...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1987

OZARK DREAMS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6. the corn crib. Ben had come back from town with Papa and Earl. He was explaining what had happened. He said the letter said that Will Jenkins was going to move in our house in October and that we had to move out before then. Earl and Andy both spoke at once and said they'd shoot the first person who drove through our gate trying to take over our farm. Earl jumped off the wagon picking up a stick of wood and whammed it against the side of the corn crib. Ben stood up, looking wise and weary beyond his years; he patiently tried to explain that it was no longer our farm; that the letter was from a layer, and if we didn't move, the law would come and put Papa in jail; then they would move Mama and us children out of the house. April asked where we would move to. Ben said he didn't know. Earl began cussing real bad. He said he'd beat hell out of the whole Jenkins family; he picked up a single tree and with a wild bang broke it over a wagon wheel. We you...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1987

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JULY, 1987 OZARK DREAMS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7. world. It's stream of water held mysterious secrets that produced a fertile, pregnant mass of floating, wiggling, crawling, creeping, hopping forms of life that changed day by day. All us children had spent endless hours playing in or just looking into that water. Every spring and summer we kept a careful watch over the quantity and progress of frog eggs that were deposited in the warm, shallow at the edge of the deep pond that formed down at the foot of the hill. We watched the newly hatch tadpoles grow until they shed their wiggly fish-like tails and began hopping around out of the water on legs that came from only heaven knows where. We watched the crayfish build their tall mud chimneys along the edge of puddles. We watched the yearly parade of mother quail and killdear as they cautiously lead their fluffy baby chicks, no bigger than a thimble, noiselessly through the grass to drink from the cool water. At nigh...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 July 1987

TURN RIGHT BEFORE YOU GET TO THE CHURCH It was a few years later when we again went to visit Uncle Sam and other relatives of my Mother's who lived in the hills along the Ohio River. The year was either 1925 or 1926, just after my Father had traded the old Model-T Ford for a Maxwell. My Mother's brother John went with us on this trip. Froih home, we headed south and crossed the Ohio River at Beaver, Pennsylvania. We then drove overland to Wierton, >y.Va., located on the Ohio River. We then followed the river down to Clarington, Ohio, crossing over into Ohio at Wheeling. Until we crossed the river the trijp was uneventful. We were just a few south of Wheeling (Bellaire) when it started to rain. This called for a stop to on the isinglass curtains. The windshield wipers were hand operated and the reduced visibility caused our rate of speed to be considerably reduced (When I see the Laurel and Hardy TV about their piano moving, I recall this trib). When we left the macadam ro...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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