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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1997

March 1997 Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. I Due to space limitations, ads will be published on a first-come, first-served basis. I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. > Please TYPE or PRINT your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. (You do not have to use this coupon.) » Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. > DEADLINE: Ads must be received by the lOTH of each month preceding the publication month. > Repeat ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. (Please submit ads to the Farm Bureau News before the 10th.) NAME: MEMBER NO.: COUNTY: ADDRESS: CITY: STATE: ZIP: DAYTIME PHON...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1997

Farm Bureau News The Farmers Market (Continued from page 13) TREADMILL -- manual with cassette and phones $85 804-696-3410 or Box 402. Victor, 23974. BOAT — glassmaster I 6' fiberglass, open bow. Mercury ob. trailer Price negotiable 804-353-3114. FOR SALE — old eye glasses, metal frames 30-50 pair 540-396-6254 FOR SALE -- hooked on phonics, new. still in box. $150.540-547-3577 after 6:00 p.m. SINGER TINY TAILOR — electric sewing machine. Brand new! $40. plus $5 shipping and handling. 757-654-6355. FOR SALE — wonderful peas, harvest September. $1.50 per pound. 804-729-2403. AUCTIONEER SERVICES - Tignor auctioneering. Call Troy Tlgnor. Uc 2351. 804-448-3515. Selling land, farms, estates, antiques, collections. WANTED TO BUY — bandsaw that will accept 12-inch work between table and guides. 540-885-3076 or 800-340-3076. GOLF CLUBS -- Wilson reflex irons, 2-PW, new grips, great condition. 804-379-6497, ask for Scott. WANTED — old pedal car or tractor for little brother, even needing repa...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1997

March 1997 Tidewater center developing better crops (Continued from poge 9) pathologist at the center. The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation helped pay for some monitors. Weather information goes to Info Net and farmers can access it from home computers and even download information onto their computers. Info Net helps researchers and farmers predict when crops are most susceptible to diseases and frost. Info Net also gives daily rainfall, seasonal rainfall, air temperature ranges and the last effective spray date for peanut leaf spot. This advisory alone saves an average of $3 million annually in fungicide costs and reduces the tonnage of chemical use on peanuts by 150 tons. Researchers at the center and Virginia Tech are studying pigs that are stress gene carriers, said Dr. Allen Harper, Extension swine specialist. These pigs tend to overreact to being handled and loaded onto trucks. Females with the gene don't reproduce as consistently as noncarriers. A major advantage of raising s...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1997

Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Choice: Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? Best Value Now you can choose a plan which will give you the coverage you For Your Dollar: need... and will fit your budget. We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. \ Personal Service: With over 100 local Farm Bureau offices throughout Virginia, \ \ personalized service can be as close as your own community. Je* R , w r Health Care Coverage 0 I road Kange OI # jf y OU are unc j er a g e 55 — £ or Individuals or families # Coverage • If you are over age 65 — Medicare supplement • If you are a small business — coverage for 2-99 employees. HE£IIE3 You choose the health care plan that fits your needs... and your budget! UhJ®

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1997

Farm Bureau Volume 56, Number 3 Labor study to examine migrant workers' role By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist A proposed study to determine the importance of migrant, seasonal and H-2A farmworkers could provide vital information to the agriculture industry. "We've always known there's a lack of domestic labor and how vital migrant and seasonal and H-2A workers are to our industry," said Channy Franko, an assistant public affairs director for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "This study will provide the hard facts." Theron Bell, chairman of the Virginia Interagency Migrant Worker Policy Committee, submitted a proposal to the Virginia Agricultural Council to fund a study on the economic impact of migrant and seasonal farmworkers and H--2A agricultural workers in Virginia. The $35,000 study is scheduled to begin May 1 and conclude Dec. 1. If approved, Virginia Tech employees will conduct the research. The study's objectives are to: determine the economic contribution o...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1997

Farm Bureau News Plan for the fire you hope you'll never have By CHRIS BAXTER VFBF Writer/Graphic Designer Reacting fast to a house fire is smart, but taking steps to prevent a fire is even better, said a home safety expert. "Home fires occur on a daily basis across the United States," said Virginia Farm Bureau Safety Coordinator Bruce Stone. "We need to prepare ourselves." This was the message that Stone and his staff often gave during safety presentations to more than 5,200 people around the state last year. Installing early-warning devices is the first step toward preventing disaster, he explained. These devices include smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. Most fatal house fires occur at night as occupants sleep. Fortunately, smoke detectors wake people up before they are trapped or overcome by smoke. In fact, detectors reduce the risk of dying in a house fire by nearly 50 percent, Stone said. But installing a smoke detector is not enough. One-third of the smoke detectors, also c...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1997

April 1997 Electric power changes may reach farms During the 1930s residents of bustling cities and sleepy towns across the Old Dominion were discovering an incredible new technology that would change the face of the world forever. No longer would these citizens and businesses be in the dark, so to speak. No longer would many laborious tasks have to be done by hand. Meanwhile, resourceful farmers and rural merchants struggled to catch up with this new modern efficiency. They organized so that they could receive government loans to erect power lines and bring into their lives this new miracle technology called electricity. By 1936 Virginia's first nonprofit utility corporation was in business and shortly thereafter, with help from President Franklin D. Roosevelt, some rural residents in Virginia received electricity for the first time. Later they bought their first refrigerator and no Ag curriculum can open doors for students Editor's note: The following editorial was published recen...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1997

Farm Bureau News Cattle producers try out latest beef entrees By SANDY HEVENER Special to the Farm Bureau News HOT SPRINGS—CattIe producers who gathered in Virginia's mountains for an annual meeting tasted new products created to accommodate Americans' changing lifestyles. It was part of the Virginia Cattlemen's Association Convention at the Homestead Feb. 20-22. "Consumers have changed a lot —people want to spend 20 to 30 minutes to fix something with six to eight ingredients," Cindy Boggs said. She is director of consumer information and beef promotion for the Virginia Cattle Industry Board She spoke about research, product development and marketing changes funded by check-off dollars in partnerships with com-mon-interest groups. Recent polls show 71 percent of working wives have not decided what they are going to have for supper by 4 p.m. Teens prepare 50 percent of the meals and are responsible for 70 percent of the decisions as to what the meal will State's pastures have big po...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1997

April 1997 HpP^ mmrnm^ >^! l ,„ "««"- ~™™*> i * — i 9HMHHB n ■Tim - HHP v I .. : i Buy a new Dodge Truck and pick up a ton of cash. Up To $500 Cash Back To Farm Bureau Members. extra $300 to $500 in the deal. $500 cash back on '96 and '97 Ram Vans and As a member, you quality tor $300 back on Ram Wagons. That's on top of any other all new 1996 and 1997 5.9 L V-8 Magnum Ram national Dodge cash back offer* All you need 1500 pickups. to do is get a certificate from your states Farm y. ■' $500 back on' 96 Bureau validating that you've been a member JBtttiJr and '97 Ram for at least thirty days. Then stop by your 2500 and 3500 Dodge dealer. Where you'll discover it pays to mm 5.9LV-8, tThis cash hack offer is valid for members of participating Farm Bureaus, is scheduled '' v " Bm 8 ' " ~# jgNjl f-. p.. . to expire 9/30/97, and is subject to change. It may not be used in combination with any LUmminS L/lesel other ChryslerCoiporation certificate program or certain oth...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1997

Farm Bureau News Viewing Virginia Environmentally friendly sheep help control weeds Sears may sell a different model, but sheep are the original weed eaters. Sheep eat weeds, brush and other undergrowth in pastures and forests that other animals either can't get to or won't eat. Dr. Steve Sharrow, an Oregon State University rangeland professor, told American Sheep Industry Convention attendees Jan. 16 that in Canada, sheep producers are paid for their ewes to graze tim-ber-harvested areas where fastgrowing weeds threaten to stunt young trees' growth. "Sheep are favored over herbicides when it comes to reducing the amount and growth of weeds in forests," Sharrow said. Sharrow added that studies have proven that trees in areas where sheep graze have a greater growth rate, ranging from 9 percent to 61 percent above average. Soybeans predicted to be hot commodity for 1997 RICHMOND—When it comes to high prices and strong demands soybeans could be the hot commodity for 1997. Since early t...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1997

April 1997 Presenting... The DR® FIELD ancK /> BRUSH MOWER / / \ ~ the amazing walk-behind jj / / / , ! f „ , II m M £ * POWERFUL brush cutter that — I t/I shp Bnggs & • CLEARS & MAINTAINS meadows, i / pastures, roadsides, fences, wooded j ; gjW Starting. BIG 20" SELFrough non-lawn areas with ease. PROPELLED WHEELS Mows over 1/2 acre per hour! Mr \ / rolls through ditches, • CUTS tall grass, weeds, furrows, over bumps brush, brambles, sumac - 1 v \ '°§ s w ' t^l easep\)pn tmi oh snnlinos 1 VARIABLE SPEED PHOPS/ style woodlots free undergrowth... vn i puL\ . walking paths... or any area that you only , most want to mow once a month... or once a season! everything it cuts; leaves made NO TANGLE of material IN USA Sq WHy mess wUh hand . held brU shcutters that to trip over or to pick up are so dangerous, slow and tiring to use... OR like hand-held brushcutters with sicklebar mowers that shake unmercifully and sicklebar mowers. and i eave such a tangle...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1997

Farm Bureau News Hog producers are protecting environment By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor SMITHFIELD—Hogs once roamed the woods on Jerry E. Dashiell Jr.'s farm, and the odor occasionally wafted through downtown Smithfield. That was back In the 19705, and things have changed. Dashiell now keeps his 2,500 hogs confined in buildings that are warm in the winter and cool in the summer. The odor seldom leaves the farm. Manure is stored in a pit below the building and pumped to a nearby lagoon the size of a tiny fish pond. As the manure partly decomposes in the lagoon, its odor becomes milder. The decomposing manure is spread as a nutrientrich fertilizer on Dashiell's nearby crop fields. Concern about the Commonwealth's hog industry surfaced during the Virginia General Assembly in January. Lawmakers pointed to problems that have occurred in North Carolina's hog industry. They called for an ad hoc study of the hog industry's impact on producers and the environment in Virginia. In 199...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1997

April 1997 Mites killed many of Virginia's honey bees (Continued from page 1) ing Committee. The number of honey bee colonies in Virginia has been declining over the last two decades, but the situation has gotten worse in recent years, said State Apiarist Frank Fulgham. In 1985, Virginia had 2,500 beekeepers and approximately 80,000 colonies of honey bees, Fulgham said. In 1996, the number of beekeepers dropped to i,200 and the number of bee colonies had decreased to 35,000. Figures from the Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service, which keeps track of beekeepers with five or more hives, are even lower. There were only 7,000 honey bee colonies in 1996, down from 30,000 honey bee colonies 10 years ago, according to VASS. In addition, at least 90 percent of Virginia's wild honey bees have been killed by mites and viruses, Fulgham explained. "It will be very serious for agriculture if the (honey) bee population continues to decline," Fulgham said. "We need them for food production." H...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1997

Farm Bureau News Confidence is vital, speaker says By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist CHARLOTTESVILLE —Farm Bureau women have many opportunities to educate people about agriculture, but they need confidence to do it. "There are people out there who don't understand what we do and they're not only having influence over us, but they're determining whether or not we exist," said lolene Brown, an lowa farmer. She led a workshop on "The Confident Woman" at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Annual Statewide Women's Conference March 2-4. "That is why we need you—the confident woman—to educate the urban community," Mrs. Brown said (See Annual, Page 14) Important Breakthrough in Natural Prostate Relief (Special Report) Researchers warn that men over 40 who are free of ° ur Customers have Said prostate gland disorders face 2 to I odds that Prostsafe® helps tO! they will suffer symptoms before they reach 1 - ggfesl *. ? 59. And prostate surgery is the second most Ha , t the endl...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1997

April 1997 Revival of farmer group pays off When Matt Lohr agreed to head Rockingham County Young Farmers' Committee in September 1995, he didn't know what he was about to undertake. But that didn't stop him from tripling the committee's membership in a little more than a year. And he was rewarded for his efforts at the annual statewide Young Farmers' Conference in January. With Lohr and wife Andrea as chairmen, the Rockingham County Young Farmers' Committee received the Most Outstanding Young Farmer Committee Award for 1996. "We haven't done anything that any other committee couldn't do," he said. When Lohr took over as chairman, the committee had only seven members, but the only active member was its chairman, he said. So, Education of non-farmers is part of new law (Continued from page 1) approach toward dealing with water quality," said Wilmer Stoneman, an assistant director of public affairs for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "It basically addresses people head-on on our ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1997

Farm Bureau News Beef products sampled (Continued from page 4) of Agriculture and Consumer Services and helps handle complaints about farming practices. The Agriculture Stewardship Act involves guidelines which apply only to agriculture activities that are causing or will cause water pollution by sedimentation, nutrients or toxins. Other things people complain aboutthings such as farm odors or conditions caused by unusual weather —do not fall into the jurisdiction of the act. "We will only address complaints, not things seen when we come out that have not been reported," Martin said. "Anyone can file a complaint and hopefully we can weed out neighbors being picky," Martin said. "If they give their name, we will probably be out." Farmers will receive ample time to correct problems. He said officials responding to anonymous complaints may . _ PMN KVLLER It works better than.. a pain pill! Rising Dental Costs Are Becoming A Headache For The Family Budget! The Virginia Farm Bureau can o...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1997

April 1997 (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. > Please TYPE or PRINT your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. (You do not have to use this coupon.) I Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I DEADLINE: Ads must be received by the lOTH of each month preceding the publication month. > Repeat ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. (For your convenience we are providing this coupon. Please submit ads to the Farm Bureau News before the 10th.) NAME: MEMBER NO.: COUNTY: ADDRESS: CITY: STATE: ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER: ( ) ADVE...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1997

Farm Bureau News Annual conference draws 230 (Continued from page 10) as she strode back and forth across the room. "We need to educate, communicate, arbitrate and mediate," Mrs. Brown emphasized. "Farmer Brown," as she refers to herself, led the 230 women through exercises that boost confidence levels. The lessons were interspersed with both funny and touching anecdotes. "You don't have to shout your strengths," Mrs. Brown said. "But you must know them because the world will tell you your weaknesses." Watch out for jealousy, she said. "If you want what someone else has; make a plan, set a goal," Mrs. Brown advised. Written goals are very important, she State's decline of honey bees draws concern (Continued from page 9) ing trouble educating new beekeepers and some of the older beekeepers." To treat Tracheal Mites, beekeepers place menthol crystals in the hives in August. The bees breathe the vapors from the crystals and the vapor kills the mites. Varroa mites are treated with Apist...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1997

April 1997 Revolutionary "2-in-1" , \) Takes the place of both your hand- W I J held trimmer and rotary mower! w/ • The DR® TRIMMER/MOWER™ rolls (W W "light as a feather" on two BIG WHEELS! ¥ N Perfect So, WHY HASSLE ™ e RD f "Pound for pound the best piece with hand-held trim- ****^ of equipment we ever bought!" i — ' i i mers that are hard tO Perkasie, PA XfT»& start and tiring to use... OR with smallNOMONEY itj. . mI ft/ 'W down! I Mann To Qualified Buyers | | • DR® T RIM MER/M( )W E R 1 "This is the first and specifications of Manual, Electric-Starting and Profes-sion-MJMBmnmmm COUNTRY HOME PRODUCTS®, Dept. 2453 i Farm Bureau News

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1997

V Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Choice: Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? Best Value Now you can choose a plan which will give you the coverage you For Your Dollar: need... and will fit your budget. flHl We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. Personal Service: With over 100 local Farm Bureau offices throughout Virginia, \ \ personalized service can be as close as your own community. Jm * y o R , D |. Health Care Coverage Z^BF\ u $ road Kange Of # jf y OU are un( j er a g e 55 — f or Individuals or families « Coverage • If you are over age 65 — Medicare supplement • If you are a small business — coverage for 2-99 employees. HESE&iI You choose the health care plan that fits your needs... and your budget! iBBnl» Honey bee decline could Pla...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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