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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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The Blackberry. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

The Blackberry. Blackberries arc among tho most profitable of tho fruit crops. They au> easy of culture, not particular as to soil and exposure, hardy and always productive They need but one planting, and never grow old, as the bushes renew themselves annually. All they require is to have tho old wood taken away, and to bo occasionally supplied with dressing. Wo have said they were productive. In tho older States an acre of land "will yield from 40 to 50 per cent, more in bulk of blackberries than of corn. An average of 70 bushels per acre is nothing unusual for large plantations. Tho medicinal qualities of this berry are also highly important, and it matures at the season of the year when its peculiar properties are especially necessary to healthy digestion. It is probably the best antidote known for the common complaints of warm weather. Its roots, also possess tho medicinal properties adapted to tho indisposition peculiar to the latter part of summer. We have no statis...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Culture of Small Fruits. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Culture of Small Fruits. Many, both at the East and in this State, are becoming fearful that small fruit cultivation is being overdone. "We cannot think so. Failures occur in all pursuits, and in all branches of trade, but generally from mismanagement. Some men will succeed better than others in whatever business they may engage. The superiority of one over another is generally very easily traceable, if we study carefully the characters of the two individuals — their habits of industry and modes of doing business. Can any of our readers call to mind a failure in any branch of fruit growing, where the party kept within his means, made no serious mistakes in selecting his stock of trees or small fruits, and was industrious himself in looking after his business ? We think not. Some men will succeed better than others in growing grain, root crops, cattle or poultry —and that too when all have the same market to realize from, and equal facilities for their several productions. It is gene...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
MECHANICAL PROGRESS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

MECHANICAL PROGRESS. American Manufacture of Small Arms.—The following is from the New York Tribune oi May sth:—"The aggregate of service rifles manufactured and shipped to France by the Remington Company since the 21st of September, reaches the extraordinary total of 151,120. Adding to this 19,777 carbines and 40,850 army revolvers, the number of their own arms furnished to France by the Remingtons is '214,247, figures which seem to justify the assertion of the London Itmeß, in an article deploring the petty.organization and inadequate resources of the British small arms manufacture, that one American establishment possessed a larger capacity for production than those of all England combined. The recent adoption of the Martini-Henry breech-loader as the British Service Arm, has elicited the fact that, with her present capabilities of manufacture, England can turn out the 800,000 stand, which is accounted the proper complement for her regular army in four years. No circumstance coul...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS. Ckystals in Plants.—Dr. E. M. Hale has an article in the Journal of Microscopy upon the value of the microscope to the pharmaceutist. We extract the following: "It has been proven by microscopic examinations that saline substances are spontaneously crystallized within the cells of plants, the crystals having been found existing in infinite numbers throughout tho bark, wood and leaves of a great variety of trees and shrubs. Prof. Bailey, of West Point, first called attention to this subject. He observed tho crystals in the (she* of the hickory; afterwards he examined the bark previous to its being subjected to the action of tiro. When the bark is illuminated by the rays of the sun, numerous glittering particies are seen. An examination proves them to be cn/sials, for when thin layers of bark or sections of wood Are viewed by a microscope, the crystals arc detected'imbedded in their natural position. They are, however, better seen by scraping the bark upon a plate...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

CORRESPONDENCE.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Improved Asiatic Fowls—How to Distinguish Different Breeds. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Improved Asiatic Fowls—How to Distinguish Different Breeds. [Written for the Pkkhs.] There are so many improved fowls being presented for tho public favor, and under so many disguises, that people who do not keep fully posted in such matters, are very likely to be deceived, and perhaps imposed upon. At ono time, when the rago was all for Shanghai fowls, every long-legged, coarse-bodied, stalwart fowl was claimed as a Shanghai, or a cross with that favorite breed. But when the public began to get tired of these coarso animals, Another mammoth breed, tho Cochin China, and Chittagongs came on to dispute the claim to general favor, and then the Brahma Pootras; and now, the light Brahmas, and the dark Brahmas seem to " rulo the roost;" while the Houdans, and CreveCceurs, La Flesho, Leghorns, and the old Polanders, are all claiming a portion of the public attention. And now, every big fowl, almost, is called Brahma, or BuffCochin, or whatever seems to be the reigning favorite of the day. ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Percheron Horse Again. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

The Percheron Horse Again. Editors Pbess.—l see by your paper of May Gtb, that Mr. A. Wilsey, of Petaluma, says you were mistaken in the statement you made that my recent importation was the first Percheron stock ever brought to thia coast; as he imported a Norman colt in 1865, giving his pedigree, color, etc He says young Bawley was sired by Bollin, and imported into Champagne Co., Ohio, (docs not say where from) and was a dapple brown; Kawly Jr.'s dam, Lady Jane, was from a French Horse, Louis Napoleon. From his own statement, his horse Bawley Jr. is not more than three-quarter blood. I claim that his horse is only onequarter Percheron, and that from Louis Napoleon, as the Percheron horse is of a gray color; those that will read in this matter and who are familiar with the French author, C. DeHuy's, know this to be so. I will say that while East, looking for a Percheron horse to bring to this coast, I saw and conversed with nine different individuals who went to France expressly f...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SERICULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

SERICULTURE. We now come to perhaps the most interesting feature of the whole process of feeding silkworms, the Spinning of Cocoons. If the worms have passed all the moltings well, and begin to show ravenous appetites after they have entered upon the last age of their existence, before their transformation into moths or butterflies, the operator may safely count on soon being gladdened, if not with a golden, certainly with a silken harvest. The one socured, the other will surely follow. About four days after the worm has come out of its fourth sleep, the weather being good, it will eat faster and more than at any other period of its life; and on about the sixth day it will have attained its greatest size. From this time its appetite slacks up gradually, and it is easily perceived by an experienced eye that a change is approaching. The color changes from a rank greenish white to a mellow yellowish white. The body of the worm decreases towards the extremes and increases in the center....

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE APIARY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

THE APIARY.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Enquiries About Fruit and Bee Culture in California. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Enquiries About Fruit and Bee Culture in California. Epitohs PBBM —I have tot several years been thinking of emigrating to your Stato with the view of engaging in horticulture and bee keeping, and I beg leave to ask through your paper a few questions which T hope may be answered through the columns of the PSSSS, by those who may bo practically posted in the matters enquired of. Wlmt kind of fruit pays best, and in what locality ?- naming county, and distance from market, etc ? Will it pay to raise bees in the vicinity of fruit orchards, or does the dry season cause the dowers to dry up? What time do bees swarm ? How often can they be allowed to swarm in ono season with safety; or with profit to the owner? What is the average yield of honey each year?—■where is the honey sold, and at what price per pound—box honey and strained? What are bees worth in common box hives, and in movable comb hives? Jlotli native and Italian beet? Are there many in California, who make bees a specialty ? ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Chloroforming Bees. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Chloroforming Bees. It is unpleasant in the extreme to some people at least, when tho sweet treasures of the bee hive me to 1 c taken away, to feel obliged to resort to the nauseating practice of suffocating them with tobacco smoke, or doom them to the still worse " Itrnth of <li viU Hiinxri (I in briiiiKtone rock," especially as ltoth tobaccoand sulphur may bo dispensed with i ami more efficient and less distasteful means employed to accomplish tlio result. We refer to the employ, mcnt of chloroform, now extensively used in England, and it is said, without injurious results, tO stupefy bees so us to remove the honey. The mode of Application is us follows: A tablfl is set about ten feet from the hive, and covered with I cloth. Some chloroform (about a quarter or a sixth of an ounce) is then poured into a shallow dish and covered with a wire gauze, to prevent the bees from falling into it The hire is then removed from its stand and set over the chloroform. In about twenty ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
How to Introduce Italian Queens to Native Bees. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

How to Introduce Italian Queens to Native Bees. Tako nway tho queen of tho colony t3 which the Italian 11neon is to be given. To find her most easily, open tho hivo when many of tho been are ont gathering honey; disturb the boos as little as possible, and, if convenient, havo an assistant to examine one side of the comb while yon examine tho other. Look on the combs in the center of the cluster of bees first, as the queen is most likely to be there; as soon as yon find her remove from tho hive, and then put the Italian queen with a few workers, which are sent with her, in the wire cage, stopping the mouth of the cage with a piece of honey -comb partly filled with honey; lay the cage on the frames over the cluster of bees, or, if tho weather is cool, suspend the cage between two combs in the cluster of Bees, The bees will gnaw through the comb stopper in a few hours and liberate the queen. In four or five days after, examine all tho combs and remove all the queen cells if any aro sta...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURAL NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

AGRICULTURAL NOTES. CALIFORNIA. The Crops.—Favorable accounts continue to come in from tho northern and tho mountain and coast counties. Tho report from Butto county is to the effect that the crops are looking well, especially about (Moo. Thoro has been no frost to injure the grain and the prospects are favorable for an avorage harvest. Grain is looking remarkably well on tho Honecut—never better. In tho valleys of Plumas oounty vegetation is looking splendid, and everything promises an abundant yield. The Folaom Telegraph says the grain on the hills about, that place is looking well, and both farmers and vineyardists throughout the oountyare happy in the expectation of abundant crops. SSVBBB I'kost.h —No Fiuit i\ SiSKivor. Tin 1 Vn'kii Journal says that nearly all the fruit in Siskiyou county was killed by a severe frost in the early part of the month. No fruit has been spared, not oven apples. At a later date less severe frosts have visited some other portions of the State— Lake, ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Queries. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Queries. W. W. Powers, writes from Cajon Ranch, San Diego county:—Can you or any of your contributors tell me of any Avash that can be applied to young fruit trees to keep rabbits from gnawing them. I think I have seen mention made of some preparation of sulphur applied to them. We have set out about 2,000 young trees of various kinds. So far the rabbits have not molested them; as yet there is plenty of green grass and grain for them; but as soon as that dries we expect the rabbits will go for our trees. We have also put out several thousand grape cuttings and roots, and the rabbits have trimmed a few of them. Is there any way of poisoning them? Rabbits are very abundant here, but we are not much troubled with gophers or squirrels. We shall have about half a crop in this valley. A few pieces of grain sowed on old land will make a full crop. Will wheat or barley come up, or do well if plowed in six inches deep ? What does a common subsoil plow cost, and how much of a team does it req...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOME AND FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

HOME AND FARM.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Strawberries in California. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Strawberries in California. The first strawberries in any considerable quantity, generally make their appearance in this market about the first of April, and have usually sold from 20 to 25 cents per pound, but the price has been considerably less this season. The grand rush is about the first throe weeks in May. The rush for the present season is now about at its bight. It is expected that nearly twice the usual aggregate will bo produced this year. The average price for several years has been about 8 cents per pound. This year it will fall below 5, a figure which leaves a very handsome margin for profit to the producer. The largest shipment from Santa Clara Valley sent to this market in any one day, last year, is reported by the Santa Clara Agriculturist to havo been abomt 40.000 pounds. The amount which has arrived daily during the past week has been 00,000 to 70,000 pounds—mostly from that locality, nearly half a pound for every person in the city! Santa Clara Valley furnishes m...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Farmer's Wives. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Farmer's Wives. The reading of essays by the ladies is ono of the exercises which give life and interest to the meetingsof the Springtield (Vt.) Farmers' Club. From one of the essays by Mrs. Daniel Rice, published in tho Vermont Fanner, we cojjy the following paragraph: "Did you ever think of the amount of thought requisite to plan throe meals a day for three hundred and sixty-five days in succession? To prepare enough and not too much, and for those living at a distance from tho village, to remember that the stock of flour, BUgar, tea, etc, etc., is replenished in due time? Do you ever think of the multitude of her cares and duties? She must rise early to prepare breakfast or oversee it. Perhaps there are children to wash, dress and feed, or to get ready for school with their dinners. There is baking, sweeping, dusting, making beds, lunch for tho men, may be — dinner, supper to be made ready at the proper time—the washing, starching, folding and ironing of clothes— the oare of milk...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Some Poor Practices. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Some Poor Practices. To attempt to fatten throe hogs into 1,---200 pounds of pork on just as much feed as would keep two nicely growing. To estimate agricultural fail's as arrant humbugs, and spend three days every mouth saving the country at political meetings. To depend Upon borrowing your neighbors' rakes, mowers, und all sorts of implements in haying and harvest time. To house up a thousand bushels of grain waiting for a rise, till one-tenth has gone to feed rats and mice, and the remainder smells like the essence of rat, and the price is down forty per cent. To plant out a big orchard of fruit trees with a first thought of money-making, and leave them to do or die. To keep two fancy five hundred dollar carriage horses, and pay six dollars a day for a team to plough. It is positively a poor practice to call "book learn in'" all bosh .to ignore news and agricultural papers, and attempt to keep an eren yoke with your progressive neighbors b/ main strength and stupidness.—"''ikmo."...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Why do Animals Need Salt? [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Why do Animals Need Salt? Prof. James ]']. Johnston, of Scotland, says : " Upwards of half tho saline matter of blood (fifty-seven percent.) consists of common salt, and this is partly discharged every day through the nkin and kidneys; the necessity of continued supplies of it to the healthy body becomes sufficiently obvious. The bile also contains .soda (one of the ingredients of salt) as a special and indispensable constituent, and so do all the cartilages of the body. Stint the supply of salt, therefore, and neither will tho bile be able properly to assist digestion nor the cartilage to be built up again M last as they naturally waste. It is better to place salt whan stock can have free access to it, than to give it occasionally in Urge quantities. They will help themselves to what they need, if allowed to do so, at pleasure; otherwise when they become "suit-hun-gry" they may take more than is wholesome.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Brine Poisonous to Animals. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 27 May 1871

Brine Poisonous to Animals. Several years ago, M. Eeynal, an eminent French veterinarian, urged that brine in which pork and other meats had been pickled, was a deadly poison to horses and hogs, in proof of this, the Kentucky Turf Register suvs : " We were last week a personal witness to its practical demonstration. A gentleman in the village of Lawrenoeport, Ind., emptied brine from a pork barrel into his lot. A drove of hogs, as also one horse, partook of it, and tho result was, the horse and seven hogs out of the nine, died in less than six hours from the time the barrel was emptied.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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