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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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District Mining. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

At a board meeting of the Linton Gold and Minerals Coy., held on Mon day, it was reported that the dam had been completed, and preparations had been made for sinking the shaft another 50 feet. Mr H. Newman Reed, C.E., consulting engiueer to the company, re I ported that he had inspected 18 to 20 | batteries and plants, most of which were unsuitable. The selection of a winding plant, gas engine and battery was left in Mr Reid's hands to negotiate.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE Grenville Standard, PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. Printed and published by LIONEL SPARROW, sole Proprietor, at the office of the "Grenville Standard" newspaper, Clyde street, Linton, in the State of Victoria. Registered at the General Post Office, Melbourne, for transmission as a newspaper. SATURDAY, NOV. 6, 1915. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. Printed and published by Lionel Spaiiuovt, sole Proprietor, at the office ojf the "Greuville Standard" newspaper, Olyde street, Linton, in the State of Viotoria. Registered at the Geaeral Post Office, Melbourne, for transmission as a newspaper. SATURDAY, NOV. 6, 1915. The many friends of Miss Kennedy, of Linton, will be grieved to learn that she is in a very low condition. The young lady is at Geelong, where she is receiving every attention that medical and nursing skill can afford, but very little hope is held out for her recovery, Victor George Anderson, son of Mr E. Anderson, of Bealiba, and formerly of Carngharo, who died on active service, met his death in connection with an accident to a troopship, in which he was severely injured. He was one of seven who were saved at the Island of Lemnos. He wa$ operated on, but the shock proved too much for him. A special appeal is being made to Presbyterians of Victoria during the , current month to wipe out the d...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

Australia IIK AD OFFICE T°?an«» General Banking Business p&Jufai CITIES and TOWN8 of AU3TRALIA, and LONDON Cable remittances made, to, and drafts drawn on foreign places direct.' Foreign bills : • negotiated ami collected. Letters of credit issuer! to any part of the world. Banking and Kxchange Huniness of every description transacted within the Commonwealth, United Kingdom and abroad. Current accounts opened. Interest paid on fixed deposits. Advances made against approved securities. Savings Bank Department BRANCHES in the chief centres and AGENCIES at over Post offices • • Interest at no/ 1 /. %BBO in Australia porannum o/c •"/ Deposit and Papua up to £300 INTERSTATE and INTERNATIONAL Savings Bank Facilities . JAMES. K EL!.. H»pn:.r O.jrrmor, Jnnr, fflS DBS IS -V MILLKK. Qunriwr

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MUSICAL PARROTS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

MUSICAL PARROTS. That parrots are tlie greatest char acter students in the bird and ani mal kingdom is the contention of ex perts who have closely studied their capabilities. A parrot, it is said, has as large a brain as a man's in pro portion to his size, and he uses it well. Despite ' his actions and ap pearances to the contrary, the par rot is exceedingly sensitive. It is this trait which has given rise to his bad reputation for the three s's—sul lenness, stupidity and stubbornness. Someone orders a parrot to do something. The parrot looks at him 1 and thinks it over. It is character istic of the wise person that he I thinks before he speaks. It is char acteristic also of the wisest bird, the parrot. The parrot reads a man or woman by voice. That accounts for the fancies taken by parrots to certain human beings. They read unerring ly character as revealed by the voice. ; Next to the voice, they are sensitive as to c lors. They also have a great I ear for,, music. In one case a pa...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SMYTHESDALE. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

8MYTHE8DALE. The annual meeting of the Athletic Club was held ou Tuesday evening of last week ; Mr M. M'Meuamin presiding. The secretary read the balance-sheet of the sports meeting held on Boxing Day, 1914. The receipts were £193 5s 7d, and expenditure, including a donation of £10 to Lady Stanley's appeal, was £154 9s 6d, leaving a credit balance of £39 0s l Id. It was resolved to hold a' sports meeting on Boxing Day, 1915, and part proceeds to be donated to the Australian sick and wounded soldiers and the Bal larat Hospital. The election of officers resulted as follows :—President, Cr M. M'Menamin ; vicerpresidents, Gr Har- : ridge and Creed ; secretary, Mr W: T. Williamson; judges, Messrs W. T. Williamson, C. Harridge, J. Chatham, M.L.A., C. Pender, and Mr Boyce ; handicappers, Messrs M. M'Menamin, L. Reitze, J. Creed, C. Pender, and H. Japp. A sub-committee was formed to draw up a programme to submit at next meeting held. The secretary was in structed to call for tenders for all...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DARING FEATS FOR THE "MOVIES." [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

DARING FEATS FOR THE "MOVIES." Managing a certain film company in America is a man who has risk ed his life t least fifty times in order that sensational pictures might be obtained. Known as the dare-devil of the movies, Louis G. McPhee started by jumping from High Bridge, New York City, into the waters of Harlem River. The bridge stands 138ft. high, and McPhee con fesses that it was the narrowest squeak he had ever had, for he'-was unconscious before he struck the water. The shock, however, restored him, and he managed to struggle to the shore, when he discovered that he had broken three of his ribs and fractured his jaw. But he had the satisfaction of knowing that he had provided one of the most sensational movies of the day. For this daring feat McPhee re ceived £100, but its principal value to him was the reputation it - gave him as a death-defier. Engagements for similar feats followed thick and fast, and there was nothing too dan gerous for him to attempt. He jumped from an ae...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HAPPY VALLEY. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

HAPPY VALLEY. It has been decided to hold the . an nual reunion of the Old Scholars' As sociation on Boxing .Day, 27th Decem ber next. The piano presented to the school by the old scholars is proving a very useful addition to the equipment,' and is much appreciated by the scholars. The losses of stock in this district dur ing " the little drought " through which we have just passed has been very severe, but it is hoped with a succession of good seasons to soon replace the losses. : Ptes. Harold Martinez and Norman Reid, driver of Red Cross ambulance, and J. J. Milburn were home on final .leave last week. Pte. H. Martinez and Norman Reid were presented, with .a fountain pen each by their friends, and Pte. J. J. Milburn a silver-mounted pipe. The residents wished them good luck and a safe return.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Methodist Anniversary. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

The anniversary of the Carngham Methodist Church aind Sunday school was celebrated, on Sunday by special ser vices in the afternoon and evening, and by a tea-meeting and entertainment on Monday evening. Both services were well attended. The Rev. A. E. Brack well occupied the, pulpit in ibe absence of the Rev. Harris, Methodist chaplain, who was miabie to attend- on accoiurt of. the special .services at the camp. Mr Brackwell gave eloquent sermons. The tea meeting was held in th? Me chanics' Hall, and was very successful and enjoyable. The management of-the tables was skilfully carried out by ^the following ladies —Mrs J. A. Dawson, Mrs Alf. Chibnail, Mrs Thos. Brumby, jun , Mrs Knight, Mrs I. Williams, Mrs Tweedale, Mrs J. W.' Steven3, Mrs Quillam, Mrs A. Brumby, Misses Camp, B. Dawson, and R. Brumby. The concert was also s great success. The Rev. R. L. Reed presided, and gave a short address. The following recita tions were then given " I am the (bhief," Master W. Brumby ; " The Bo...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"I AM THE BAYONET." MY STORY. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

"I AM THE BAYONET." j MY STORY. By William Booth. I was born in or about Bayonne, in Southern France, in the year 1671; therefore they christened me "the bayonet." I had elder brothers born in Flanders, but they were not true bayonets. Still, they did their share in the world's work, as I did mine. The musketeers around Ypres, I am told, used to stick the round handles of their daggers in the muzzles of their muskets, but they were not true bayonets. ~"~" When I was first born I was a plug bayonet, with a shaft that fitted snug ly into the muzzle of a gun, as my brpthers of Ypres did, but I was made specially for the purpose and they were but makeshifts. It was not very long, however, be fore my masters improved both me and my method of attachment to my friend the firearm. Sometimes, in my place in the muzzle of the gun, I was in the way. Obviously the gun could n&t be fired while I was in position. The Englishmen lost Killiecrankie for this reason,- and so in time socket ba...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BRAVE BOYS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

BRAVE BOYS. Our wounded continue to give splendid evidence of fortitude. One man, wounded in the chest, came along, writes a soldier from France. As lie passed us a bullet hit him in the leg. He stopped and had it tied up. But wait for a stretcher? Not he! Off he hobbled again to the dressing station. "Plenty of worse cases for stretchers," said he. Another man sat down by us, had a sip of water, and tried to get out a cigarette. That was not easy, as he was wounded. He was greatly obliged when we handed him a "fag" and lit it for him, and he apologised for any trouble he had caused us. Trouble! My word, he was in pain —white to the lips, but not a groan escaped him. He just talked about the fight—that was all.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ITALY'S NAVY. Where Dreadnoughts Were First Seen. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

ITALY'S NAVY. Where Dreadnoughts Were First Seen. It is a fact of which few people are ■" aware that thirty years ago Italy's yards were turning out battleships 2000 tons larger than anything in the British fleet, and arming them with the heaviest guns ever put on a man of-war. Moreover, Italy has the dis tinction of producing the man in whose mind the Dreadnought Type was first evolved—the late Signor Cuniberti—who actually sketched a design which was a good forecast of the Queen Elizabeth. Italy's first Dreadnought, the Dante Alighieri,, was laid down in the sum mer of 1909, and completed in three years. She was the first warship in the world to have her guns mounted on the triple turret system. Following the Dante, five larger and more powerful ships were laid down. These vessels are all good for a speed of 23 knots, though their armor is comparatively light, having a maximum thickness of 9% inches amidships. ;Their broadside fire is 11,0501b. of metal as compared with the Iron D...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HIS LIFE FOR A FRIEND. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

1 HIS LIFE FOR A FRIEND. I Under a Paris date the "Daily Ex press" publishes the following:— "There lies a gallant English gen tleman," said the Bavarian officer. Lying in the British hospital at Versailles is a young city man, a clerk from a stockbroker's office, who joined a Territorial battalion of the Bedfordshire Regiment shortly after the outbreak of the war. Sit ting by his bedside I heard his poignant story, told in simple lan guage; a tale of a man who gave his life so that his friend might have a chance of returning to his wife and child. A friendship that began at school was continued to manhood. Two young men entered the same office, and sat oh adjoining stools. One, my informant, married last July. "You can talk about shirkers," he said; "we were both shirkers then. Why should we risk our lives, I ask ed my pal one morning as we came up from Surbiton together. Then came Belgium and the atrocities. We began to realise things more. My pal said he' was going to enlist, and...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TOD SLOAN'S STORIES. HOW THE CROUCH ORIGINATED. Scheme to Beat the Favorite. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

TOD SLOAN'S STORIES. | HOW THE CROUCH ORIGINATED. Scheme to Beat the Favorite. "I may as well be frank about it. The truth is that I was so bad until 1893, that I was a by-word among! trainers. They used to say that if a man didn't want his horse to win he ! needn't have him -pulled. All that he had to do was to send for Sloan. His riding would be handicap enough." This is the frank confession of Tod Sloan, originator of the nlonkey-on-the stick crouch in the saddle. Fifteen ' years ago, when he had achieved j world-wide fame, he backed his mount in the Czarewitch to win £66,000, and j a big punter laid him a small fortune to nothing against himself. The truth leaked out, the stewards of the Jockey Club sent him down. They have held him down ever since, and apparently in despair of regaining a license, or in the hope that candid confession may win a reprieve, he has, written the reminiscences of a life chequered by the most remarkable varieties and vicissitudes of fortune. Tod Sloan...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE OPINIONS OF "CHEERFUL JOF" On Money in War-Time. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

THE OPINIONS OF "CHEERFUL JOP" On Money in War-Time. By Bertram Atkey. "We have been argufying about the state o' money in these here "war -times, Cheerful Joe," said Mr. Barl, as Joe entered the bar-parlor of the Hog in the Pound for his usual even ing interview with his friends and his tankard. "What's your opinions about it?" "My opinions is that money's a very pleasant thing to argufy about when a man's got any of it—but it's dull work talkin' about it when he ain't got none," said Cheerful Joe. "What I finds is that if so be as I do happen to have a shillin' or two in me britches pocket I can always take a interest in follerin' up what our Mr. Lloyd George tells us about these here hundreds and thousands o' mil lions o' money we got to spend afore we wipes out these here German var mints. I've noticed it often, and a very pecoolier thing 'tis, accordin' to my mind. Why, t'other day when I sold a few pullets a lot better thaa. what I expected I should, and had a extry'shillin' o...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HUMOROUS INCIDENTS. Cool Request. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

j HUMOROUS INCIDENTS. | I , Cool Request. 1 "Would you be kind enough to re turn my photograph?" she wrote. "I gave it to you in a moment of girlish folly, and 1 have since had occasion to regret that I was so thoughtless in such matters." Of course she pictured that photo graph framed and hung up in his J room, and was inclined to think that he would part from it with deep re gret. Just why she wanted it return ed is immaterial. Of course, he had offended her in some way, and she wished to test his love, but it is un- . necessary to inquire how. "j The answer to her note came the following day. j "I regret," it read, "that I amNin- . ; able at this late date to pick out your photograph. However, I send j you my entire collection, numbering : a little over 500, and would request ' that you return all except your own by passenger train at my expense." I i ■ !

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE MAXIMS OF JAPHET. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

THE MAXIMS OF JAPHET. By Gelett Burgess. . My son, when thou sittest at meat with a damsel, have a care how thou eatest, lest thou offend her. For this is the test of love: what soever goeth into thy mouth and co'm eth out again, the same shall try her , as with fire. 1 And of these things shalt tiiou have a care: of the apple, and the orange, 1 and the peach, and fruits with skins i after their kind. I The cherry and the plum and the ■■ olive and the apricot, and fruits with . stones after their kind. | The grape and the raspberry and , .the water-melon, and fruits with seeds after their kind, of all these ' things shalt thou have a care. I ■ And whatsoever hath seeds or , skins or stones, that thou spewest ' •out of thy mouth, these shall be an abomination unto her, unless she , love thee. | Thou shalt not help her on with . her wrap whilst thou hast a cigar in ] thy teeth; it is abomination. Neither shalt thou pick thy teeth behind they napkin; it is abomina tion of abominations....

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHY DOGS WAG THEIR TAILS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

WHY DOGS WAG THEIR TAILS. Because tliey are pleased, of course! Quite so, but why should a dog wag its tail as a sign of delight? It appears, according to canine ex perts, tliat just as the tension of the muscles of the face makes us smile or grin when pleased, so in our friend the dog the wagging tail follows the same rule. A similar response of the body to emotion is seen when we are embar rassed. Most people are familiar with the twisting and wriggling of the body shown by a shy country fellow w'ho has suddenly been taken into a room with a number of city girls. : As they say in books, "he wriggles with embarrassment." The emotion has made all his muscles so tense that he cannot stay still. His wriggling about in his chair, his twisting of his hands, serve as a sort of safety valve to relieve the strain on his feelings caused by his shyness m the presence of strangers. Savages and people of small re straint and strong emotions show their pleasure by bodily actions. Thus we read o...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IF ANIMALS COULD SPEAK. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

IF ANIMALS COULD SPEAK. It is a startling fact that if some animals could tell their life history they would be able to recall events whica happened hundreds of years ago. A Russian eagle, for instance, would be able to remember watching with greedy eyes as one by one the French soldiers under Napoleon fell exhausted out of the ranks in their awful retreat from Moscow in 1812. There are crocodiles alive in India to day that saw the first English travel ler set foot there, while there are whales in the sea which may have skirted the coast of France when Eng land invaded it in 1415. A great many elephants could recall historical events of a hundred years ago, while there are ravens still living whose memory could go back twice that period. Talking of birds, the parrot, the crow, and the swan often live a hun dred ?ears—that is, of course, if they do not meet with misfortune—while the heron will live sixty years. Geese an I pelicans will survive half a cen tury and the sparrow forty ye...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AGRICULTURE. PRODUCTIVE CAPACITY OF SOILS [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

AGRICULTURE. PRODUCTIVE CAPACITY OF SOILS The productive capacity of soils is not indicated by their ability to pro duce crops for one year or for five years. A soil may be very low in productive capacity, and yet produce good crops for a few years. In working with reclaimed swamp soils, it has been found that good crops were obtained, for a number of years, but that afterwards the yields rapidly declined. Thus, on one farm the reclaimed swamp lands produced about forty bushels of wheat per acre for the first few years, and afterwards declined, so that in ten years the average yields were only five to ten bushels to the acre. An investigation of this particular farm showed that the field lacked pot ash, and the re-application of this ele ment brought up the yields of wheat to about forty bushels to the acre. The point that should be noted is the one concerning the small amount of this element in that field at the begin ning. It had in it at first enough of the element mentioned to p...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Quite Harmless. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 November 1915

Quite Harmless. I A Londoner, just arrived at a Scot tish. town, and on Ms way to a hotel, I addressed the porter who led the way:— "Not a large place this?" ; :No "verra," was the answer. "Has it a corporation?" "A what, sir?" inquired the bag gage-bearer. "I mean, who rules it?" - j "Rules it? Juist the Provost." j "Ah, the Provost. Just like our Lord Mayor. Has he got any insig nia?" remarked the Cockney. | I "Insignia! What d'ye mean?" | I quoth the puzzled Scotsman. i I "Yes, insignia; that is' to say, has ' he a chain?" the polite visitor hinted, j Whereupon the almost dumbfound ed man gasped out: i "A chain, sir! The Provost chain ed! Na, na! He gangs loose; but dinna he feared; he's quite harm- ' ; less."- j

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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