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Title: Dunmunkle Standard Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,667 items from Dunmunkle Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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PEN PICTURES OF THE PAST. JONATHAN WILD. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

PEN PICTURES OF THE PAST. • * JONATHAN WILD. ^ One of the most notorious crimi ■■iV.'nals. that ever lived, in England j was Jonathan Wild. He was born at Wolverhampton of decent parents and served an apprenticeship to a •^Birmingham buckle-maker. In 1706 being then twenty-four years of age, he deserted his wife and.infant child . and went to London, where, during a four years' imprisonment for debt, he consorted with criminals, and be fore 1 ong became the head of a gang of thieves and burglars who were known to be concerned in many crimes ; but so skilful was the chief of the gnng that it seem ed impossible to prosecute him. At last, however, two of the gang quarrelled, and one gave information at out the other, who was according ly arrested. But while being con veyed to Newgate, Wild appeared with some .followers and caused a . riot, during which the prisoner es caped. The opportunity having now come, a warrant was issued for his arrest ; but Wild disappear ed,^ for a time, and r...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FEDERAL ELECTIONS. VICTORY FOR LABOR. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

FEDERAL ELECTIONS. VICTORY FOR LABOR. The elections on Saturday did not cause much excitement, the war ab sorbing most of the public attention. The Liberal Government has been de feated, and Mr. Fisher will be called upon to form a Ministry. Ia the Wimmera the Liberal vote polled two to one against Labor, but thoy were overwhelmed by the large centres. The new House of Representatives will be constituted as follows :— Labor ... ... ... Liberal ... ... ... 33 Independent ... ... 1 The Senate has increased its Labor strength irom 29 to 32, leaving only 3 Liberals. The following are the latest results of Victorian constituencies, the small capitals indicatingjLiberals Bnlaclava—Curtin, J. J. A. 11,922 Watt, W. A. 16,334 Ballurat—Coldham, P. ft. 15,538 M'Grnth, D. C. 16,020 Batman—Frank Brennun (unopposed) Bendigo—Arthur, J. A. 15,159 Robb, A. F. M. 12,250 Bourke—Anatey, F. 21,329 Jennings, R. M. 10,876 Corangamite—Burke, T. M. 13, Manifold^J. G. 15, Corio—Kendei.l, W. 14,595 Oznnne, A....

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Care of Paint Brushes. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

Care of Paint Brushes. Common wood clothespins may be used as supports for holding paint brushes in a liquid while they are not in use. The pins are clamped on the brush handles and then placed on two sticks across the top of the pot as shown in Fig. 1. I This method of supporting them in the liquid is especially good for camel's hair or any other brush made of fine hair. Tha brushes will become very much deformed if they are' allowed to rest on the bottom, of the not. Saveral brushes can bo put in one pot, as shown in Fig. 2.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

GULBI N'S MURTOA. Ottr New Show Room will be Opened Next Week, WHEN | A Pine Display will be made of NEW SEASON'S GOODS. All are cordially invited to. pay a visit and inspect. IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. CHRIS. GULBIN, Federal Stores, M'Donald Street, Hastea®

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LATEST NEWS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

LATEST NEWS. Allies are still sweeping forward. No Russians are in France. Austrian Emperor's death reported. Vienna is in state of famine. Austria evacuated Russian Poland. Believed in Petrograd that Anstria will soon sue for peace 70,000 Indian troops in England. Press Bureau forbids mention of the movement of colonial troops. Germans retired across Grande Morin, and allies now pursuing 80 miles from Paris. Big battle proceeding by allies cen tre at Grande Coronne, and desperate fighting proceeding from Belgium to Swiss frontier. Gallant work by French and Eng lish. ' Rumored German army evacuating A Jsace. Torrential rains have checked Japan.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Gems that Change Colour. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

Gems that Change Colour. — 6 The newest fashionable gem is one that has the somewhat startling peculiarity of being a quite dif ferent colour in the evening from its daytime hue. ]n dnylight it is a brilliant golden yellow. At night, under artificial light, it is a bright emerald green. Its name is the heliodore, and it is n brand-new discovery, the first specimen of ijt having only been found quite recently. It comes from German South-West Africa, and the boom of it gomes from Berlin, where the Kaiser has made it a fad in Court circles. The Kaiser al ways wears the first-known specimen in a ring. All Hatton-garden is keenly interested in the new gem. The only other quick-change gem is the alexandrite, • so rare a stone that a good specimen runs dearer than diamonds. ■ An alexandrite is a glowing raspberry red. 'It is ; found in Russia, and got its name | from the fact that the first speci | men turned up the day the Czar I reached his twenty-first birthday, j There was a boom in th...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Deadly Industry Made Perfectly Safe. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

A Deadly Industry Made Perfectly Safe. ;—1 It seems extraordinary .that pri- | initive methods of obtaining t.he| necessary combustion iror getting 1 fire or light should have prevailed : down to the beginnings of the last J century. Yet such was the case. It was not until the thirties of the ■ nineteenth century' that a young j Austrian mechanic, Johann Jriny, j I invented tlie lucii'or match. It is true that sulphur matches had been I in use for some little time before this, but these were very crude affairs, and as such very unreliable. Jriny came along and added a little phosphorus to the sulphur that tipped, the small slips of wood and there sprang into ~existence the lucifer match. Truly one of the great events of civilisation ! This kind of match held Its own for many a long day, but it had some very detrimental properties besides the extremely useful one of a Are producer, and so it had to go in the end. ' It is well known , that , phosphorus is remarkably combustible. A lig...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Dominie to the Japs. MR. A. LOTON RIDGER, F.R.C.S., GIVES HIS EXPERIENCES. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

A Dominie to the Japs. MR. A. LOTON RIDGER, F.R.C.S., GIVES HIS EXPERIENCES. I' "What is that big building over | there ?" I asked my companion, as | ivc walked down the Ginza in To [ kio. "No !" ho replied, with a sagacious nod. "What—is—that—big —building— over—there ?" I repeat ed, with painstaking simplicity. "Indeed !" was the answer. With patience only born from long ex perience, I repeated my question for the third time. "So ?" this time was the response. I thereupon gavo it up. And this pupil was one in a uni versity class to which I was en gaged in teaching ICnglish, and was compelled by the curriculum to teach from do Quincey's "Lectures of War." Was it to be wondered at that I surreptitiously substituted something lighter ? Incidentally, I nearly got the sack for my pains ! Japan is oducation mad—and, worse still, system mad. All the teachers—or "professors," as we are called—tench on some system. I horrified the prosident of one institution by replying to his query as to...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A SHRINKING SEA. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

• A SHRINKING SEA. The surfacc of the Caspian, which lies 88ft. below sea level, has, since June, 1910, been continually sink ing, without a plausible explana tion having hitherto been found. No great importance was at first attached to, the phenomenon, but the shrinkage went on, and is now even beginning to be inconvenient for navigation, a"? steamers in many places cannot reach the landing stages. It is believed that the river water flowing into the sea is not- suffi cient to make good the loss caused by evaporation. The State Militia, acting upon the orders of the Governor to stop gambling on the Tulsa Racecourse, recently fired a volley over the heads of the riders as they came down the straight. None of the riders were injured, but the race was bro ken up. The adjutant-general said that if another race was run he would order the soldiers to shoot down the horses.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Mouse Escaped. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

The Mouse Escaped. ll The landlady, while cngnged in her domestic duties, encountered a mouse in the flour-barrel. Now, most ladies in similar cir cumstances would have vittered a few genuine shrieks, and then sought .safety in the garret ; but this one possessed more than tho ordinary degree of courage. She called the lodger and told him to get the gun, call the dog, and stand at a con venient distance. Then she clam bered half-way upstairs, and com menced to punch tho flour barrel with a pole. Presently the mouse made its ap pearance and started across the floor. The dog at once went in pur suit. The man fired and the dog dropped dead ; the lady fainted and fell downstairs, and the man, think ing she was killed, disappeared. The mouse escaped.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Large Ice Cave. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

The Large Ice Cave. —:— • A few years ago some members of the Austrian .Speleological . So ciety discovered- in the Daclistein mountains some caverns, which are among the largest in Europe. One, of these grottoes, the longitudinal axis of which is fully 6,500ft. long, [ moreover, turned out to offer ad- i ditional interest by its truly onor- j mous ice masses, and was found to be the largest known ice cave in j the world. | Though a scorching sun may be burning outside on the bare moun tain rock, there, is alwaj's an icy wind blowing" . through this under world, freezing everything within its reach. The Daehstein ico cavo comprises several domes filled with ice, which communicate with one another through a number of frozen gal leries. Gigantic Ice pillars tower on both edges of this chasm, in the depth of which there unfolds fairylike ice scenery. Wtenf,outth,inton,nSfl mfc C£&e™ ("Tristan Dome," as it is called), where a plain ico sheet reaches from or.e wall to the other, ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(ALL.RIGHTS RESERVED.) THE MESHES OF FATE. OR, THE CURSE OF THE BLUE DIAMONDS. PART 13. CHAPTER XXIV—(Continued.) [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

(ALL .RIGHTS RESERVED.) meshTs'otfate. » —— O R, THE CURSE OF THE BLUE DIAMONDS. By Hedley Richards, Author of "Th« Mine Master's Heir," "Time, the ! Avenger," etc., etc. j PART 13. CHAPTER XXIV—(Continued.) Meanwhile, Therese made a hasty, breakfast, which she forced herself to take, then she went upstairs, and put on a serviceable blue serge dress, a hat and veil ; next she unlocked ' her grandmother's desk, and took from it notes to the value of a hun dred and fifty pounds, and twenty pounds in gold, besides some silver. The gold and silver she put in her purse, the notes in a small leather bag, in which she also put a few things that she would require, and ,g°iag ^ownstel^ Bhe^p^fd^t a<jf .r—regardless of the hammer ing on the kitch:n door. She had taken a large padlock with her, and when she had passed into the lane, she locked the gate securely, taking the key and that of the hall door with her. Then she hastened to the station, which she reached in time to take a t...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
In the Wild West. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

In the Wild West. 1 In tho days when the West was really "wild" and "woolly," good doctors were scarcer than women out in the mining camps. I Sometimes a^-man who had failed at prospecting would set up an "office" in a - shack and become a "lawyer," or "dentist," or " doc tor." There is a young physician in Chicago whose, father, was one of the few* competent physicians in a wide stretch of . couutry ; it was not unusual for him to ride fifty or a hundred miles to visit a pa tient. He once got the following extraordinary letter from one of the mining failures who had set up as a "doctor" :— "Dear Dock I have a pashunt whose trubbles I dirgnose as havin' his windpipe ulseratcd • oft and his lungs dropped down in his stuni 1 mik. I have given hym evvcrything ' you could think of but with no ef*,. ' feck his father is a rich and welllhy man with busels of monney ana i i \ don't want fo'loss hym ho is too good a pasimnt what shal I do for I livm Dices ans a reol.v by return male at once...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FARM. HARVESTING LUCERNE FOR HAY. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

THE FARM. —4 HARVESTING LUCERNE FOR HAY, "Forage crops suffer both in yield and quality i! harvested too early or too late. Much damage is done, also, when too much or too little time is given lor curing. Lucerne is especially susceptible to mistreat ment because the leaves may be lost, the colour spoiled and soluble nutri ents lost by a little neglect, and it pays good returns for care owing to the high price of a first-class pro duct. First class lucerne hay has fine stems, many leaves, and a bright, pea;green colour," says R. L. Stew art; of th& New Mexico College of Agriculture. "If lucerne has made a rank growth it will be found necessary to harvest at an earlier period than if it has grown slowly. Rank growth means coarse hay. This is why the second cutting of hay is usually coarser and not so good in quality as the first cutting. If the lucerne is allow ed to stand too long before cutting, the lower leaves will turn yellow and fall, and the part that the hay buy er mo...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Chickens Hatched by Bees [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

Chickens Hatched by Bees i Rearing chicks by electricity seems a tall order, yet this is what is being done at a chick farm at Muskogee, Oklahoma, where the welfare of the occupant from j the eg.g is electrified and the growth of the young birds forced by the aid of electric light. A tungsten lamp is about sixty watts is hung in the runway, . nnd is switched on I and off alternately for eight hours! each. When the light is on the j chick fills its crop, and rests after the light is turned off. The ca pacity of the incubator is for eigh teen to twentj' trays, ono under the other ; thus upwards of 5,000 eggs fill a single chamber. The trays are so arranged that a blast tf warm air circulates through the rows ot eggs. Some: of the farms installed by the apparatus can hatch 10,000 chicks evory day in'the'year, and in a sin gle season as many as 20,000,000 lively chicks have been hatched and shipped abroad. hive and knows something about poultry knows that chickens can be hatched" satisf...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MURTOA WOMEN'S PATRIOTIC LEAGUE. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

MURTOA WOMEN'S PATRIOTIC LEAGUE. At a meeting of the above, held on Friday, September 4th, the president reported that a second parcel had been forwarded to the Lady Mayoress, con sisting of 96 towels, 35 cotton shirts, 12 flannel undershirts, 11 pairs sox, 26 handkerchiefs, and 60 washers; also that ^30 4s 6d had been received in cash, of which ^"15 10s ad had been spent in materials, leaving a balance of ^,14 14s 4d in the bank. Special mention was made of the work done by the school children of Lubeck and Murtoa. At the close of the meeting another parcel (the third) was packed. It con tained 1 cotton shirt, 3 sleeping suits, and 2 pairs of knitted sox, making a total of 366 articles sent by Murtoa women. Since the meeting a further donation of 2 pairs knitted sox, 2 cotton shirts, and 3 flannel shirts has been received by the secretary and forwarded to Mel bourne. The next meeting will be held on Friday, nth. The secretary wishes to acknowledge the following additional contribu ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XXV. WELCOME HOME. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

CHAPTER XXV. WELCOME HOME. An exclamation of surprise escaped Mr. Short, then ho said : "DM Miss Therese fasten you in the kitchen becauso she could not get that paper ?" "Yes, sir. It wasn't more than eight o'clock, and there ws've been the livelong day." "Will you let me take the paper to the inspector ?" he asked. "No, sir. I promised the mistress I'd follow the directions, and they say I'm to take it, and take It I shall," she said, decidedly. "Very well, then, I'll go with y,ou. I supp'ose you'll take charge of the house until she returns ?" he said, looking at Eliza. "Not if I know it. Do you think. I am going to be left alono with a corpse, and a corpse that hasn't died a natural death ?" replied Eliza. "You just come along-, with me," snid Phoebe. In a few mfnutes the two were ready to start, and, assistod by Mr. Short, they got through the break fast room window, which they shut after them. At the gate the two servants look ed aghast. ''Well, I never! Whatever made her fast...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TEFF GRASS. TO THE EDITOR. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

TEFF GRASS. TO THE EDITOR. Sir,—This plant is a native of Abys sina and is largely cultivated in the hill country jhere. ii was introduced into S. Africa some years ago, where it has proved of immense value for fodder; and it is a splendid variety for a summer hay crop It has been cut for hay in seven weeks from the time it was sown. When it is high enough to shade the ground, its growth is simply phenomenal, and as many as two or three cuttings may be made from it in a short season. Its feeding value is very high, and it is eaten greedily by all classes of stock One farmer declares that his cattle will leave green lucerne for it, while a promi nent dairyman avers that his milk sup ply was greatly increased by feeding Teff. It is an annual, and should be sown in spring. It will thrive on any ground wet or dry, but soil of porous, sandy nature is most suitable, and pro duces from two to three tons of dry hay per acre. It will grow luxuriantly where lucerne will not live, and being so...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CORRESPONDENCE. We do not identify ourselves with the opinions expressed by correspondents in this column, nor will we in any way hold ourselves responsible for same.] EXPLANATION. TO THE EDITOR. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

CORRESPONDENCE. We do not identify ourselves with the opinions expressed by correspondents in this column, nor will we in any way hold ourselves responsible for same.] EXPLANATION. TO THE EDITOR. Sir,—When perusing your interesting journal to-day I was surprised to notice that you refer to me as having been ap pointed " Regimental Clerk in the Quarter-Master's Office." The position which I at present hold is " Squadron Quarter-Master Sergeant " and as such (together with the Squadron Sergeant Maior) occupy the Squadron "Office Tent." -Yours, etc., R. JACK, S.Q.M.S. Broadraeadows, Sept. 5th, 1914.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A LIFE OF TRAGEDIES. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 18 September 1914

A LIFE OF TRAGEDIES. Cecily, Duchess of York, who died on May 31, 1485, probably had I more appalling tragedies connected ^ with her life than anyone has ever had. Daughter of Ralph Neville, the powerful Earl of Westmorland, she was the youngest of twenty-one children, and married Richard rian tagenet, Duke of York. Her family made strenuous efforts to see her and her husband on the throne of j England; but they were all swept away in different tragic ways be fore Cicely became the mother of kings. | Her nephew', Humphrey, was killed | at St. Albans in 145;">, and her I brothi'r-in-law, the Duke of Ducking ham, met the same fate at North hampton in 1460. Iier husband was killed at the Battle of Wakefield! just as the crown was within his grasp. Two more of her nephews were killed at the same time and | place. Her brother, the Earl of Salisbury, was captured and put to: death. Her young, twelve-year-old son, j Edmund, Earl of Rutland, was caught flying from the fatal field with hi...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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