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Title: Illinois Farmer Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,057 items from Illinois Farmer, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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UNKNOWN [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

M > U piittoisi gmmt , PUBLISHED MONTHLY , j BATLHAC ME c . BAKER . JOURNAL OFFICE . SrRIKQFIELD , I 1 L S . FRANCIS . Editor . m . TERMS OP SUBSCRIPTION . One cop ; , one year , in advance . ——— $ 1 00 Five copies , • -.- — . 3 76 Ten sod oneto the person getting upclu . b T 5 o fifteen copies and over . 62 J £ cents each , undone to person getting up club . CASH BATES op AsviRTistKa : One dollar per sqasro often lines , each insertion .

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
CONTENTS . V [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

CONTENTS . V Agriculture , as connected with Scliools , Colleges , and Pub . lie Institutions 353 Health and what promotes it ....- - ... — ......-366 The Cunt ; fair . „ . 357 Orchards — ... ——— . —— . — 357 The Aut . intn—— —— — . — . — . _ - -. 353 :. Fa ! l Plowing ........ — ... —— .- — ... —„; . — . „ . ——357 Winter Schooling ............... — - . — . 357 Seed Corn . — - ——358 The American Chestnut—1— — ... . — .. — ..-. 358 The Hog ,. — — ...- — — . — . —359 Washington Cojuty Fair ... . . . — .. 35 B Eonthern llliauie—— . — . — . ——— . 359 Agricultural Periodicals for Pren-iums— —359 Fall Business — , — ... —360 Fall Work —— . 360 Qspes——— . — ... — .. —— . — .., .. —360 Dull Times . — . — -. —— , — . —360 Have far mers fears that their stock and feed wiil . be short 360 Awarding Committees ........................... -. — . 360 Sorgho Syrup - . . . — . - . , „ , 330 F . ll Plowing . — . —360 Root Pits — . — —— . —360 See-to yonr Qardens-.. — . ——— . — . -,... 380 Western Agr...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Agriculture , as counfcttd with Schools , Col -leges , ami Public Institutions . ' . / [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

Agriculture , as counfcttd with Schools , Colleges , ami Public Institutions . . / Br ALU . H Gow , President of the Dixon Institute . X It has been well remarked , that the chief object of our schools , should be , not so much to acquire a definite amount of positive knowledge as to learn the art of learning , and acquire the disposition arid the taste to do so . Tailing to perceive this truth in education , many are prone to press upon the pupils of our schools a long and varied programme of positive studies , to be mastered absolutely within the few years of school life . The effort seems to be , to crowd facts , stubborn facts , into the mind , until the , passive recipient may be called a walking encyclopedia of useless knowledge , knowing a little of everything and but little of anything . * The study of books too often excludes the cultivation of those faculties which make us acquainted with things about us , so that many of the so-called educated pass from the schools seeing...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Health and What Promotes It . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

Health and What Promotes It . Dr . Prank Hamilton , in an address on hygiene , to the graduates of the Buffalo Medical College , discusses the subject of health and the causes which promote or injure it . We make a few extracts : STOVES AND FURNACES . Within a few years the air-tight stove has been substituted for the iron dogs , and for the first time since men have began to live in houses we have no fireplaces . The shrine of the Lares has been removed , and our houses have been literally pillaged—robbed of the domestie hearth , toward which so many associations has been poured , and which in all ages have been regarded as the symbol of home with all its social comforts . Not content with this , these enemies to our race have still more lately taken away the stoves , which , destitute of the essence , still occupied the places , and served to remind us at least of the ancient fireplaces ; and instead they have built for us iron furnaces—iEtnas—under ground , so that now what of th...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
The County Fair . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

The County Fair . Editor of the Farmer : —The fair of Sangamon county for 1859 , was a great success . I have attended the fairs in Sangamon for the last twenty-three years and there never has been as fine a one as that just closed . The Society adopted the unusual policy of admitting entries without requiring entry fees ; for the purchase of an exhibitor s ticket can hardly be construed as a fee—for every exhibitor wants to be present during the fair . The entries were unusually large , except in the cattle department , and the failure there , if it may be called such , grew out of the fact that the fine stock of this and the neig hboring counties had been jaded and worn down in some measure by attendance at previous fairs . There was present , however , fine cattle . The noble bull of J . N . Brown—which would take the first rank any where in the world was present—several other of his fine herd were also on hand ; the herds of J . H . Speers , of Menard county ; of J . C . Bone , ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Otxtiaiug . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

Otxtiaiug . Editor of the ¦ Farmer : —There has always been a question , whether orchards planted out in the fall would . do as well or better than planted out in the spring . Under favorable circumstances I thiuk it the better policy to plant out the trees in the tall . The favorable circumstances are these : The ground should be rolling and dry . It should be well prepared , by being plowed at least twelve inches deep . The trees should be taken from the nursery . The trees should be two Or three years old .- * They should be planted out well , the roots spread out , and every fibre possible be preserved when planted . A * small mound should be thrown around to prevent the trees from being shaken and the roots made loose in winter . To preserve them from rabbits , corn stalks can be tied about them—five will be enough—they should rise from the ground a foot or more . Nothing should be put about the trees to harbor mice . In the . spring take the mound of earth and cornstalks away ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Fall Plowing [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

Fall Plowing Editor of the Warmer : —I have Been articles in your paper recommending fall plowing The weather and the condition of the land is now suitable for this work , and if the ground is moderately rolling , there is evidence sufficient to satisfy me that it will pay . The work should be done well . Ground can be plowed in the fall to be sown in barley , spring wheat and oats early in the spring . We lose more of these crops from late sowing than any other cause . Plow your land in the fall for these crops ; plow well , and plow furrows to run off the water in winter . Do this now and you will much- lighten your spring work and at the same time be more sure of making crops . Such is the experience I have seen recorded in many cases . xtr

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Winter Schooling , ' - ««»~ f [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

Winter Schooling , - ««»~ f . Editor of the Farmer : —The season / has come for taking up winter schools . / Many of our boys and girls who hava worked hard in summer , will attend ! school this winter . \ I hope good teachers will be employed—men and women who love to teach and see that the children under their care improve . But these teachers should have the support and confidence of parents . They should not unnecessarily find fault with . them . Make the children understand that the teachers are doing the . best thing possible for them , and adopt measures to enable children and to induce them to give all their minds to study and require them to study branches of education which will be useful to them . Before they learn much else , let them learn to spell , to read and write , and get a knowledge of geography . These are , in my opinion , the foundations of all good and useful education . To put children on other studies before they have a knowledge of these , is wasting preci...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
The Autumn . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

The Autumn . Editor of the Farmer : —As a general fact , we have most beautiful autumns in this country . Our springs and winters are not usually pleasant ; our summers are hot—but our falls are beautiful . It is now the 13 th of October while I am writing . The sky is beautifully clear ; the weather is just what one would like for comfort ; the roads are as fine as can be ; and fall work can now be done most satisfactorily and rapidly . Indeed we have a glorious fall season . Let us improve the leisure time we have now in clearing up about our dwellings ; beautif ying our yards ; in planting out orchards , in plowing for spring crops ; in seeing to our schools ; in gathering our crops—and in other preparations for making ourselves comfortable through the winter months—_ to make them pleasant , which without cafe now , will be most dreary . A COUNTRYMAN .

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Seed Corn . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

Seed Corn . Editor of the Farmer : —I have been benefitted by the remarks in your paper heretofore on the necessity of saving seed corn in the fall . l ? or two years I have had no trouble with my seed corn ; and I think I improve and forward the crop by selectiug ears that have ripened early in the season . I would say to my brother farmers , if you have not saved your seed corn , do it now . And if you are not satisfied with the variety you cultivated , seek the liberty of selecting seed from your neighbor s i eld , where the corn suits you better . I believe it will be found best for us to have early and late corn . We want early corn for feeding out early to hogs and to stock . There are many varieties of early corn in the country , and it will not be difficult to make a selection of a variety that matures early and yields well . A little time given to ihis matter now , will save much difficult / and vexation in the spring . Farmers now must take such a course in farming as to s...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
The American Chestnut . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

The American Chestnut . In answer to an inquiry on the culture -of the chestnut , we give tho following from the North Western Farmer , communicated to that paper b y Mr . James Weed , of Muscatine , Iowa : Convinced of the great utility of this tree for our north-western climate , we propose to offer a few suggestions relative to its culture and the inducements it presents to cultivators . To begin with tho seeds ; these should be gathered fresh from the trees and immediately packed for transportation in such manner as not to heat or become dry . If to be two or three weeks in reaching their destination , we would pack in dry sand , or peihaps slightly damp- swamp moss would answer equally as well and not so heavy ; but if only two or three days , simply put up in small boxes or casks , containing from one-fourth to one-half bushel , not so close as to prevent a suitable ventilation , would probably answer as well as any mode . When received , they should be immediately mixed with ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
apr The Hog—Its History ; etc . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

apr The Hog—Its History ; etc . All the varieties of this animal originated in the Wild Boar ; which is considers d the root of the domestic hog . It is found in most of the temperate regions of Europe , Aisa and Africa , In England snd Scotland , a few centuries since , the Wild Boar chase was a sport iu great repute with the nobles . Shakespeare describes it with graphic accuracy . And if in those countries men are now better employed , the sport has now become obsolete . It is still practiced in India , and in those districts of Europe in which the auiinal still maintains his hold . He is now common in the extensive forests of France , Germany , Prussia and Hungary , as well as in Spain and some other countries . The hog is the only domestic animal , seemingly of no use to man when alive , and was therefore , as may be presumed , designed for food . The Jews , however , th . e Egyptians and other inhabitants of warm counrries , and all the Mahometans at present , reject the use o...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Washington County Fair . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

Washington County Fair . ASHLEY , ILLINOIS , OCT ., 16 , 1859 . It was my fortune to be here at the Fair of the Washington County Agricultural Society . The exhibition embrased the usual articles seen at the fairs . The fair and attendance were good . I shall not attemht to give particulars : Southern Illinois in a few years will not be behind any portion of the State , lor agricultural improvements . The most important staple I saw—at least it struck me as being so , was the specimens of corn on exhibition , belonging to G . B . Mason , a fanner living in the vicinity of this place . He has christened it the Douglas Com The specimens ate collossal , the ears measuring from 12 to 15 inches in length ; there are , 12 rows of kernels on each ear , counting 50 large kernels to the row ! Mr . Mason has five acres of the corn . The sample exhibited , was but a chance selection from his crop . Samples of this corn may be obtained fromL . C ; Tucker , of Ashley , who has a limited quantity...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Fall Business . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

Fall Business . A good deal of wheat has been shipped off , and much yet remains . We see no prospect of materially improved prices . The crop is light in all Central Illinois . A good many beef cattle are going forwarb , at low prices . The prospect is that cattle will not be high this winter . Stocks of hogs are moving to Chicago . We would not learn the prices paid for them . 5 } c nett is paid for hogs in Cincinnatij a tolerable good price . We do not believe that the crop of hogs is great , but while this is so , it is well known that much old pork is yet on hand . The crop of corn in Central Dlinois , is amply sufficient to fatten well , all fine hogs and cattle , designed for market .

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Fall Work . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

Fall Work . Seeding and much other farm work is over for the season . There is however , still much to do . Are our farmers prepared for winter ? Have they done their full plowing ? Have they provided Bhelter and comfort for their cattle . Have they secured their vegetables from frost ? Have they selected their seed corn ? Are their fences in condition to prevent cattle from going into their orchards and gardens . Have they made arrangements for wood 1 Are their houses in proper order to secure the inmates from the indemnities of winter ? Are the children and other members of the family provided with shoes and clothing for cold weather . Have they good schools , and is the school house in a condition to be comfortable , with good supplies of wood ? Have families newspapers and other reading , for the long evenings of winter ? Are all selling their crops , and making every effort to- pay debts , with a determination to make no new ones ? Here are important questions , and every farme...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Bull Times . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

Bull Times . Merchants complain that business is dull . How can it be otherwise , when farmers have little to buy with , and when they have been sufficiently scorched not to go upon trust , if they would . Had the same economy been practised for the last three years , the country would not be in the condition that it now is . We counsel economy , as far as possible . Live on the products of your farm .

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Fall Plowing . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

Fall Plowing . The ground was never in better order for plowing . Why are not the plows going for spting crops—spring wheat , flax , spring barley , oats and corn 1 Why not take time by the forelock ? Why should we see the boys and men sunning themselves by the stable , barn , house , when such an opportunity for benefiting themselves is presented ? Dont we know that nine times out of ten , we have much weather in spring unfavorable for plowing ? Dont all know that plowing in the fall , kills many weeds , many insects , and secures the ground in better order for spring sowing and planting , than it can possibly be when water follows the plow in the furrow ? We repeat , perhaps for the twentieth time , that the best crops of spring wheat and oats have been made from ground plowed in the fall .

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
"Root Fits . » [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

Root Fits . » Many farmers have not cellars , in which to save roots—beets , potatoes , carrots , cabbage , & c . They are compelled to put them in pits , for winter use . When this is required , the open field is the best place for a Boot Pit . They need veutilation . A warm spot is subject to too great and sudden changes , and in such places as the north side of a building or piece of woods , the cold penetrates deeper than there is any need of . Dig a trench two feet deep , and four feet wide , throwing the earth equally on each side . Then fill in the roots—beets , carrots , or potatoes or cabbages . h ill to the surface ol the ground , then pile them up as steep as they will lie . The angle of the two sides at the ridge should be a right angle . Cover them with two or three inches of straw , and then throw the earth on , and spat it down hard with the shovel . Ouce in eight feet an opcuing should be made in the ri . ge , a handful or two of straw loosened up ana pul...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
See to your Gardens . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

See to your Gardens . Now is the time to set out rose , gooseberry and currant plants , as well as all flowering shrubbery which starts early in the spring . Lawton Blackberries and Raspberriess hould now be planted out ; also strawberries , pie plants , flowering bulbs , Peonias and Lillies . You have more leisure to attend to these things now than you will have in the spring . On a very small space of ground you can raise all the small plants you need ; you can raise pie plant sufficient for all your wants—and besides have flowering shrubbery and Herbaceous flowering plants , to make your gardens beautiful—to attend to which will require but little labor .

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
UNKNOWN [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1859

Wait gtttwfe gmmx . SPRINGFIELD , NOVEMBER 1 , 18 S 9 .

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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