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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1902

The Indian Advocate 245 John K. Woman has been appointed to the position of laborer at the Blackfeet Indian agency, in place of Mr. Stabs Down. The latter, says Church Progress, should find conso lation in the fact that woman is displacing man everywhere, and doing it by stabbing down salaries. - The spirit of the age says " Worth means wealth, and wisdom the art of getting it." To be rich is considered by most persons a merit; to be poor, an offence. By this false standard it is not so important to be wise and good, as to be rich in worldly wealth; thus it is, everything, as well as every person, has its price, and may be bought or sold; and thus do we coin our hearts into gold and exchange our souls for earthly gain. Hence it is said "a man is worth so much" i. e., worth just as much as his property or money amount to, and no more. Thus wealth, worth or gain is not applied to science, to knowledge, virtue or happiness, but to pecuniary acquisition; as if nothing but gold were gain...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1902

246 The Indian Advocate. the ocean is in our ears and the tossing of the waves is be neath our keel, and the lands lessen from our eyes and the floods are lifted up around us and the earth loses sight of us and we take our last leave of earth and its inhabitants, and of our further voyage there is no witness but the Infinite and the Eternal. And do we still take so much anxious thought for future days, when the days which have gone b,y have so strangely and uniformly deceived us? Can we still so set our hearts on the creatures of God, when we find by sad expe rience the Creator only is perfect? Or shall we not rather lay aside every weight and every sin which doth most easily beset us, and think of ourselves henceforth as wayfaring per sons only, who have no abiding inheritance but in the hope of a better world, and to whom even that world would be worse than hopeless if it were not for our Lord Jesus Christ and the interests we have obtained in His mercies. 4? IRELAND She turns and...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1902

247 -" The Indian Advocate. $ j: Hawaii Its Missions and Its People, jj $ )n t nttnmKmx Rk HQHTOII'in A rnKmolnrtrt onmnt-lmnc rrA fV n "Paradise of the Pacific," was long unknown to the rest ,of the world. But Juan de Gaetano, a Spanish navigator, discovered one of the islands in 1542; and following in his wake, Quiros, his countryman, some years afterwards, had a glimpse of the islands from a distance. We are also told that when Commodore Anson captured a Spanish ship, in 1742, a map of these islands was found on board, marked incorrectly as to longitude, but located somewhere in the vicinity of the group. Native traditions also mention occasional visits of foreign ships previous to Captain Cook's discovery. This famous navigator sighted the island of Kauai in the month of January, 1778, and discovered that of Hawaii shortly after. To him, Hawaii was the island of destiny. It was the last of his discoveries the termination of his glorious career; it added, indeed, fresh laurels to...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1902

248 The Indian Advocate. Hawaii made known to the world; but it ranked for more than fifty years afterwards among the dark corners of the earth. We shall speak of the steps taken for the enlighten ment of the Hawaiians, after glancing at some of the phys ical features and remarkable phenomena of the famous group a group which is at present attracting the interest of America and the attention of the world. The Hawaiian Islands, two thousand one hundred miles from San Francisco, are located just within the Tropic of Cancer. They are eleven in number, eight of which are in habited, namely: Hawaii, Maui, Kahoolawe, Lani, Molokai, Oahu, Kauai and Nuhau. The largest of these islands is Hawaii; it is go miles in length and 74 in breadth, and con tains 4,210 square miles, a much greater area than that of all the other islands put together. Maui and Oahu are next in size. On the latter stands Honolulu, the capital, a flourish ing city of about 30,000 inhabitants. It is pleasantly situ ated n...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1902

The Indian Advocate. 249 The lava-flows from this mountain in 1868 and 1887 de stroyed much valuable pasture land. That of 1868 was ac companied by severe earthquakes, such as were never before experienced by the oldest inhabitant. It was then that a flow of heated mud gushed out from the side of Mauna Loa. It ran down the declivity with great velocity, destroying in its way a number of native houses; and, without a moment's warning, thirty-five people and many cattle were buried alive by this fatal eruption. At the same time a tidal wave rush ing along the coast of Kau, carried out to sea and drowned no less than forty-five of the inhabitants. At the village of Honuapo, the sea rose and swept away the church, leaving not a vestige behind; but, singular to relate, the bell was afterwards cast ashore by the waves, and anon, replaced in the steeple of a new edifice, built on a higher elevation, it still calls the people to Mass and to prayers as in days of yore. On the side of the sam...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1902

250 The Indian Advocate. feet below the highest point. This is broken in two places by gaps, known respectively as the Koolau and Kaupo gaps. Through these, in past times, the lava ran to the sea. All the other islands contain extinct craters, a certain proof of their volcanic formation. Co?icluded in our Se ft ember Issue. It Is My Duty. 'm URING the Civil War a priest approached the com manding officer of the Federal troops that had fallen back after a sharp skirmish with the Confederates, and requested a pass to get out beyond the lines. 'There are," said the father, "a number of wounded soldiers in the camp beyond." "But," said the commander, "the pickets of both lines are at close quarters, and you may be shot." "It is my duty to administer to the spiritual wants of the wounded," replied the priest with much firmness and persist ence, "and danger is a secondary consideration." The commander, with eyes full of admiration, called an orderly and gave directions to have the priest ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1902

M u The Indian Advocate 251 r The FellowTraveler. 1 E was eroiner awav. all alone, alone the merged 11 path of life, the pure and tender-hearted youth, witn a generous soui ana an lnaomuaDie energy. As he went, at the dawn of day, his heart was heavy; and, concealing some tears, he pressed his hand upon his throbbing heart, nor dared he once more look back upon the home he had just left. For there his mother remained, and she had said to him: "My child, it is time for you to depart. Go, then. In a few years you will come back and bring comfort and happiness to your old mother, who will be waiting for you in the home of your childhood. I wish I were able to accompany you, my son, in your long journey, for it is hard for man to travel alone; but I am not .able. Look, then, for a friend, my child, who will keep you company on your way, for youth is full of allurement, and many shall offer themselves. Choose well, therefore, my son, and let him whom you shall prefer be the angel who kep...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1902

252 The Indian Advocate. "What is'your name?" "Glory is my name." "This is not the name my mother told me. You are not he whom I look after. Go your way." And farther on he trod upon the rugged path of life, when his whole being thrilled with a sweet emotion, and he heard a voice enchanting as a shepherd pastoral melody in the valley, who said: "Will you have me in your company?" "What is your name?" "Pleasure is my name." "That is not the name my mother told me; go your way." The sun had already passed over its zenith, and as the tender-hearted youth went along his pilgrimage it seemed to him as though his feet were smoothly gliding over the mead ows. He heard a voice soft as the morning breeze, sweet as a mother's lullaby: "Wouldn't you have me to keep you company?" "What is your name?" "My name is Love." "That is not the name my mother told me; go your way." And as the evening sun was rapidly setting in the horizon and the young traveler felt more sad than in the morning, on acco...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1902

The Indian Advocate. 253 - J I PHest and Preacher, jj & j -- T no time in all the year do we find a more marked contrast between the labors of the priest and those of the preacher than at the period when the scorching sun of summer is upon us. It brings to mind quite clearly a great distinction between Catholicity and Protestantism which ought to arrest the attention of those who are seeking religious truth. W-; refer to the mid-summer outing of ministers. The Catholic priest takes his vacation as well as the Prot estant preacher. He is entitled to it. Few men labor more arduously than he, and consequently few are more deserving of rest and recreation. But when he goes, there is always another to take his place. If he cannot so arrange matters he must remain at his post. Not so the preacher. When the time arrives for his outing he is away; the church is closed and worship is at an end until his return. Plainly, therefore, appears the two systems for which each stands namely, obl...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1902

254 The Indian Advocate. fr compel their attendance. They are free to worship God, they think, when it suits them, and not at all if so inclined. At all times God is secondary; the convenience of the creature is made paramount to the worship of the Creator. j First Mass of Rev, Fr, Hildebrand Zoeller , O, S, B. HE rfilnhrntinn nf n first Mass is nlwavs an event of great I importance and rejoicing in every parish. But the first Mass sung by Rev. D. Hildebrand Zoeller, O. S. B., has more than a passing significance for Sacred Heart Mission; for since all the years the Fathers founded the Mission, Rev. Fr. Hildebrand is the first young man of the immediate neigh borhood ever raised to the dignity of the priesthood. No wonder, then, that the members of the Community, as well as all the faithful who attend divine services at the Mission, could hardly await the day that would glad den the hearts of all. And as the family of the neo-presbyter is well known throughout this part of the count...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1902

The Indian Advocate 255 with us, from Saturday noon the weather was simply ideal, so that the roads became good and the temperature inour little church would be much milder than usual. It was therefore not at all surprising how the friends and ac quaintances of the new priest were on the ground to be witnesses of the coming celebration. If ever there was a procession that was gazed at with admiring eyes, you should have read the countenances of all around when the bell began to ring and upon the front porch of the monastery the Cross bearer made his appearance. The young priest, accompanied by the usual officers on such occasions, clad in the best vestments the Mission possesses, emerged from the sitting-room of the Abbey, preceded by his brothers in Religion and followed by a throng of people, marched toward the church. All eyes were riveted upon the celebrant till the nd of the celebration. For such purpose they seemed to have assembled, rather than to fulfil the com mand of the C...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1902

256 The Indian Advocate. 4 n .;"y.T,,t''T,, Master Eldridge Dietrick, of Shawnee, Okla., came to visit his future school. Mrs. M. Gallimore, nee Peltier, a Pottawatomie Indian, died June 25 and was buried by Rev. Fr. Blaise, June 27. R. I. P. Rev. Fr. Aloysius, O. S. B., was sent to Texarkana, Tex., to help the Ven. Fr. Barbin, the pastor, who is stricken down with paralysis. Rev. Frs. Meinrad and Placidus will spend their vacations in Texas, doing parish work the former in Rhineland and the latter in Oak Cliff. The population of Pottawatomie County, as given by the returns just made public by County Assessor Bristow, is 38,036. Pretty soon our county will be the most populous of Oklahoma. July 20 the handsome new church of El Reno, Okla., was solemnly dedicated to the service of Almighty God by the Bishop. Rev. Fr. Con stantine, O. S. B., is to be congratulated for his achievements. As we go to press the weather is dry and sultry and rain is needed by the growing crops, especially ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

4 The Indian Advocate Vol. XIV. SEPTEMBER, 1902. No. 9 THE NAME OF MARY. It is lovely today it was lovely of old When the tale of the infant Redeemer was told, The chosen of God, in her mission sublime, The sweetest of names in the history of time. O'er the plains of Judea the night mists were chill, On Galilee's bosom the shadows lay still, When it woke in the midnight so solemn and mild, With the beat of a heart and the cry of a child. And bright with the lustre and sweet with the tone Of the angels that sang and the glory that shone; Its echoes are soft through the haze of the years, With the breath of her sigh and the dew of her tears. And still at the cradle and still at the hearth, From the manger of Christ to the ends of the earth, As radiant in glory, as steadfast in gloom, It serves at His side as it waits at His tomb. And many shall bless it as many have blest From the morning of toil to the evening of rest; And its fullness of meaning the music shall keep While a Mary sha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

258 The Indian Advocate. I 4 & 4? tf : The Muskogees, Their Early History Origin of the Creek Confederation. F the aborigines that dwelt east of the Mississippi flp the Muskogees were the most powerful and the must aggressive. inuring ine suuggie ueiween Cortez and Montezuma, this people formed a sep arate republic on the northwest of Mexico, and lent their aid to the Mexican monarch in the de fense of his country against the Spanish invader. But Cortez being finally successful, and the Muskogees being unwilling to submit to Spanish tyranny, they determined to move eastward and and form a new government. Accordingly the whole tribe took up the line of march in the year 1520, and, after a jour ney of six months, came to Red river where they settled for a time game and fish being very plentiful. Here they first met with the Alabamas, also supposed to be a wandering tribe from the West. A large body of the latter attacked and killed several of a Muskogee hunting party, and this in ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

The Indian Advocate 259 Muskogees and driven to the Ohio, and finally to the Yazoo river, where in 1541 their fortress was besieged and destroyed by De Soto, the Spanish invader. From the time the Muskogees had left Mexico to their settling on the Ohio river, fifteen years had elapsed. The new country suited them in every respect, while their num bers and prowess enabled them to subjugate the other and less powerful tribes. Still pursuing the Alabamas, they drove them from the Coosa and Tallapoosa rivers, while they also subjugated the tribes on the Okmulgee, Oconee and Ogeche rivers. Pickett is accountable for the statement that the Uchee, a powerful and warlike tribe living on the Savannah, were con quered and carried into slavery by the Muskogees in the year 1620. The Tuckabatches, a tribe almost depleted in their wars with the Hurons and Iroquois of the North, treated with the Muskogees in 1703 and became a part of their nation, as did also the Alabamas, who realized the fact th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

260 The Indian Advocate. observed, the plates being kept buried under the Micco (or king's) cabin in Tuckabatche until the annual Green Corn Dance, when on the fourth day they were brought to light by one of the high prophets and cleaned, after which was en acted the ceremony of the Brass Plate Dance. When the Tuckabatches, in 1836, took up the line of march for the Indian Territory, these plates were carried by six chosen warriors, led by Spoke-oak Micco, their chief. They were strapped behind their backs, and the bearers were not permitted to speak or otherwise communicate with a member of the emigration party, they being obliged to walk one mile in advance of the others. To the present day the old customs are adhered to, and the brass plates are sacredly hidden until the fourth day of the Tuckabatche busk or corn dance, when they are used as above described. The full bloods believe that great danger, and even fatality, is in store for him who touches, or even looks intently at th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

The Indian Advocate. 261 while those of Coweta, Cussetah, Hitchetee, Wetumka and Okmulgee were prominent among the Lower towns. Apart, and without any direct connection with these towns, are the eight original clans of Muskogees, viz: The Wind, Bear, Tiger, Deer, Bird, Raccoon, Snake and Fox. The first men tioned, and the two following, were esteemed by historians as the most aristocratic. The Creek Confederacy was under the government of one great chief, prince or king, chosen from the original or mother tribe in early days, but since 1800 the Hickory Ground and Tuckabatches have both supplied chief rulers. Subordinate to the chief ruler were two inferior chiefs of the Upper and Lower towns. The former chose their chiefs from the Tuckabatches and the latter from the Cowetas. Every town had its own king, or magistrate, who represented his people at the general council. This individ ual held office for life, and was succeeded by his nephew. He bore the name of his town with the word ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

lu . j i ' ii sf j , ijpppippwpwmiw i 262 The Indian Advocate. Being punctual at the appointed rendezvous, the grand chief placed himself at the head of his army and the march commenced. The Muskogees were brave to a reckless and desperate degree, so that defeat did not discourage them as was well proven in their wars with the United States, when it required the utmost efforts of General Jackson and his armies to subjugate them. One of the ancient laws among the Muskogees, one which was adhered to very strictly, was that no member of the tribe should marry within his own clan. Every child belonged to its mother's clan. It was therefore customary for the young warrior to apply to the uncle or maternal relatives of the girl for the necessary consent. This being granted, the lover usually killed a deer and laid it outside the door of the young woman's wigwam. If the present was accepted it was a good indication, but if it was suffered to remain untouched, the wooer might then consider ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

The Indian Advocate. 263 fallen in battle, then these joyous songs were intermingled with wailing and mournful sounds. Such national calamities were attributed to the crimes of the people, and pardon was thereupon invoked. Before the feast commenced the "Black Drink" was handed round. This drink was composed of the leaves of a small bush known by them as arsee. It was drank in large quantities, and being a powerful emetic, had the effect of cleansing their stomachs so thoroughly that they were in a fair way of being able to do justice to the feast of boiled corn, which frequently lasted for days at a time. During their festival, should a criminal or culprit escape from his bonds and make his way into the charmed circle, or into the square, during the dance, he was considered as under the protection of the Great Spirit, and his pardon was secured. One of the proofs which might be used to favor the argu ment that the American aborigines are of Asiatic descent, was the Creek custom of ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 September 1902

264 The Indian Advocate. Hawaii Its Missions and Its People, j wmmmmm Concluded from September Issue. UT it is time now to speak of the Missions, and Bof the means taken for Christianizing the Ha- one of the most degrading forms of polytheism, is foreign to our subject. The first attempt for their conversion was made by American mission aries from Boston. A company of three adven turers landed at Kailua, Hawaii, in 1820, the year after the death of the great king Kame hameha, who, a few years previously, had sub dued, or reduced to a state of vassalage, all the other kings (for in the old limes each of the larger islands had a king of its own) and consolidated the Hawaiian monarchy. This re markable man, more enlightened than any of his compat riots, was well aware of the absurdity and utter worthlessness of paganism, using it only as a cloak to cover his ambitious designs. But no sooner was he dead than his son and successor, Kamehameha II., broke the tabu and the restrictions of t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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