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Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857) Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 3,401 items from Boston Pilot (1838-1857), samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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“THE WORLD’S CONVENTION” [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

“THE WORLD’S CONVENTION” Mr. Editor, —What did that call of the condensed elements of Protestantism bring forth in its central metropolis, London? Like unto many other great affairs, it brought forth wind. • As the boy said “ ’tis hard to get blood out of a turnip.” But who does not know that the object of that Convention was to ascertain, by calling together ull the fragments of Protestant- ism, the truth of their Church; “because,” say they, “if one or another of us is in error, surely when we shall have all the chips and shavings of our church, with its trunk, we cannot he mistaken; and more* ! over we will then have Brother Dudly from Ireland, and Sir Cullen, with our ! greatest men; and oh! if we shall succeed in working miracles, (and they say Brother George is a Saint, and we must have several others), 1 shall go the whole for a Church established.” Sir, these gentry heard that Ireland wa3 famous for Saints, and they should have some of the “Brethren” from that land of name, ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

TE KT II EXTRA CTED WITHOIT rain. For years, surgeons and dentists Imve vainly sought lor some means to alleviate puin while severe operations were taking place. Many an individual has gone to his grave, through a dread ol suffering, who might have been saved had he been willing to place himself in the hands oi the surgeon; and persons have suffered lor many a long year with their Teeth, rather than submit to have them extracted. It is acknowledged that extracting teeth is one of the most painful operations in surgery, but tiie pain being momentary, is not so generally pe'reeived. To remove all these dillieulties, and allow even the most sensitive an opportunity for the performance of any surgical or dental operation, 1)R. MORTON has ‘discovered a compound to alleviate pain. lie can, alter administering it, extract a tooth, and the patient will not he sensib eol the slightest pain. He has done it in repeated instances, lie has made arrangements to extract Teeth, using his Compound, ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

REMOVAL! The subscriber respectfully informs his patrons Bnd the public generally that he has removed hie establishment from No. 22 Kingston street to bio. 18 Exchange street. n9l-3t JAMES LEE. Groceries ami provisions, tent & UAIRD, Nos. 9E and 95 Essex street, beg to in form their friends and former patrons, that having refittei their old stand, recently destroyed hv fire, they can notv of ffer fbr sale an entire new stock of Goods, at Cush Prices ohe sent free of expense to any part m the city. .1 an WALTER .1. WALSH, COUNSELLOR & ATTORNEY AT LAW. Office, Court Square West side of tile Court House. Jau3 Timothy Noonan, sexton of south bos ton Burial Ground, has Removed to Fourth stre el between C and I) streets, South Boston tf Jan3 FURNITURE NOTICE. JAMES QUIGLEY has removed from 34 Milk street, to the corner o, Beach and Washington streets, in the building formerly occupied by the Washington Bank, and nearly opposite o vision Market tf Jan 3 TA HOKE who ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 3 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

Notices of this kind inserted four times for $1 INFORMATION WANTED. Of EDIVaRD and MARY LOOBY, natives of Comer curry, co. Roscommon. When last heard from, Mary lived in Cedar street, New York. They are supposed to be in Boston, Ms. Any information respecting them will be thankfully received by Patrick Looby, Capitol Hill, Washington City, D.C, uni—4t Of FRANCIS I.OUGHRAN, a native of St. Andrew, N. S. When last heard from he was in Boston, Ms. Any information ol him will be thankfully received by his uncle, Hugh Rice, Pittsburg, Pa, in cure of W. 15. MeConlogue. iiil—4t Ol MICHAEL HOLLERAN, parish of Kilcomron. co. Galway. When last heard ot he was in Worcester, Ms. He left Ireland about 5 years ago. His sister, Ann Holleran, now living in Waltham, and his I'rieiis, Michael Broderick, are anxious to hear from him for important reasons. Address, care of John McCawley, Waltham, Ms, Of ANDREW GLYNN, native of Dublin, who came to this country 12 years ago. lie is a gardaner by trade. W...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Foreign. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

Foreign. FRANCE. The Courrier Francois mentions a report that several French regiments had been ordered to advance towards the frontiers of Switzerland, with a view to form a corps of observation, the head-quarters of which will be established at Gex. Spain. Our accounts from Madrid are of the 9th instant. The person arrested on the charge of .meditating the assassination of the Duke de Montpensier was insane, and was to be confined in a lunatic asylum. Mr. Bulwer returned to Madrid in the evening of theSth. The Gazette publishes the royal decree for levying 25,000 re-' cruits. Mr. Richard Cobden had arrived at Madrid. ROME. Private letters from Rome of the 3d ultimo state, tnat the Pope had been asked by several Italian governments if it was his intention to propose a federation of Italy, on the plan suggested by the Abbe Gioberti. The Pope was said to have replied, that he did not mean to raise any banner, but that he was determined to be master within his own dominions, and to ad...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Movements of Sectarians. THE EVANGELICAL ALLIANCE DESCRIBED BY ONE WHO KNOWS THEM WELL. Abridged From Saunders' Dublin News Letter. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

Movements of Sectarians. THE EVANGELICAL ALLIANCE DESCRIBED BY ONE WHO KNOWS THEM WELL. Abridged From Saunders' Dublin News Letter. Oil Wednesday evening, pursuant to advertisement, a publie meeting was held at the Music Hall, Abbey street, for the purpose of hearing Mr. Lloyd Garrison’s address on the subject of the abolition of slavery. The seats round the promenade being well occupied, while the body of the hall was totally deserted. On the platform therd were the following:—Messrs. Garrison and Wright, of America; Messrs. Richard anil James Webb, Richard Allen, and Win. Shortt. Shortly before eight o’clock, Mr. James Haughton, was called to the chair. Mr. Garrison, who was received, we are informed,with partial applause, proceeded to address the meeting in* eloquent terms upon the subject of American slavery. In the course of that address he passed the following high panegyric upon the Liberator of Ireland, and denounced, in the subjoined indignant terms, the hypocrisy of the Ev...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
The Fine Arts. THE STATUE' OF THE LIBERATOR. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

The Fine Arts. THE STATUE' OF THE LIBERATOR. We announced in former publications the arrival of Hogan’s statue of the Liberator, and the factffef its erection in the Royal Exchange, where it is now exposed to public view. It is placed under the north western arch of the area of the Royal Exchange; approaching from Parliament street, it stands on the right hand side, and the spectator obtains no view of it till, entering under the dome, it comes upon him "at once with commanding effect. We feel we could not add to the eloquent and artistic description of the statue, which our Roman correspondent forwarded to us last year, we therefore reprint it, merely pressing, as there may appear some hesitation about the likeness, that we regard it as by far the best of O’Connell we have ever seen, either from the palette or the chisel. It is idealized to a certain extent, but in the same manner as Vandyke has idealized the portrait of Charles the Secoud. The artist has studied the life, the char...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Correspondence. REPEAL IN BALTIMORE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

Correspondence. REPEAL IN BALTIMORE. To the Editor of the Boston Pilot: Sir, —In communicating to you the address of the Baltimore Repeal Association, delivered by Philip C. Freise, chairman of the committee appointed to prepare an address to the public, I promised to send you a report of the proceedings. On Tuesday the 13th of October, I attended an adjourned meeting of the Baltimore Repeal Association. In the absence of the president, on motion of Mr. McLaughlin, P. C. Freise, Esq, was called to the chair, who in a few words expressed to the society his sense of the honor done him. The secretary read the proceedings of the meeting of the 7th, which were adopted. Mr. McLaughlin, from the committee appointep to district the city for the purpose of having it collected, submitted the following report, viz: “To tlie Baltimore Repeal Association—Your Committee, to whom was referred to divide the city into districts tor the purpose of having it collected, respectfully report that they ha...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CANADA. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

CANADA. Gananoque, November 10 th, ’46. To the Editor of the Boston Pilot: Sir, —We daily witness with pleasure, the interest you take in the progress of our holy Catholic Religion, and your able advocacy of its tenets and truths, when circumstances require such: and judging from the general tenor of your conduct heretofore, as Editor of the Pilot, we presume to trespass on your columns for the insertion of the following hasty remarks, in reference to a subject, which will, no doubt, afford you and your readers, as much heart-felt pleasure and delight, as it has ns, and the inhabitants of our fastthriving village, of all hues of religious worship. The village of Gananoque, and its immediate surrounding districts, have experienced for the last week, much evident interest and anxiety, as it had been pretty generally known, that the Right Rev. Dr. Phelan, Catholic Bishop of Kingston, would preach, and administer the sacrament of Confirmation in the Catholic Church of the village, on Su...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
O’CONNELL’S POSITION. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

O’CONNELL’S POSITION. THE PILOT. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 21. IS4O. W e have observed, or thought we observed, a circumstance lately, and we see no reason why we should go about to deny it, or make a mystery about it. It is this: One or two of our correspondents appear to us to have been putting forth feelers to try if they could shake the confidence which American Repealers place in O’Connell, as if they thought by skilful and persevering efforts, it would be expedient and practicable to throw him overboard. It has been said that attempts were made to assail his honest} 7 ; we have seen no such thing; we believe those writers regard his integrity as unimpeachable, and out of the question, or above all question; but they write as if they think either that his wisdom and prudence are unequal to all the emergencies of his great umlertaking, or that his position is too difficult to permit his success without the aid of Smith O’Brien and Young Ireland. Now, though we have expressed our views ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CREDIT. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

CREDIT. The other day, as we were turning over some weekly papers, we came upon the Protestant Telegraph; and there was a long and lamentable complaint against the Protestant Unionist, Pittsburg, and the Jlntipapist, Cincinnati, for taking the Telegraph's articles without acknowledgement. The bitterest part of the complaint referred to certain “Excerpts from Roman Catholic Papers” which, it seems, had been borrowed, and no credit given; a proceeding which the Telegraph declared was not “credtf-able.” Being, curious to see what it was all about, we turned over to the precious “Excerpts;” for there was one of the series in the same number. As soon as we looked at them, we felt a sensation like that of a man who unexpectedly finds himself before a mirror. The paragraphs were our own!—our translations from Le Propagateur Calholique!— clipped up, and put together again in such a way that we had to pore a little over them before we could make out where every piece came from, and what it b...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE TWO BIRDS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

THE TWO BIRDS. BY SAMUEL LOVER. I. A bright bird lived in a golden cage, So gently tended by groom and page, And a wild bird came, her rimnn to nee, And xHid, “ 1 wi»h 1 could live like thee ; For thou canxt sing, Ami prune thy wing, While dainty fare, Thy slaves prepare.” The wild bird came, her pomp to see, And said, “ I wish 1 could live like thee !” 11. Then from the cage came a plaintive voice, Which bade the wild bird to rejoice; “ For I’d give my golden cage,” said she, “ For thy humble perch on the wild-wood tree; For thou canst sing, On freedom’s wing— These bars of gold, A slave enfold ; I’d give my golden cage,” said she, “ For thy humble perch on the wild-wood tree.” 111. Then, when the bird of the wild-wood knew The bright one weary of bondage grew, He set the plaintive captive free. And away they flew singing “ Liberty!” In joy they rome, Their leafy homo, And trill the lay, The live-long day— The lay of love, from hearts set free, For love was blest with Liberty ! For...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
TEMPERANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

TEMPERANCE. Mr. Editor , —l beg leave, through the columns of your paper, to make a few reremarks on a speech delivered by a Mr. Adamson before Father Mathew’s Total Abstinence Society, on Sunday, the lstinst. It may appear strange to the superficial mind, that any person could take exceptions to anything advanced on the occasion in question, as the ty-guments, with one or two exceptions, were pretty plausible, and the mode of expression somewhat fascinating; but it required no great amount of discrimination to perceive that the speaker was governed more by the law of nature, than of grace. Throughout the whole tenor of his remarks, the broad principles of modern infidelity were clearly perceptible to the Catholic mind. But with the general tenor of his remarks I am not immediately concerned; if others approve of his philosophical reasoning, they may; 1, for one, am convinced of the insufficiency of the law of nature, unaided by the law of grace, to effect the social and moral eleva...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Fourth Annual Report OF ST. VINCENT’S ORPHAN ASYLUM. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

Fourth Annual Report OF ST. VINCENT’S ORPHAN ASYLUM. The Directors of this institution respectfully present to the Catholics of Boston and its vicinity, the following Report of its present condition, and of its transactions tor the past year. There are at present, supported at the Asylum, thirty-six children, of w hich number twenty-two are orphans, who are beneficiaries of the several Churches, viz: From the Church of the Holy Cross Nine. “ Si. Mary’s, Emlicull si .Four. “ St. Patrick’s, Northamptonst Three. “ SS. Peter umi Paul, South Uoalon Three. “ St. John tile llapilbt’s, Aloou at Two. “ St. Charlestown One. The remainder (fourteen,) are supported at the Asylum by private contribution. There have occurred among the inmates, since the last annual report, two deaths, —which, when we take into consideration, that some of them, when received, were in an extreme state of wretchedness and destitution, is by no means a large number. Two of the children, having arrived at a suitable a...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
IRISH GIRLS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

IRISH GIRLS. About a week ago, a wretch, whose name we would publish if we knew it, advertised in one of the papers for a servant to go a short distance into the country. From the crowd of applicants he selected a plump and pretty Irish girl, promising her easy work, kind treatment, and good wages. Being newly arrived, ignorant, and quite friendless, she put entire confidence in these promises, and taking all her worldly goods in a bundle, not remarkably heavy, she accompanied her “masther” across the Jersey city ferry, and took her seat in the cars. Of course she could not tell what direction she was going, how fast, or how far; and after a ride which did not seem very long, they came to Philadelphia, and went to a house which she supposed to be the house she was in quest of. When we add that the man was a viilian, the house one of ill fame, it is hardly necessary to describe the scene which followed. The rascal was foiled, and was glad to compromise, by agreeing to reconduct his i...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
IRISH ITEMS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

IRISH ITEMS. Preparations. A long and gratifying advertisement has been issued by the Board of Works, from which much is augured. I'he Board calb foe contracts to be sent in on or before tne 30th inst., for supplying some 60,000 or 70,000 wheelbarrows, immense quantities of clay-picks, quarry-picks, and other implements for road labor. There are about 100 towns mentioned at which tl\ese tools are to be delivered. At Dundalk, for instance, 1,500 barrows, with a corresponding number of picks, &c., are to be delivered. At Dublin, 1,000; Cork, 1,000; Youghal, 1,000; at several of the smaller towns 500 each, and a few are marked down for 250 each. The mere manufacture of these articles will give immense employment, j but the importance of the advertisement is in the assumption that the implements are to be supplied gratuitously to the laborers, and that they are to be instructed in a higher class of work than mere digging and shoveling.— Dublin Evening Post. Export of food fr...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ITEMS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

ITEMS. Congress is to meet Dec. 7. and the session will close on the 4th of March, when the congress expires. » The new constitution of New York has been adopted by 50 to 75,000 majority. “\ou look like dealTi on the pale horse,” said a gentleman to a toper who was pale and emaciated. “I don’t know anything about that,” said the toper, “but I’m death on pale brandy.” Jersey city is to be the terminus of the Cunard line of steamsphips lobe established between New York and Liverpool. Mr. Cunard, in behalf of the cofhpany, has made a contract for wharves there, with store-houses for merchandise, coal, &cj. amounting to $40,000, and petitioned the common council to second the undertaking with its sanction. The steamers are to run every other week. The receipts of flour by the Western road from Albany, four days last week amounted to over eleven thous and barrels; beside large quantities of provisions,butter, wool, &c. Is Nativism Dead? That was a disputed qeestio...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 7 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 7 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 21 November 1846

Business Department. THE BOSTON PILOT 18 PRINTED AND PUBLISHED DV THE PROPRIETOR, PATRICK DONAHOEf On every Saturday morning, at No 1 Spring Lane, near Washington Street, Muss. TERMS... .§2.so—if paid within three months from the time of subscribing—otherwise §3 will be charged. §1.50 for six months. Four months §l. * EF No paper discotninued until all arrears are paid up Cr Letters not post-paid (except from Agents) ar# not released from the Foat-otflce. We publish the following for the benefit of postmasters many of whom do uot send proper receipts;— Post Office, , , . To the Post Master at Boston:— Sir—l have this day received 9 for subsciption to the “ Boston Pilot,” with which I have charged myself in my accounts with the Government, and given the publish, er an order on you for the amount, which you will please pay on presentation. , P.M. The following is a convenient form for the receipt requisite to be sent, simultaneously, to us;— Received 8 for subscriptions to the Boston ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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