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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1997

February 1997 Law may be amended (Continued from page 1) which would cover wolf dogs and coyote dog mixes. The Humane Society asked legislators to give localities the authority to adopt laws that ban wolf dogs. During the 1996 General Assembly session, the Humane Society and other groups asked lawmakers to adopt what was tantamount to a ban of wolf dogs. Lawmakers considered a proposal known as House Bill 929, which would have required owners to obtain a permit, sterilize their wolf dog or hybrid canine, have the owner's Social Security number tattooed on the animal's leg and keep it locked up at all times. Failure to comply with the provisions could have resulted in a Class I misdemeanor and disposal of the hybrid canine. Legislators last year turned down House Bill 929 because many felt it would not be enforceable. Many wolf dogs are similar in appearance to German shepherds and Siberian huskies. Some feared that if wolf dogs were banned, then others might be next. Lawmakers may d...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1997

Farm Bureau News VA cotton production reaches record hiah By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor We wear it, sleep on it and even eat its seed oil. Cotton is a big part of our lives, and Virginia cotton growers are producing more and more of it each year. Cotton has been cultivated in Virginia for 380 years. In 1996, production reached an all-time high of 150,000 bales. The previous record was set in 1995, with 137,000 bales. A bale weighs about 500 pounds and is enough cotton to produce 215 pairs of jeans or 3,085 diapers or 6,436 women's knit briefs, according to the National Cotton Council of America. Production of cotton has undergone slumps. It sank to only 100 bales In Virginia in 1978, mostly because of low demand. With their wrinkle-free feature, synthetic materials made wrinkle-prone cotton clothing less desirable in the 19705. In addition, the boll weevil caused problems for Virginia growers. Cotton's share of the retail apparel and home furnishings market dropped to a his...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1997

February 1997 Long-term care insurance now available By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist RICHMOND—More than 40 percent of all Americans over age 65 will enter a nursing facility. Many of them won't have the resources to pay for their stay. The average cost for nursing facility care is $30,000 to $50,000 annually, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The average stay is more than two years. That's $75,000 to $125,000 each person who enters a nursing home may have to pay. Medicare pays only for skilled nursing home care. Nationwide, Medicare pays only 2 percent of long-term care costs, according to the Health Insurance Association of America. However, if you're a Virginia Farm Bureau Federation member, help is available for paying nursing home and other long-term health care costs. The VFBF is offering its members a long-term health care insurance product through TYigon Blue Cross Blue Shield. The coverage includes five choices —three comprehensive ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1997

Farm Bureau News Young farmers need to look more toward the future This year marks a new beginning for the Young Farmers' Committee. We have a voice on the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Board of Directors now, thanks to a VFBF bylaw change that became effective in late 1996. For the first time ever, we can vote on issues that are just as important to us as they are to older farmers. It's important that we get involved because it seems the number of young farmers continues to drop each year. According to the Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service, there are no surveys that determine how many young farmers are involved in agriculture. However, the state census from the last 18 years indicates that the average age of Virginia farmers has increased, leading state statisticians to speculate that the number of young farmers has decreased. In 1978, the average age of Virginia farmers was 52.9. By 1992, the age had increased to 55.6. Young farmers are crucial to the future of agricultur...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1997

February 1997 VFBF members help make national policies By JOHNNA MILLER VFBF Radio/Video Producer NASHVILLE—"Setting the Tone for Agriculture" was not just the theme for the 78th American Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention. It was also a goal for the 8,000 farm leaders from throughout the nation who attended the gathering in Nashville Jan. 4-9. Many aspects of agriculture have changed since the passage of the 1996 Farm Bill, and so delegates set policies, listened to distin- guished speakers and attended marketing and commodity conferences to help them survive in the new environment. Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's eight voting delegates worked to amend policies on issues of concern, which included opposition to a new IRS policy of taxing a farmer's income from deferred payment contracts, and the need for revisions in federal estate tax rules that could be detrimental to the environment and landowners. AFBF voting delegates from PMNKILLER It works better than a pain pill! mm...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1997

Farm Bureau News (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. > Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. > Please TYPE or PRINT your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. (You do not have to use this coupon.) * Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I DEADLINE: Ads must be received by the IOTH of each month preceding publication month. I Repeat ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. (For your convenience we are providing this coupon. Please submit ads to the Farm Bureau News before the 10th.) NAME: MEMBER NO.: COUNTY: ADDRESS: CITY: STATE: ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER: ( ) AD...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1997

February 1997 Women's conference scheduled for March 2-4 A fun-filled presentation on health and self-confidence is one of several features on tap for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Women's Conference March 2-4 in Charlottesville. The agenda includes a workshop by author Jolene Brown; our new contest, the Creative Commodity Revue; and a special Agriculture in the Classroom auction. After the ODenine session Jir "After surgeries...l thought I would never again have a good \. night's sleep. Thanks to Select Comfort, Patented I can now look forward to going to bed." Air Chamber —David D., Lucasville, OH Design! Why Back Pain Sufferers Sleep Better On Air! *7 have major back problems, and (i^^lT^^^sxrTTl have tried all types of mattresses, SELECT COMFORT* sleep systems Metal coil mattresses can including the most expensive comfortably contour to your body, create uncomfortable pressure . . ,P , . j. . properly support your back and points and provide uneven Waterbed. Select Comfort...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1997

■# x> *,:.• wEr JsM ■■ ■» lrf t : w«t— ** *•&& ■■ H atei^ Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Choice: Plus not evetyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? Best Value Now you can choose a plan which will give you the coverage you For Your Dollar: need... and will fit your budget. SQRIII We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. \ X J&^JSml x - Personal Service: With over 100 local Farm Bureau offices throughout Virginia, \ \ personalized service can be as close as your own community. 4>M» _ | _ ~ Health Care Coverage ft* 0 , oroaa Kange OI # j£ y QU are unc j er a g e 55 — f or Individuals or families |^B||| Coverage • If you are over age 65 — Medicare supplement • If you are a small business — coverage for 2-99 employe...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1997

Farm Bureau Volume 56, Number 2 Dairy producers see hope in price reform By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—Say cheese around dairy producers in Virginia, and you're likely to see a frown. That's because the wholesale price of cheese in Wisconsin affects the price milk producers receive in Virginia and across the nation. When the price of cheese drops, so does the price of milk leaving the dairy. Dairy producers sometimes complain that the price they receive for milk is unfair and that the pricing formula is too complicated. Wholesale milk prices haven't kept up with inflation. Labor costs continue to rise. Feed prices soared in 1996. This accounts partly for the continuing drop in the number of dairy farms in Virginia and across the nation. From 1995 to 1996, Virginia lost 55 dairy herds, finishing the year with 1,170 herds. The U.S. Department of Agriculture establishes a Basic Formula Price each month for its federal milk marketing orders. This is a program that esta...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1997

Farm Bureau News Vet school paving way for healthier livestock By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist BLACKSBURG—In a VirginiaMaryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine laboratory at Virginia Tech, Dr. Terry Swecker is studying how improved nutrition can ward off infectious diseases in cattle. And in the college's Center for Molecular Medicine and Infectious Diseases at the Price's Fork Research Center, bacteriologist Thomas Inzana has developed a promising new vaccine for swine pleuropneumonia, a huge problem for hog producers around the world. In the Shenandoah Valley, poultry houses are benefiting from avian veterinarian Bill Pierson's infectious disease research. These are just a few of the ways VMRCVM research programs are helping Virginia farmers improve their bottom line. The school's research may one day prove important to other Virginians as well. In the 20 years since ground was broken for the vet school, researchers have been conducting a variety of investiga...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1997

March 1997 Farm leaders to talk with members of Congress On March 19 —during National Agriculture Week—several hundred of Farm Bureau's most dedicated leaders will visit Virginia's II representatives and two senators in our nation's capital. A few weeks later our state Women's Committee will coordinate a similar pilgrimage to Washington. Our leaders' mission is to seek relief from a mind-boggling array of government regulations that are threatening the very livelihoods of each and every farmer in Virginia. The costs associated with regulations are buried in everything we raise, buy and sell. That's why we must encourage our elected national officials to curb these escalating federal regulations to protect property owners from regulatory actions and amend our tax structure so that fairness is provided to all citizens. Below is a rundown of some major issues that concern our county and state leaders. Some of these will be presented to Virginia's congressional delegation while in Washi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1997

Farm Bureau News Agriculture Week March 12—Virginia Food and Beverage Expo, ' I March 18—FIA luncheon to benefit Agriculture in the Classroom, Richmond March 18—FIA invites Henrico County fourth graders to tour a dairy farm in Powhatan County ■ March 22—Ag Day at the Science Museum, I Richmond 10 a.m.-4 p.m. General Assembly rules on agriculture issues (Continued from page 1) laws that unfairly restrict forestry practices. Lawmakers approved a measure introduced by Del. J. Paul Councill Jr., D-Franklin, to form a checkoff program for the state's cotton growers. If producers vote on a referendum in favor of an 85-cent assessment on each cotton bale sold in the Commonwealth, the governor will appoint a cotton board based on recommendations from growers. The board will administer checkoff funds for research, education and promotion of Virginia's fiber crop. "What this will essentially do for cotton producers is allow them to market their products collectively, which will hopefully prov...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1997

March 1997 .: It am Ih 'm \ | fjj B iwpipg^ Buy a new Dodge Thick and pick up a ton of cash. Up To $500 Cash Back To Farm Bureau Members. extra $300 to $500 in the deal. $500 cash back on '96 and '97 Ram Vans and As a member, you qualify for $300 back on Ram Wagons. That's on top of any other all new 1996 and 1997 5.9 L V-8 Magnum Ram national Dodge cash back offer* All you need EISOO pickups. to do is get a certificate from your state's Farm $500 back on '96 Bureau validating that you've been a member and '97 Ram for at least thirty days. Then stop by your 2500 and 3500 Dodge dealer. Where you'll discover it pays to pickups with a be in the Farm Bureau. 5.9LV-8, tThis cash back offer is valid for members of participating Farm Bureaus, is scheduled to expire 9/30/97, and is subject to change. Il may not be used in combination with any Cummins Diesel other Chrysler Corporation certificate program or certain other special programs. Ask for restrictions and details. Farm Bureau" is a r...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1997

Farm Bureau News Viewing Virginia IRS grants farmers reprieve on deferred payment contracts RICHMOND—The Internal Revenue Service has announced it will not enforce a ruling that would have taken away an important tax deferral practice for farmers...at least for now. The IRS ruling would have barred growers from using commodity contracts to defer taxes from one year to the next. For years farmers throughout the nation have used deferred payment contracts to average out their tax burden. "One year a farmer may have a great year with respect to crops or crop prices, which would push him into a higher tax bracket, but then the next year everything may go bust, so the taxable income can vary greatly from year to year," explained Tony Banks, assistant commodities director for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. Deferred payment contracts allow a producer to deliver his crop one year and get paid in the following, but the IRS ruled that the income should be taxed in the year the crop is s...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1997

March 1997 Pine timber prices rise in Virginia By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist Virginia forestland owners can quit pining for a better timber market—it's here. "The timber market is excellent in Virginia right now," said Thomas Graves Jr., an Orange County beef cattle producer who owns 500 acres of forestland. "I'm selling hardwood right now and prices are up," added Graves, who is a member of both the Virginia and American Farm Bureau forestry advisory committees. Graves said he is seeing increased prices for oak and poplar, and a regional forestry consulting firm reported prices are up for Southern pine timber as well. The upward trend in prices and demand is expected to continue, reported F&W Forestry Services Inc., which has an office in Charlottesville. The forestry consulting firm said the increase in prices and demand for Southern timber is due partly to restrictions on logging in the national forests of the West. Virginia State Forester James Garner...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1997

Farm Bureau News Inflation outpacing dairy prices nationwide (Continued from page 1) by March 31. The 1996 Farm Bill adopted by Congress requires the consolidation of the current 32 federal milk orders into 10 to 14 orders. This must be done by April 1999. Rules vary from order to order, and Congress wants more consistency in them. A Virginia member of the reform group is Wayne Pryor, a dairy producer in Goochland County. He is also a member of the Virginia Farm. Bureau Federation Board of Directors. He is chairman of the VFBF Dairy Advisory Committee and has a seat on the AFBF Dairy Advisory Committee. Cheese prices should not be tied in with milk prices, Pryor said. "Less milk is being produced and more is being consumed," he said, adding that most com- modities in that situation would bring more money to the pro- ducer. "Yet, the cheese market fell and brought down the price of milk. That's why they need to be separated. "So much milk is consumed in the Southeast," Pryor added. "...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1997

March 1997 Tidewater researchers save farmers money By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor SUFFOLK—How well does Texas cotton grow in Virginia? Does a nervous pig make better pork? What happens when pigs take vitamin A? These are a few of the questions researchers are trying to answer at the Tidewater Agricultural Research and Extension Center along Highway 58 in Suffolk. Established in 1914, the center is the largest of 12 research centers around the state, and each is a part of Virginia Tech. The Tidewater center has 32 full-time employees, including eight faculty members. It has 15 buildings, four greenhouses, a swine research unit and a farm with a 15-acre lake. The mission of the center is to develop and share information and technology to improve the productivity and profitability of Virginia agriculture. Researchers at TAREC focus mostly on cotton, peanuts, corn, soybeans, small grains and swine, said the center's director, Dr. Glen L. Heuberger. Scientists at TAREC are invol...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1997

Farm Bureau News Young Farmers hear regulatory concerns (Continued from page 9) inadvertently fail to comply with environmental law are met with fierce criminal prosecutions for any violations," he noted. Rawlins cited a case from Maryland's Eastern Shore in which a farm owner, Paul Tudor Jones 11, had to pay a $2 million fine because of a wetlands violation. Jones had hired Bill Ellen, a conservationist and environmental engineer, to build 10 duck ponds on Jones' farm. Ellen obtained 38 permits to build the ponds and hired two additional wetland experts to ensure that he did not fill any wetlands or do any damage to the environment. Unfortunately, a load of fill dirt was accidentally dumped near a wetlands site and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers accused Ellen of damaging wetlands and took him to criminal court. Ellen got a six-month sentence. Just to keep up with regulatory compliance, farmers are taking more and more time away from production aspects of their operations. Some la...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1997

March 1997 Videos bring agriculture issues to your TV screen During our recent Young Farmers' Conference, President Wayne Ashworth told us that our voice needs to be heard. He reminded us that we need to "help our organization stand firm for what is right, and to protect the agriculture industry." One way we can do that is by staying informed about what's going on in both Farm Bureau and agriculture. We now have videotapes to help us meet those challenges. "The County Connection," a video produced 10 times a year by Are you 65 or over? Do You Know Who Will Pay Your Medical Bills? Don't count on Medicare alone...it wasn't designed to pay all of your medical bills. And in 1996 Medicare deductibles and copayments that come out of your pocket are higher than ever. Many American's have found out too late...and are faced with medical bills that can total tens of thousands of dollars*...money they were saving for retirement. DONT LET HT HAPPEN TO YOU. Consider the Farm Bureau Medicare Supp...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1997

Farm Bureau News TIRE SALE Buy before April 1 10% REBATE ■ Farm bureau member only ■ Buy a pair of Farm Bureau rear farm tires ■ Get first tire at regular price, receive 10% discount off second tire ■ Offer for purchases in month of March, 1997 ■ Mail proof of purchase to VFBSC, Products Division to receive rebate check II Mail to: VFBSC, Products PO Box 27552 wSSiiSt Richmond VA 23261 ■ Coupon valid only for tires sold by Farm Bureau ■ Rebate applies to Fidelity, Firestone or Safemark long bar short bar Long Bar Long Bar Design Long Bar Short Bar Design 4-year field hazard warranty 4-year field hazard warranty Prices Prices 9.5-24 4 p1y....113.00 101.70 11.2-24 ...4 p1y...155.00 ...139.50 11.2-24....4 p1y....118.00 106.20 11.2-28 ...4 p1y...173.00 ...155.70 11.2-28....4 p1y....154.00 138.60 12.4-24 ...4 p1y...196.00 ...176.40 12.4-24....4 p1y....154.00 138.60 12.4-28 ...4 p1y...172.00 ...154.80 12.4-28....4 ply ....142.00 127.80 13.6-28 ...4 ply ...189.00 ...170.10 13.6-28....4 p1y...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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