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Elephind.com contains 17,476 items from Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong And Jeetho Shire Advocate, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Rare British Moth. ENTOMOLOGISTS AND THE THOMPSONI. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

Rare British Moth. + ENTOMOLOGISTS AND THE TlIOJtPSONI. This moth, which is a sinking example of the curiom colour variation common ami'iit insects, 1 irds, and animals, in a special ob ject of interest to entomologists, in view of the recent discovery of a. now and third variety by Mr. J. Thompson, a Chester entomologist. This form of the inscct appears at present to be confined to Dela mere Forest, Cheshire, and is very rare. It is named Thompson-!, ntlcr its discoverer, and is black, with a conspicuous white border to its 'wings. In its second variety the moth exhibits the first culminating stage of variation, and is black, with grey wing fringes, a change to a darker lino from tile common or ordinary type. The second variety, (f which wo al so give an illustration, is named V.obsoni, of Hartlepool. Neither ot these varieties, however, is an abrupt transit ion, for between the typical insect and each of them are var ious intermediate forms. From 'JHB THOME'SONI, THE 11A 1.1 K BRI...

Phases of the Moon. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

Phases ot the Moon. June-Fir-ii qivirirr J!mi. 12.8 a hi . ili iiiii"ii Sf.ii. !.!« |i m ; Inn qnarli" 'iili, It! U'l n " ; .!<.« m . m Hill, 1.33 m. .Inly-Fir i qi.r>'i Is'. 5 2t * in: nil in i"ii 7tli, I 1..V.I p in ; lut qnurn-i 15tb, 5.31 pm ; new m '"ii 23nl, 1'2 W p in ; lirst quarter 30th, 9.51 i til. August-Full mil»n 6tli, 10.10 n in; -il quarter lltli, 10.5U a in , new moon 21st, 10.26 p m ; first qnartei 28th, 2.52 p in. . September-Full ni'mii 5tli, 12 2 am; nut quarter lStli, 3.48 a m ; new ino'>n 20tli, 7-33 am ; first quaiter 2t!ih, 10.3 p m. October-Full moon tth, 3.58 p m ; lust quarter 12tli, 7.33 pin ; new union lOtli. 4.33 p m ; first quarter 2(it'i, 8.-It p in. November-Full mooa 3rd, 9.18 am; last quarter 11th, 9.36 a in : new moon IStli. 2.1 a in ; first quarter 21th, 11.38 p ni, December-First quarler 3rd, 4.20 a in ; last quarter l'Jtli, 9.31 p m ; new moon 17th, I2.'55j p ui ; first qnartcr 21tli, 6.21 p m. 1 Stephen, (J. V. 2 Winteis, .1. ...

Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

HOW TO NEUTRALISE DANQEUOUS STOMACH ACIDS. 1'Vit people heiides physicians rcnlUc llio importance of keeping the food contents of the st"mitch free from ncid fermentation. Healthy normal digestion cannot, take place while tlio delicato lining of the stomach is being ir>flaiiiod and distended by acid and wind-tlio results of fermenting fond in the st'Uinch. To srcuro perfect digestion, fermentation must be stopped o r prevented, and the acid neutralised. For this purpue physicians usually recommend getting a little bisurated magnesia from the chemist and taking half a teaspnonful in it little hot or c^ld wtter immediately after eating. They iccommond bisnrated magnesia because it is pleas ant to take, has no disagreeablo ufter effects, and instantly stops fermentation, neutralises the acid and makes the pour acid food bland, Brreut and easily digested. The regular use of bisurateu magnneiii -be sure you get the bisurated, as other kinds of magnesia nro of little v.tlue-is an absol...

The "Commercial" in an Indian Bazaar. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

The "Commercial" in an Indian Bazaar. J'opular conception of India is o[ necessity based on what illustrated papers dish up for us, and as they seein to prefer in the main some of the imposing buildings and streets in tho European quarters of Bom bay and Calcutta, varied occasion ally with views of the famous show places, such as tho Taj at Agra, or some notable Mosque or Tem ple, with which tlie country abounds, we naturally think of India on the samo broad lines as tht picturos visualiso for us. Hut this is not the real India ; to get to its heart you must leave lhe broad streets of European coiu morcc, and dive into its bazaars, where the teeming millions of na tives still live to-day exactly as they did hundreds of .years ago, and as they will, in all likelihood, be found hundreds of years hence, for the placid fatalism of Eastern tem perament abhors change and innova tion, and calmly defies all tho laws tif hygiene and sanitation by herd ing together in narrow, foetid by ways a...

SUNNY ROOMS MAKE SUNNY LIVES. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

SUNNY R.UOMS A1AICE tiUNNi LIVES. Let us take the airiest, choicest, am miniest room in the house for our lir tig room-the workshop where braij mil hotly ar« built up and renewed Vnd there tet us have a bay window 10 matter how plain in structure hroii^h which the Rood twin unwell . f nature-sunlight and pure air-cat recly enter. This window shall be the poem o' he house. It shall give freedom ant? cope for eye and mind. We shall nun; no picture on our walls that car omparo with the living and evurlast ug pictures which God shall paint foi is through our ample window. Hosj lawns, golden sunsets, tho tondei ?reen and changing tints of spring he glow of summer, the pomp of au .umn, tho white of winter, storm and ihinc, glimmer and gloom-all thes< »e can enjoy whilo we sit in our shel «rcd room as tho changing years rol! in. Dark rooms bring depression oi ipirits, imparting a sonee of confine nont, of isolation, of poworlessness. vhich is chilling to «n«rgy and vigour, >u...

THE ECONOMICAL PIG. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

THE ECONOMICAL PIG. The pig is the most economical of all animals. It has teen fo.ind in America that of what a horse eats ; 52 per cent, goes to waste, 4-1 per cent, of the food consumed by cattlo is similarly lost and 32 per cent of all tliat sheep take into their stom achs. But only 12 per cent, of what a pi^ eats is wasted. Of the food eaten by a pig 52 per cent, goes to make , crowth, while n xheev only (fi-u-iug, oi course, means Mc ' production of meat. These figures are obtained from rcent experiments made by Government experts, who find, as a result of their study, tint the pi<r Ins what thsy call 'Vco-o^ie superb,rit\" even over poultry. This means that it produces n-.or.' meat in proportion to its weight, ami the animal weighs more in proportion to the amount of food it consumes. It was found that Si per cent of the carcase of a pis is used as meit. 7"> per cent, of a bullock, and ">t per cent of a sheep. The pic seems to : have the advantage both ways. A...

CARE OF HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

OARE OF HEALTH. While there aro sometimes excep tional conditions under which it raa^ ic for* the general good that an indi ho.^a^p.uH ,AV.-7.~n...m."i...r>~~kT.\£.nr, mw of -beiuwolono© proecribc* quit* x different course for most of us. What ever weakens our vitality and vigoui makes us less useful in our work and in all our relations of lifo. If ex treme indulgence in any natural up petite does this on one hand, GO doea it* unnatural nnd excessive restraint on the other. If we consider the ap petite of hunger, for instance, we shall <eo the effect of gluttony on one hand, ind of starvation on the other. Nc ioubt it is often much more difficult lo preserve a duo moderation than to zo to either extreme. It requires deli* ;nt« discrimination to discover just vhat the body needs for its most per fect development, and a firmness o! nnrposo to supply those needs in the .ight proportions. Yet this is one ol ?l»e most important parts of that care »f health which enables us ...

When Walking is Hard Work. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

When Walking is Hard Work. People often express surprise Umt soldiers on the march cover only ten or twelve miles of ground Pcl* day. Kven then a pood many men fall out through fatigue, some faint, and the whole are completely done up at the end of the day. Hut the soldier is, nevertheless, a first-rate walker. H is all a mat ter of foot-tons of energy expond of}. TjlUC nn orflinnr.v laborer. ^ 300 tons lifted one foot high. An clevcn-stone itinn, "\vj\lklng seventeen miles on tho level, does the snmo amount of muscle work. But mark, if ho carries an overcoat weighing (ilb., ho does 311 foot tons. Now, the soldier is a regular pack-horse, and the kit that he car ries averages about 001b. in weight. So that ho does exactly as much work in a twelve-mile march as an ordinary man in his seventeen-mile walk. Besides, the soldier has to "break camp" before starting, and at the finish of the march he has to pitch camp, draw water, collect fuel, clean rifles, etc., not to speak of taking se...

TO TEMPT AN INVALID. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

TEMPT AN INVALID. Never leave the food by a patient'* ?tide from meal to meal. Serve everything as daintily a» pos »ible. See that all is scrupulously clean. 1 Never Rive large helpings. Don't ask what ho or she wouU i ike, but let the menu be a surprise. See all the necessaries for a meal j »re at hand. Don't koop the patient waiting while I »*ou run for knife or foik. I Aim at variety, perfection in conk- I ing, and each thing the beat of it- | kind. j .Wver forget that n tiny vase . i ilnwors or fernn brightens up t..- 1 t rav. Kxclude nil friends and well-mean ing disturbers during a meal, and Jirectly after. Kemember the great art of invalid feeding and rooking if; to prepare the foo<l in such a way that tho digestioii weakened by illness, is given the lenst possible work. For a poultice, add the white of an egg to a mustard plaster to prevent 01 minimise blistering. The wonderful deaf and Mind gir* vho graduated from ltadclifle College md who made an address at tho ...

The Ether of Space. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

The Ether of Space. Sir Oliver J.odpo delivered a lec ture at Bedford College, the other dny, on tlio "Ktlier of Space." IIo staled tlint "lie was not sura " about the ether being cohesive or not. Mr. Or. T. Rowley now writes :-"I would like to project the theory that ether beyoml the ." ._"r T'"' fnsmns atmosphere Bnsrs 01" H'I«V"V>"|- ' vKj.u.i'.v "or" «».v description to separate the parti cles of ether in the unfathomable space. Therefore it. must be pure, and, being pure, must essentially be cohesive. Not so where it abounds in our atmosphere, for the molecules of oxygen and hydrogen, together with the other gases, being con stantly changed by the climatic influences, interfere with the cohes ion of ether. It might be said c.f the inexplicable nature of radium, that it is a substance which dis agrees with the particles of ether coming into contact with its sur face, and throws them of! again, making the undulations apparent to the eye. K is worthy of experi ment u'itli a qua...

THE DAIRY HINTS ON BUTTER AND CHEESE-MAKING. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

THE DAIRY + HINTS ON BUTTER AND Cl-IEJSS MAKINCI. Unless the cliurn is kept well venti lated, especially during the early part of the chinning period, the cream will become frothy through being charged with gas liberated from the cream. Unless the churning is carrietl out satisfaetoi i'y the qua lity of the butter is bourn! to suffer. It should take from 20 to 3.i minutes for the cream to turn to butter in the churn. Acidity in milk assists the action of rennet, resulting in a rather lirm curd. In making soft and other kinds of cheese where a soft, ten ler curd is required, acid milk cannot be em ployed. In some varieties of cheese the presence of acid, so long as the milk is not too sour, does not have a serious effect upon the resulting cheese. In the production of cream ehec«e, it is important to use er.ly pure fresh cronm, jirul to make the checse being kept too long while the checsc is being made. Double cream cheese is made from thick rich cream that is drained quickly, then p...

CHAPTER IV. THIS WOOING OF SABINA. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

CHAPTER IV. THIS WOOING OF SAB1NA. Pairv Queen ?" The speaker was a fair, nristocra tic-Iooking girl, with a face that spoke of suffering in spite of her youth. | "No, hut wo soon became great friends," replied Josh, letting her in fer that he had been one of the first class passengers. "Then after the shipwreck we were together in the boat until we were picked up," he added, looking round the drawing room and thinking that in spite of its shablrines.s it was a grand old house ; but as Miss Ossington spoke, his eyes became lix(Hl on her, and he j reflected that if she was not exactly | beautiful, she had a high-bred air, and looked what she was-an aristo crat to the tips of her fingers. "Did lie tell yon anything about | liis nephew Donald, who died in Mel | bourne ?" she asked ; and Josh saw j that her face had become paler, and tears stood in her eyes, and it dawn ed on him that she had loved the un fortunate young man. "Yes, he spoke of him frequently. I believe his deatli had be...

THE FARM AND DAIRY. THK JERSEY-SHORTHORN CROSS [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

THE FARM A8D DAIRY. THK JERSEY-SHORTHORN' CROSS A writer in tin "Mnrlc jjBr Pr*<s Asricnituml Journal" "t. j mis breed in Australia, is still an j undefinable proposition in En-land, , and it is only within the Inst few ? i.t Bssai","e matter irhothcr it was a male or fe male, t,y crossing the Jersev with the Shorthorn tjpe. Thev found that the Shorthorn history is, without d iubt. an interesting one. biit.it only affects this article in regnrd to its milfcin^ finalities. Hers apain we cannot do better ^nan quote snmi ol the remir&s in Mr. O'CaUar-jrin's ' book on the breed : "While I must confess the Shorthorn breed, , as represented by animals in Coates' 'Herd Book,' pos sesses some excellent specimens of daily cows, vet on the other hand, when we ask these first-class indivi duals to reprodure their type they fail too frequently. Cv this X mean ?that if we mate two good deep milk ing: pure-bred Shorthorn cows with a hull, descended on both sides'from Coates' 'H...

THE POULTRY FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

THE POULTRY FARM. + Feed early in winter. Crushed maize can be fed in winter. I Cleanliness must be observed in the fowlhnuse. I Straw from the stable makes good | scratching* material for fowls. I ont.for roup. Tho first nymp |eyes. i In the scratching shert bury the I -grain in the litter, so as to make the ? birds work for it. I To encourag". eg>; production in | winter, it is best to keep your fowls in dry, warm scratching sheds. | To kill worms in fowls, give fowls i pills of thymol, consisting of one j grain of thymol mixed in a soft ' bread pellet. For cramp in fowls' dogs, it is best ! to gently rub tho limbs with eucal ! yptus oil, and keep the birds in a j dry, warm shed. | The egg is the most nutritious of 1 foods. It contains 10 per cent, of car j bohyd rates, 12 per cent, of albumi I noids, :! per cent, of salts, and 75 j per cent, of water. | Five turkey linns are eijual to a i hundred-egg incubator in the hatch ] ing season. They can be set for nine I weeks, and th...

CHINESE HUMOUR. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

CHINESE HUMOUR. '' otnc persons Chinam?n anil Ar i iii Indians stand as represen l 01 humourless peoples. As u .-r of fact, each race amuses i i its own way. but that v. . -pens to be different from .« v* to which most of the v. accustomed. One of the Is residing in China i w er for "Harper's Week \\ ry which shows the grim i -T of the Chinese humour. . - il 1,i(I arrested nine de lii< >t<, intending to turn them o' . r to the mercies of (he native ir. rte the next morning. Mean t .. of a t Li policeman, and ! h m to I* » tie m up, all hough ' was no g«.ol at the Consu 1 i-.«. T e policemen was ».= .i;tI to the < m r ency. He >olem iy s.'lutedv k yin.-. "I obey !" and m.irchcd his men off. Soon he returned, and an nounced that they were safely caged. The Consul was curious to see how and where. He followed his policeman to the yard. There ho saw the nine prisoners dancing round the Consulate flagstaff, lugubriously chanting the Chinese equivale...

THE FIRST PAINLESS EXTRACTION. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

THE FIRST PAINLESS EXTRACTION. Horace Wells, a dentist, of Ilart Iord, Connecticut, F.S.A., is gener ally credited with the first use of "laughing gas" as an anaesthetic. Suffering himself from toothache, and dreading the pain of extraction, he induced a fellow-dentist named Kigg to administer nitrous-oxide ami draw the tormenting itu)lar. Satisfied with tlie result oi the ex periment, Wells entered into part nership ivifli W. T. llreen Morton and started demonstrating the new system. But it was a rank failure. They were both derided as impos tors, Wells feeling the public preju dice so keenly that he went out of his mind, and died insane. Morton, however, continued prac tice, and after making; n number of experiments with ether on animals, callers), he inhaled a certain quan tity, and only awoke from com plete unconsciousness to hear his surgery hell ringing violently. lie went to the door ami found a patient (Mr. Frost) with a rag ing tooth, but without, courage to have it drawn. ...

A MISTAKE IN THE SCRIMMAGE [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

A MISTAKE IN THE SCIMMMACiE During the visit of the Maori foot ball players to Kngland some years iiro Un»y octpnretl a ro;mt:\lion for ed with n certain (oam thi.s- f*\\ tore so clovc.'Iope#! itsejf that, before the panic was many minutes old, throe of the home team were hors do combat. Finding that expostulation was useless, the British blood asserted itxelf. anrl retaliation was indulged in. While a ftTce-Iooking sp'i Mi ntage was in progress the loud, voire of the captain of the home team was heard as he thus rebuked n comrade : "Confound it, Tom, do look out ! It was the ball you kicked that time !" j)ufT-So you nnd the Faton girl are one ? Houston-That's what I thought when the parson murried us, but I have since concluded we are ten. DulT-What do you mean ? Houston-She is one nnd I'm nought, my dear iellou*. Fur . t i:v. j'i:,&c\ -tored and krpt ipsurtNi ii '3».;: >.-P. Fara S;:vri, Drouiu. . . c r:i«>ni«, new stock at P. Fara Tt-niin, at toTrn price®, freight p...

DROUIN MARKET. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

DUOUIN MARKET. Geo. V. Stephen reports having held his weekly sale at the Drouin yards on Tuesday, when there wa» only a small yarding of pigs, which sold at a large advanco 011 last week's prices. An average yarding of cattle, all of which wore sold at the ; late high rates. During the week I sold a lino of fat bullocks oil account of MrG. Notman, : also one very fine Jersey heifer 011 : account of Mr T. Wilkinson at a high figure.

Molasses in Sheep Feeding. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Independent, Buln Buln, Warragul, Berwick, Poowong and Jeetho Shire Advocate — 26 June 1914

Molasses in Sheep Feeding. " We have a lino of 300 four, six ' and eight tooth crossbr.'d and come back ewes," n Scott's Crook corres pondent writes, "due to 1<iml) the soeond week in July. Our supply of grass is short, but we have plenty of hay, and are starting to cut it up into chaff. We have boon advised to use molasses with it. and would bo glad if you would advise us as to the pro portion of molasses to use, also weight of chaff per sheep." There is no doubt that molasses has a special use, mixing with dry chulT and similar fodders, because animals maintained on dry fodder that has been damped down with diluted molasses are not likely to suffer from impaction and pimilar in ternal troubles. From the analysis it is found that molasses is chiefly valuable in fattening, in which re spect it nearly approaches maize. Lovr in protein content, it doos not in itself promise so highly as a milk making foddor, although its capacity j for rendering unpalatable food attrac tive...

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