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Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Reco... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,315 items from Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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[?]R HENRY KEPPEL. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

I B HENBY KEPPEL. The harbour of Singapore — or rather, the sheltered passage behind Brani Island — baB hitherto borne the name of New Harbour, In honour of Sir Henry it is to be called Keppel Harbour, and tbe gallant old man, now in his ninety-second vear. appreciates the honour immensely. To see him in a tig cane ohair — his head scarcely shewing above the cuBhioto — looking a mere whisp of humanity in his thin tussore silk suit, one would not gueas what a terror his name and fame has been to wrong-doers from Sarawak to Chittagong. A very pathetic wish of his came to our knowledge recently. Sir Henry has a otbo*. desire to die at sea, and now that tho death of his second wife and the mar riage of both his children has broken the home ties he so dearly prized, he goes away constantly on long voyages, quite happy and cheery, but hoping that when tbe grim jneBEongGr comos to aim his ears may be filled with the sound of waves, And the bright blue water may close over all is mortal of ...

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Varieties. ROYAL FETISHES. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

Varieties. ? ROYAL FETISHES. ?^JJPJjMONG the Bonapartes the house hold fetishes are the boots and the title of Napoleon — that monarch who worked harder than any dozen men in his empire. In Prussia they preserve piously the breeches of grey leather which were worn by the Hohentollern dynasty. They preserve with equal reverence the cane which Frederick the Great carried in his battles; that same cane he had in Mb hand when he died in bis armchair, refusing with characteristic fores and obstinacy to die in hiB bed. The Russian court still guards, sb if they were saintly relics, the carpenter's tools which were once used by Peter the Great

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE BANANA. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

THE BANANA. The banana waB named musa after Antonius Musa. the freedman and phy sician of tbe great Augustus of the Romans, says Linn&eua. Tae eapientum — the wisenesB — in its name is a graceful tribute to it as the ' wise man's food,' for lnoreaible as it may seem, it) is pernaps the best food product on the earth, being far more productive than either wheat or potatoes — the Btaple food of other nations. Long ago it was calculated that it is 133 times as productive as wheat, and 44 times as productive as the potato; in other words, that the ground that would give 33 pounds of wheat or 90 pounds of potatoes would, as far as mere space is oonceraed, give 4.000 pounds of bananas, and with a fractional amount of the same trouble. It has been called the * Prince or tne iropios, necausa ic uuloo place, only to an even greater degree, in these hot countries, that wheat, rye, aud barley take in West Asia and Europe,, and that rice takes in India and China. British charities have ...

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PICTURES FOR THE BLIND. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

PICTURES FOR THE BLIND. One of the latest and most ingenious inventions for the instruction and delight of the blind is a moving picture ap paratus which has just been constructed by a young French scientist, M. F. Dus sant. In the machine the pictures are shown by imares in relie1 and are apprehended, tirth Kir fha avo hut. hv fnnftll. Through this device it has been made possible to give to the blind an idea of the motion and displacement of objects, in which the images of relief take the place of photographs. These reliefs, passing more or less swiftly under their fiagers, enable them to follow with interest and at the same time with profit for their intellectual de velopment the flight of a bird, the motion of the stars in the sky, and the galioping of a horse, a train of cars in motion etc,

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN OPEN-AIR NAP. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

AN 0PEN-AIB NAP. Does baby take his nap in the open air P If not, then he iB missing the best, tonic that nature oan give him. At least, that is the popular theory at present, and it is baing ' put into practice by leading physicians. , xb id i.xiu uhu&i practice LU cuuuiu babies by keeping them in warm rooms, safely protected from any -vhiff of out door air. But now we are told that all this is wrong, that the baby should be well wrapped and put in his carriage out of doors for his nap. Babies that have been for some time subjected to this treatment find it diffi cult to sleep well in the house ; and one physician, whose own baby has daily outdoor naps, says ' there's nothing like pure, fresh air, and babies ne-d it more than grown people.'

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FASHIONABLE COIFFURES. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

FASHIONABLE COIFFURES. Even dress, potent factor as it is in beautifying, has not the eame degree of power over the personal appsa'ince as can be claimed by tho coiffaie If the h-iir is dragged t»wav from the temples and the face robbed of its natural fram°, the most finely formed features will bave ' 'XT' la group- stetch are re presented one or two coiffures for the moment, m each of which, it will be seen, ^tnh6ir waved — either by \e,rW\6e' Altb°aeb coiffures !°w, the hair is still tolerably high on the head in «n^ I68' bnt the » dis °n ,th.6 The centre sketch ^0e 3'?e hair parted in the centre and dressed in the form of the figure 8. liw '''' ' nape ot the neck, while the pretty and fashionable Bide-parting is suggested in another sketch. This iB a favourite style of the moment and suits many women, especially those with oval brows, admirably. The hair is combed softly away from the forehead and fluffed ontbroad at the eidee. The girlish bead mtbeproup is dressed with tte modis...

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A CELEBRATED DUELLIST. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

A CELEBRATED DUELLIST. Tho late Lord Camelford, of duelling notoriety, entering one evening a coffee house in Conduit Srreet, meanly attired, as was Mb t ell oral custom, sat down to rca.d the papers of the day. A dashing fellow, a first-rate blood, entered Eoon afterwards, and threw himself on the opposite seat of the same box, and, in a nonsequental tone, bawled out, ' Waiter ! Bring mo a pint of Madiera and a couple oi wax candles, and put them into the next box.' He t' en drew to himself Lird Came't'ord's caudles, and set himself to read. His lordship then glanced a look of indignation, but. continued to decipher his paper. Tho waiter soon reappeared, and announced his having completed the the gentleman's commands, who immedi ately lounged round into his own box. Lord Camelford, having finished his paragraph, called out in a mimi: tone, ' Waiter I Bring mo a pair of snuffers.' These were quickly brought, when his lordship laid down the paper, walked round to the box in which the...

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WASHING DRESSES. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

WASHING DRESSES. . printed lawns are among the dainty washing materials tbat are dresay lookjHg and inexpensive, and are appear g in a medley of pretty colours and with pa,.torn suggested of foulard, hw ?? are produced in dark blue spotted with white; others show a degsL^°^ld' !°Ch„fA ^ or P?l* blue, ttanan T ^ ™rth mo« a P*f mg menhon, tte most original The! Bh? m00^16^ witu white. sWrt m, be.ma£e UP w the coat and yB[r te th® Et?atnest of the material being better suited to a coat than a blouse. If a hoUand.nnlnmaj .. needed nothing better can be c^oson ttan tusBore of the cheaper kind which is aow to^be had m less yellow shades thin of Any child over 7 can be prosecuted as a criminal in England, but in Germany 18 is the limit of responsibility.

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Personalities. TOLSTOI. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

Personalities, TOLSTOI. KN autumn it is Count Tolstoi's nrau Q|b tice to live alone upon his estate, '& attended only by his secretary, as he ministers to bis simple wants with bis o n n hands. He lives in two rooms of the house and enjoys the undisturbel quiet for work, but not quiet undis turbed, for lo, inquisitive mice visit him in multitudes, so that eight traps had to | be set tor tnese little creatures. i When the lids of these traps shut down, : then Tr. lstoi knew that one was caught, i Now, he and his secretary took it in I turns to take the mice out of the traps, I So when a sha-p noise denoted another mouse caught in one of these traj-s, ' There is another,' said Count Tolstoi ; I ' whose turn is it to take out our little friend P' ' Yours, Count,' said the busy secretary. Count Tolstoi then, interrupting his work, goes to the corner, and taking the iipp with the little mouse inside goeB into the wood close by and lets it loose. The n- xt time the secretary doeB ...

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SOCIETY. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

SOCIETY. Transatlantic Society has lately been | devoting itself to . costume parties, each j one introducing more or less novel or startling features, but all former effoits in this line have now been eclipsed by the 'Baby Party' just given ft Washington by Mr. and Mrs. William Scholl. The h- cteEB received he; guests attired in an embroidered cambric robe fastened by a pink sash, from which dangled au in fant's rattle, while on her head was a lace cap tied under the chin in orthodox infantile fashion. Many the most dignified men in Society, members of the diplomatic service, and naval and military p3icers joined in the romps dressed as girl babies or tiny tots, one Little Lord Fauntleroy over six feet high being specially remarkable. There was baby talk and baby walk galore, and all kinds of infantile amuse ments. Tne tavours lor me mevitaoie cotillon consisted of nursing bottles, teething rings, gold safety pins, bebs brooches and banglfs. and many other artioles to be found in e...

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
'JIM, THE PENMAN.' [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

'JIM, THE PENMAN.' James Townsnnd Saward, better known ns ' Jim, the Penman,' was a man of good birth, a barriBler-at-law, who might have done well at the Bar had he not drifted into dissolute ways. He was a man of low tastes, an inveterate gambler, a drunkard, and a debauche. To provide funds for his excesses ho took to crime, utilising his extraordinary skill in coun terfeiting handwriting. Forgery with him was a business planned on a wide oasis, ana carried en witn extraorumary skill ; he was soon known in the criminal world as a certain purchaser of stolon cheques, blank or cancelled, and all bills of exchange. These became his stock in trade. He filled up blanks with the signatures that came into his hands, whiift he used much ingenuity in obtain mtj, ueuu biguaouioB wuou j.c4^*hou. xv was a common practice with him to com mence snam actions and address formal applications to individuals meiely for the signature he obtained in reply. When at last he was found out, a hue-and-cry...

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SENSE OF HUMOUR. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

SENSE OP HUMOUS. A well-known golfer recently told a good story in an after-dinner speech. A belated wayfarer was passing a public- j house late at night when a foreigner was ejected therefrom who bore iill tho Eisns ! of extremely rough usave, but neverthe- J less waB laughing immoderately. ' What is the joke P' the gentleman asked. ' Why,' said the other, ' a man came up to me in the bar just now, pave me a fearful punch on the nose, and said, ' Take that, yo i blooming Noiwegian,' ' and he fell to laughing again. ? But,' the gentleman said, 'there's nothing very funny in tbat.' *No,' tho men answered, ' but then he hit me a crack in the eyep, and afterwards knocked out my teeth, Baying, 1 And take that tou, you blooming Norwegian.' * 'But still I can't see anything funny.' ? Eo ! Ho ! Ho !' the other yelled. 'The joke is that I'm a Swede.'

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EVIDENCE [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

EVIDENCE Scene — A Police Court. — Constable : ? And tbe prisoner said, ver honour, as how somebody had blown the gaff.' His Honour -. '* What doe9 that mean P' Constable : ' Wfcy. given him away, yer honour.' His Honour : ' And what may that mean ?' Constable : 1 Why, rounded on him, sir.' His Honour : ' I am etill ignorant of your meaning, my man.' Constable : 1 Wby, yer honour, he meant as how somebody had peached ou him - squealed, your honour.' And it was not until the' innocent magistrate was told that someone had turned Q teen's evidence that he had the smallest idea what the constable m-ant.

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SHORT OF HOT WATER. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

SHORT OF HOT WATER, Miss Flora Shaw, a correspondent of the ' London Times,® was once travelling through Africa in a bullock waggon. The sun was blazing, the bullocks were slow, tbe duBt was indescribable. She was making for a frontier town, where she anticipated the comforts cf a bath. At the entrance to the place, Miss Shaw, dead beat, dusty and irritable, found her self confronted with, the oraeat or a puoiic reception. The officials read her a wel come ; she was as civil as she could be ; then she bolted for the hotel. She gave but one order, ' Hot water, quick 1' _ She sat on the edge of the bed and waited. Some minutes passed. At last a Diaou: servant entered with a tin vessel, in which theri was something steaming. Seizing it. Miss Shaw poured out a milky, odoriferous liquid. She turned to the servant for an explanation. The hotel was very Bhort of water ; - as a distin guished guest, a point had bsen stretched for her. They had sent her the water in which ihe fish had just b...

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TRIPLETS. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

TBIPLETS. ' I was called,' said a physician, ' to attend triplets. The three youngsters, a few weeks old, lay side by side in a crib, and it was a physical impossibility to tell one from the otber. Each had a different ailment. The mother knew thit one had a cough, but did not know which it was. Mother and doctor waited for a cough before deciding to which one ot the trio it belonged. - ft a: jc — fiwAa/ifiVknA for each, and the anxious mother was per- I plexed to know how she should avoid giving the wrong medicine to the wrong child. The doctor cams to the rescue by placing a piece of red flannel around the neck of one bottle and a strip of similar material around the arm of the child to whom it was to bs given. White linen and a piece of green cloth were 'used respectively for the other two.'

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOTE THE MIDDLE FINGER. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

NOTE THE MIDDLE FIN GEE. One of the moBt peculiar members of the Lemur tribe is the aye-aye of Mada gascar. In form it resembles a squirrel, in size it iB equal to a large cat. and it is very shy, stealthy, and ' ghost-like ' in its movements. Its most remarkable pecu liarity consists in the middle finger of its hands, which is extremely thin and spider like. The aye-aye passesses extraordinary acutenuss of hearing, and apparently can locate, by the sounds they make in the trunks of trees, the wood-boring larvra on which tt feeds. Chiselling away the wood with ife teeth, the aye-aye inserts its re WIMlrnWn middle finger to fork out its I victims.

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PRINCE EDWARD'S FROG. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 22 August 1902

PBINCE EDWARD'S FBOG. Prince Edward of York, the little- j grandson of Edward VII., was recently attacked with influenza, and, being a sturdy lad, he complained bitterly be cause He was obliged to remain in bed. His nurse gave him all the good counsel suitable on such an occasion, but he paid little heed to her until Bhe happened to say that there was a little girl living near the place who was also .suffering from influenza, but who bore the affliction like an angel. ? I'd like to know that girl,' said the prince, enthusiastically, ' and at any rate I'm going to Bond her a present. What shall I send P I have been taught that princes when they give presents should eive those things which they prize the . . vr ? ii- - .l : ? u:„i. t 4-i.« most, ixuvy tuo LUUl^ wmuu x JIL1UD iw most are my bust of Lord Boberts and my frog, my beautiful green frog, which jumps to well.' Over this problem he pondered for some minutes, and then he said : *1 like Lord lloborts vory much, but [ like my fro...

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
VALUE OF MUSHROOMS. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 29 August 1902

{*** VALUE OF MUSHROOMS. Time was when it was believed that the mushroom presented the composition of animal flesh, which led to it being called ?animal beefsteak.' This conclusion, London 'Lanoef says, was based on an analysis made many years ago, when analytical methods were crude, and when the chemistry of food wai not well under stood. The most important difference Between cne musnroom ana tne steak is due to the rich proportion of pr jteids— the so-called flesh-formers — in meat, aa compared with the feeble amount in' the mushroom. This fact, as ascertained by recent analysis, hardly justifies the mush room being regarded as a 'vegetable beefsteak.' It may be a blow to the vege tarian, but he would have to consume at least ten pounds of mushrooms in order lj gain we equivalent ot a little over one puund ef prime beef. Indeed, in the light of modern inquiry there seems to be no reason for believing that mashr-.cms possess any greater food value than other ordinary fresh vegetabl...

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HABITS OF THE WILD CAT. [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 29 August 1902

HABITS OP THE WILD CAT. To say that the dog can 'whip hie weight in wild-oata' is to pay at-out the highest tribute to his strbngth, courage and activity, and there are very few dogs that would care to earn bucU a tribute if they understood all it implied. Not that a wild-cat is of a specially a£Sress:ve dis position; on the contrary, he wLuld sooner mind his own business any time than fight. So anxious is he, &b a rule, to Keep out of trouble that ho has often been accused of cowardice ; but he has on so many occasions given evidence of the m ist desperate courage that it is doubtful if the accusation ie a fair one. When wounded or at bay he is perhaps as dan ger, us as any creature of hie size.

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO CLEAN A WHITE STRAW HAT [Newspaper Article] — Canowindra Star and Woodstock Recorder — 29 August 1902

TO CLEAN A WHITE STRAW HAT uia ana airty wmce straw hats may be made to look new by the ueg of lemon-juico and flower of tulphur. Pat a little of the sulphur in a saucer; tqueeze ensugh lemon-juice on to well moisten it, and after brushing the hat, scrub well with the mixture, using a moderately stiff,, na^l-brush. Rinse in cold water, scffifu'' bin* till all the su'.pKur is W^TZ^' shape. X:-^?^'1 '° keeP lfc ln tke proper

Publication Title: Canowindra Star And Woodstock Recorder
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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