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Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,862 items from Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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The Indomitable Scot. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

The Indomitable Scot. A West Country Scot, who hnd engaged in the manufacture of a cortain description of goods then recently introduced into that part of tho country, i .found it - necessary, or conjectured it might bo profit able, to establish a permanent con nection with somo respectable house! iu London. With this design he packed up a quantity of goods, equipped himself for tho journey, and departed. Upon his arrival ho mado diligent inquiry as to those who were likely to prove his beat customers, nnd accordingly proceed ed to cull upon one of tho most opulent drapers, with whom he re solved to establish a regular cor respondence. When Saunders enter ed tho shop in question ha found it crowded with j customers, and the salesman all bustling about mak ing sales, and displaying their wares to prospective purchasers. Saunders waited what ho consider' ed a» reasonable timo; then in a lull of business laid down his pads, his bonnet, and stafl upon tho counter, and inquired for "tho ...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PEN PICTURES OF THE PAST. TRIAL OF THE DORSETSHIRE LAUORERS. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

PEN PICTURES OF THE PAST. TRIAL OK THE DORSETSHIRE LAUORERS. Tho first important epoch in tho history of modern Ilritish labour politico was tho formation, in 1834, of the Grnnd National Consolidated Trades Union, a really important association, numbering as it did half a million adherents, who represented every branch of labour, including agriculture. Even Women's unions were affiliated. Tho - tremendous possibilities of such a united body of workers naturally aroused tho attention of the governing classes, and a. prosecution was instituted for "unlawful conspiracy," of which tho most salient incident is that of the Dorchester labourers. At. this period, when tho average wage of tho English farmhand was 10s. a week, tho Dorset laborers re ceived 7s. Half a dozen of such men, Methodists and 'local preachers, started n "Grand Lodge of tho Na tional "Friendly Society of Agri cultural Labourers'' nt ToJpnddlo (Dorsetshire). Soma farmers insti tuted a prosecution for "conspl racy." Tho ...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Quite Correct. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

Quite Correct. He was one of those . inquisitive. Loquacious strangers who, not con tent with telling you of all their cloitigs and achievements, insist on learning nil your secrets. And poor Jones found himself alone with the man in the com partment of a railway train which ran without tv stop from Crewe to London. Having asked countless quostions concerning his fellow-traveller's busi ness and the object of his journey, the stranger began to make inquiry about his family. " Well, if you really want to krttow," said the exasperated Jo HOB, "I'll tell you. I have a -Avifo and five children,' but I've never seen one of them." "Never seen one of them ?" began the stranger. "But-but " "I tell you I've never seen one of them," ropeatod Jones. "I've been away from home for u week, and my youngest kiddie was born yes terday." A mau rang the bell at Willie Budd's house one day, and Willie, aged eight, ansv/erod it. " Is Mr. Budd in ?" said the man. "I'm Mr. Budd," said Willie, "or do you w...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Rare British Moth. ENTOMOLOGISTS AND THE THOMPSONI. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

Rare British Moth. ENTOMOLOGISTS AND THE THOMPSONI. This moth, which is a striking example of the curious colour vuriation common among insects, lirds, and animals, is r spccial ob ject of interest to entomologists, in view of tho recent discovery of a. new mid third variety by Mr. J. Thompson, a Chester entomologist. This form of tho insect appears at present to bo confined to Dela more Vorest, Cheshire, and is very raro. It is named Thompsoni, after its discoverer, and is black, with a conspicuous white border to its wings. In its second variety the moth exhibits the first culminating stage of variation, and is black, with grey wing fringes, a chnngo to a darker huo from the common or ordinary type. The second variety, if which wo al so give an illustration, is named Kobsoni, of Hartlepool. Neither of these varieties, however, is an abrupt transition, for between the typical insect and each of them are var ious intermediate forms. From 1 HE THOltPSONI, THE HA UK BRITISH MOTH WHICH...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FARM AND DAIRY. THE JERSEY-SHORTHORN CROSS [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

THE FARM AND DAIRY. THE JicnSEY-SHOnTHORN CROSS A writer in the "Mark Lane Ex* press Agricultural Journal" fl'rongiy advocates the crossing of the Short horn with the Jersey, as he considers it one of the most generally useful class of cattle for the dairyman, es pecially. occupiers of small farms whereT-lje dairy, in one phase or an other, is a retail business of prim ary importance. The presumption is that he had in view what is called a dual purpose breed. History, how ever, has shown that this cross has not been such a success as would warrant to give it n further trial, j Heading through the pleas, the. | writer puts in favour of his ccnten'-. , tion, it is evident that he has not I studied the history of the two breeds ? sufficiently. The milking Shorthorn,, as we know this breed in Australia, Js still an undefinablo proposition in Kn^liand, and it is only within the last few jy.enrs that efforts have been mndc to jbrlng out the best qualities or that animal'from a dairying -p...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE POULTRY FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

THE POULTRY FARM. Feed early in winter. Crushod raaizo can be fed in winter. Cleanliness must be .observed in the; , fowlhouse. ' - - Straw from the stable makes, good scratching matorfal for fowls. . Look out fpr roup. The first symp-V torn is; iV watery appearance in tho eyes. ' ''-'-I In tbe scratching shed bury the grain in the litter, so as to make *ho birds work for it. ' To encourage ogg . production in winter, it is best.to'keep your fowls in dry, warm scratching sheds. I To kill worms in fowls,' give fowls pills of thymol, consisting of one grain of thymol mixed in a soft bread pellet. 1 For.cramp in fowls'tlegs, it ia host to gently rub tho limbs with eucal- i yptus oil, and keep the birds in a I dry, warm shed. The ogg is the most nutritious of" loods. It contains 10 per cent, of car bohydrates, 12 per cent, of albumi noids, 3 per cent, of salts, and 75 . per cent, of water. j Five turkey hens are .equal to a ' hundred-egg incubator in the hatch ing season. Tbey can be se...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE DAIRY HINTS ON BUTTER AND CHEESEMAKING. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

THE DAIRY + HINTS ON.BUTTER AND CHEESE MAKING. Unless fehe chum is kept well venti lated, ©specially during the early j part of the churning period, the ' cream will become frothy through I being charged with gas liberated! from the cream. Unless the churning I is carried out satisfactorily the qua lity of the buttor is bound to suffer. It should take from 20 to 35 minuses for the cream to turn-to butter in the churn. Acidity in milk assists the action^ of rennet, resulting in a rather firm, curd. In making soft and other kinds : of cheese where a soft, tender curd is.' required, acid milk cannot be em-' ployed. In some varieties of cheese ' the presence of acid* so long as the milk is not too sour, does not have a serious effect upon the resulting cheese. . In the production of cream cheese, , it is important to use only pure freBh cream, "and to make ttie cheese in as short a time as possible. In many, cases the flavour of. cream cheese is at fault through the cream being kept too...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
When Walking is Hard Work. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

When Walking is Hard Work. People often- express surprise that soldiers on the inarch covcr only ten. or twelvo 'miles of ground per day. Even then a good many men fall out through fatigue, some faint, and the whole are completely done up at tho cud of the day. But the soldier is, nevertheless, a ^first-rate walker. It is all a mat ter of foot-tons of energy expend ed. Take an ordinary laboror, and his day's work will bo equal to <500 tons lilted one foot high. *\n eleven-stone man, walking seventeen miles on the level, doos tho same amount of muscle work. But mark, if he carries an ovorcoat weighing Gib., ho does ail foot tons. Now, the Holdier is a regular pack-horso, and the kit that ho car ries averages about 60lb. in weight. So that he docs exactly as much work in a twelve-mile marcn us ordinary man in his sevonteon-mile walk. Upsides, the soldier has to "break camp" before starting, ond at tho finish of tho march he has to pitch camp, draw wator, collect fuel, clean...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Ether of Space. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

The Ether of Space. -Sir Oliver Lodge delivered a lec ture at Bedford College, the other day,, on the "Ether of Space." Ho stated that "he was not sure" about the other being cohesivo or not. Mr. G. T. Kowley now writes :-r-"I would like to project the.--theory that ether beyond the bouridfiry of our gaseous atmosphere can be. no other than cohesive, bo cause: it is certain that there are no gases' or dust, or vapour, of any description to separate the parti cles of ether in the unfathomable space. Therefore it must be pure, and, being pure, must essentially be cohesive. Not so where it abounds in our atmosphere, for the molecules of oxygon and hydrogen, together with the other gases, being con stantly changed by tho climatic influences, interfere with the cohes ion of ether. Jt might be said of the inexplicable nature of radium, that it is a substance which dis agrees with the particles of ether coming into contact with its sur face; and throws them off again, making the undulation...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The "Commercial" in an Indian Bazaar. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

The "Commercial" in an j Indian Bazaar.. I'opUlar conception of India is of necessity based ou what illustrated papers dish up for us, and as they seem to "prefer in tho main some of the imposing building?) and streets in the Ktiropean quarters of Bom hay and Calcutta, varied occasion ally with views of the famous show places, such as tho Taj at Agra, or some notable Mosque or Tem ple, with which tho country abounds, we naturally think of India on the same broad lines as the picturos visualise for us. Hut this is not the real India ; to get to its heart you must leave the broad streets of European com* Uncrce, 'anil dive into its bazaars, where the teeming millions of na tives still 'live to-day exactly as they did hundreds of years ago, and as they will, in all likelihood, be found hundreds of years hence, (or the. placid fatalism of Kastern tem perament abhors change and innova tion, and calmly defies all the laws of hygiene and sanitation by herd mg together in narrow, foetid by ...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE ECONOMICAL PIG. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

THE ECONOMICAL PIG. : The pig-is the most economical, of all animals. It has been found, in ! America' that of what a horse oats 152 per cont. goes to waste, 44 per .edit.. of^the* food consumed by cutllo 11st, similartyjost and 32 per. cent *of all that, sheep take, into their stom achs. But only 12 per cent, of what a pig'eatsjis wasted. Of the food eaten by a bweo-tormaR0 {'growth,;' 'wbile a sheep utilises only . 25" percent'.of; its sustenance 'for growing;/whichi' "of course, means? tho 'pWductioii of'meat. These figures arc obtained!.' * from recent experiments made- by . Government-, exports, who find, as/a result of their study. that the pig;hfts what they-call-"ecoromic superiority" even over poultry. This ! means; th'gt. it produces : more ; meat in proportion, to its weight, find tho animal weighs more in proportion to ! the amount" of fobd it consumes. It was found: that 84 per cent of the carcase of a pig-is used as meat, 75 : per conk of a bullock, and 54 per ' cent o...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.) MESHES OF FATE. OR THE CURSE OF THE BLUE DIAMONDS. SYNOPSIS OP PREVIOUS PART. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

(Ahh HIQHTS RHSHRVBD.) MESHES-"OF"FATE. OR, - THE CURSE OF THE BLUE DIAMONDS. By Hedley Richards, Author of "The j Mine Master's Heir," "Time, tho Avenger," otc., etc. SYNOPSIS OP PREVIOUS PART. Tbo Btory opens in Australia, whor<* Joshua Wcdmoro, an unsuccessful miner, is tramping along in search of fresh fields. Entorinp a hut ho dis covers a man on a rude bod, ill with tho fover. Whilst administering to the sufTorer Wedmore notices n small bag and a loaded revolver under the pil low. On examination the bag proves to contain blue diamonds of enor mous value. Theso ho appropriates, ! as he considers tho fever-stricken one lias only a few hours to live. Wod morc goes on his way, finally reach ing Melbourne, where he books a pas sago for England in tho Fairy Queon. The. vessel is wrootced, Wcdmoro and elderly man named Rupert Heth crington, of Wynthshay. Hall, being the only survivors. After many days 0f suffering and exposure they aro eventually roscucd and placcd on boar...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Court Fixtures. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

Court Fixtures,, Tho following are tho Police Magis trate's dnyo of attendance) ftt tbo courts of this part of the CttStlemaine Distriot: Lnncefield-Wednesdays, 11 a.m. January 21, February 18, Moroh 18 April 16, May 20, Jane 1-7. Bomsey- Wednesdays, 2.30 p.m. on same dates aB Lftncefield, Woodend-Mondays, 3 p.m. Jira uary 12 and 26 ; February $ and 2S; Marob 3 and 23 April ; 27 May 11 and IS. and Jane 22. Kyneton-Tuesdays, 10 a.m, Jan nary 6, 13, and 27 ; February 3, 10, aiid 24-, March 3, 10, 24, and 31 ; April '7 and 28; May 5, 12, and 26:; aDd June-2, 9, 23, nad 30. Incensing Courts will bo held as follows Lancefiold district (held at Romr-ey)-January 21, February 18, llarch 18, April 15, May 20, and June 17. Kyneton-January <5, February 3, Maroh-3, April .7, May 5, and Juno .2. i

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER IV. THE WOOING OP SABINA. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

CHAPTER IV. THE WOOING OP SABINA. "Did;you .know poor Mr. Hether ington before^ you mot him on tho Fu'lry Quoen ?" The speaker was a fair, aristocra tic-looking girl, with a face that spoke of suffering in spite of hor youth. "No, bui 'we #soon became great friends," replied Josh, lotting her in fer .that ho had been ono of tho flrst class passengers. "Then after tho shipwreck we wero together In the boat until we were pickcd up," he added, looking round tho drawing room and thinking that in spito of its, sbabblncBs it was a grand old house; but as Miss* Ossington spoke, his eyes became fixed on her, and he reflected that if sho was not exactly beautiful, she had high-bred air, and looked what she was-an aristo crat to the tips of her fingers. "Did ho toll you anything about bis nephew Donald, who died in Mel bourne ?" sho asked ; and Josh saw that her face had becomo paler, and tears stood in her eyes, and it dawn-, ed on him that sho had loved tho un fortunato young mnn. "Yes,*he ...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PART 2. CHAPTER III. A MYSTERIOUS LOSS. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

PART 2. CHAPTER III. A MYSTERIOUS LOSS. It was n lovoly' morning oarly in October, tho lawyer had gone back to London, after spending, a day or two at the Hall witli Josh, and in troducing him to tho steward, who had managed the estate in the lute Mr. Hetherington's time, and ex plaining various matters to him; but in return not one word had fal ien Irom tho lips, of the man who had como into such unexpected inheri tance as to what his former life had been or where ho had lived before he went to Australia, arid there wero only two [acts about him of which Mr. Saunders felt sure, thac ho was cute and rcticent, and on bis journey to town be mused as to whether thiB reticence was natural or assum ed to conceal something that ho did not wish to be known. Meanwhile, thankful to bo rid of the lawyer, Josh Hetherington, as ho < was now called, proceeded to the li brary, and having locked the door, !ie took a paper out of his pocket book, and after carefully studying the directio...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Queer Maltese Customs. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

Queer Maltese Customs. The pe'oplo of Malta are a very quaint race, and the greatest part of their present-day customs . ft practically tho some as some hun dreds of years ago. Take, for in stance, their methods of harvest ing. " Iustead of cutting tho corn as in England, they kneel down to: their tusk, and, taking nold of n bunch of wheat, pull it out by the roots, so one never sees a field of stubble. The corn is then taken to a corner of the field Whore there is a smooth circular patch of stones, usually about twenty feet radius, is spread over it to a depth ol eighteen Inchcs or so, and trampled on by oxen, a small boy usually leading them by a rope. When the process of threshing is completed, tho straw is forked away and the grain swept up for tho mill. Another curious custom they have which is quite laughable to the stranger, and that is tho way ol watering tho roads. The water* cart consists of A light land o) vchtclc (dubbed by the military n five-barred gate), which consist...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
How to Double the Production of Milk. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

How to Double the Pro duction of Milk. In tho pooling or milk and hnr.d* | ling of a milic herd the yield of any one cow is immediately lost sight of, "There is no permanent, tangible or visible bulk or weight," «ccording#to Mr. Whitley, who hns chaise of this work in Canada. Poured into tho weigh-enn, the milk of one cow loses It* identity in tho general total. Tleing a fluid, it is indis'tingiijshuhlo by its shap.?, n\?.c, or colour, and thus is radically djf: forent from other farm produota the fat steer, the plump chickcn, lus cious berries or ripe grain. The' yield of tho individual cow must bo noted and recorded at the moment of her milking ; then at the end of the season intelligent action can be taken in selection. Thuw will bo seen tho value of records ; they nre indisputable ; they are simply kept, cost only a trifle, and their \nlne increases as they are continuous. Their uso must appeal to every dairyman as being of immense and immediate benefit. It would bo profitable t...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW TO NEUTRALISE DANGEROUS STOMACH ACIDS. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

HOW TO NEUTRALISE DANGEROUS STOMACH ACIDS. Few people besides physicians real* ise the importanco of kenping the food contents of the stomach free from acid fermentation. Healthy normal digestion cannot take place while the delicate lining of the stomach in being infltirocd and distended hy acid and wind-the result of fermenting food in the stomach, To secure pet feet digestion, fermentation must be Atop, ped or prevented, and the acid neutra lised. For this purpose physicians usually recommend binurated raa^- ; nesifl from the chemist and taking j half a teaspoonful in a little hot or oold water immediately after eating. They recommend bisorated magnesia because it is pleasant to take, has no disneroenhlo after effects, and inR'ant ly liopg fermentation neutralise® the acid und makes the sour acid food bland, sweet and easily digested. The regular use of bisurated mag nesia- be Rare you get the bisurated, as other kinds of magnesia are of little value-is an absolute guarantee of he...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Springfield. [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

Springfield. (PROM OUR CORRRHPONDENT) . Mr 13, Soiinlun, who hue decided to relinquiBli dairying for n period, of fered the Brst draft of his forward oows at the Kilmoro special Rale on TneBday. Tho lot comprised 15 very 5ne cows, and good prices weio real ized, ranging from £2 10h to £12 10*. MrScanlnti will dispose of tin- whole of the whole of his hold of 40 uh I hoy are ready. Mr R J. Cloment haRngnin seourcd an excellent price for 112 latnbn Bold on. Tuesday by McBBrs McLuod and MoArthur; 17a 7d waB tho average realised for tho lot.

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Lancefield Mercury and West Bourke Agricultural Record — 26 June 1914

I ,r WELL-KNOWN VICTORIAN NURSES TESTIFY TO CLEMENTS TONIC ^Letter received from Nur»e CttHerine Ktfftmg,-!76 DwU'ttreet,'Nortk Brunswick, 29/3/12, in which the cltiai -CUoenU ITcmc ff««lorcd -b«f -*Uujht#7 ' to hc«1th. -Read each word: CLEMENTS TONIC LTD., "I is writing oi the great good QstaenU Towt did ray dinghter. Early in January last yew. At wu operated upon in hospital for appendicitis. She was eight weeks there, and came home Yery -weak and rcn down. J purchued several-bottles of Clements Tonic to jWe her a course. lTioon "strengthened her nerves, and she was as well as I conld wish her before long. . It is fourteen years ago that I first nsed Clements Tonic, and in my profession as a nvseJL have recommended' that medicine times-out of". number. 1 T>sve 'teen people to "stored to'health and strength, and BLESS THE DAY THET HEARD OF CLEMENTS TONIC. That medicine has never failed to do good when given to any of my .patients, or, indeed, anyone who has sought my advice. Use...

Publication Title: Lancefield Mercury And West Bourke Agricultural Record
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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