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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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WIRELESS TELEPHONY. SUCCESSFUL TRIALS WITH A NEW SYSTEM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

WIRELESS TELEPHONY. SUCCESSFUL TRIALS WITH A NEW SYSTEM.   Successful trials have been made with a   system of wireless telephony at Murray, in Kentucky. The invention is that of a Mr. Nathan Stubble- field, and is apparently simplicity itself. It consists of a single wire, which is buried under the ground at a depth of 6ft., and rises to the same height above it. The part underground is attached to a plate, and a battery of special construction is con- nected with it, and with the telephone trans- mitter and receiver. A number of persons tried the apparatus, and communication was easily effected with persons at a distance of six streets away.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A VICTIM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

A VICTIM.     "Pa, can you tell me what is nervous pro- stration?" "My son, it is the way the father of a large family feels after Christmas when the bills are coming in for his own Christmas presents." Seventeen swimmers have entered for the   Christmas morning handicap in the Serpentine.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GOOD FOR THOMAS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

GOOD FOR THOMAS. Scottish Minister: "I didn't see you at church yesterday, Tummas." Thomas: "Well, surr, it was siccan a wet day it wasna' fit tae turn out a dog in. But I sent the wife, surr."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MUTUAL BENEFIT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

MUTUAL BENEFIT. Young Wife: "I am all run down. I think I'll hire a cook, and husband my strength." Husband; "Yes, do, dear; and strengthen your husband."    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"JOSEPH D" DEAD. A FAMOUS PARISIAN CHEF GONE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

"JOSEPH" DEAD. A FAMOUS PARISIAN CHEF GONE.   Parisian telegrams recently appeared in the   London papers announcing the death of "Joseph,"   the well-known maitre d'hotel.   Joseph was probably the most famous chef of   his day, and his establishment was one of the   show places of Paris. To dine at Joseph's was   the correct thing for every visitor to the gay city   able to afford the experience. He is said to have   been born in Birmingham.   No chef was ever more proud of his "art," and   Joseph's "creations" in the way of new dishes   were worked out by him much in the same way   as an artist proceeds with the elaboration of his   picture.     On one occasion he went to America with Mr.   Vanderbilt, the millionaire, and was in receipt   of an enor...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ROMANTIC AFFAIR. POLISH NOBLE'S SENTENCE. FOR SHOOTING AT AND WOUNDING A LAWYER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

ROMANTIC AFFAIR.     POLISH NOBLE'S SENTENCE.   —♦—   FOR SHOOTING AT AND WOUNDING   A LAWYER.   A Polish nobleman of great wealth, the Che-   valier de Korwin-Piotrowski, has been sentenced   to one year's military service as a private, to the   loss of his rank and title, and to police super-   vision for three years for shooting at and   wounding the lawyer Paskowski in the Opera   House at Warsaw.   The Chevalier de Korwin-Piotrowski explained   that a few days before the encounter at the   opera, Paskowski had married the girl whom he desired to make his wife, and on seeing the   bridegroom coming to the opera alone so soon   after the wedding, he, the Chevalier, jumped   to the conclusion that the young wife, whom he   loved, was bein...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MISS SYBIL SANDERSON. FORTHCOMING MARRIAGE WHICH WILL COST HER TWO MILLIONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

MISS SYBIL SANDERSON.         FORTHCOMING MARRIAGE WHICH   WILL COST HER TWO MILLIONS.   The engagement has been announced in the   New York "Sun" of Miss Sybil Sanderson to   Count Fitzjames, of Paris, who is now travelling   in the United States.   Miss Sybil Sanderson is a daughter of the late   Judge Sanderson, who was Attorney-General of   one of the Western States of America.   She was sent to be educated in Europe, where   she became an operatic star of the first rank. In   1897 she married a Cuban millionaire, Mr. Antonio   Terry.   Almost exactly a year after her marriage An-   tonio Terry suddenly died. His obsequies at St.   Philippe du Roule were a Parisian event.   It was afterwards announced that he had left &...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE DEVELOPMENT OF NATAL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

THE DEVELOPMENT OF NATAL The trade development of Natal is proceeding   at a rapid pace. The imports for the month of   November reached the record sum of £1,000,000,   the value of the imports for the whole of last   year being estimated at £9,800,000. The extra-   ordinary development of the direct trade with Natal is due to the collapse of the Transvaal Republic, and with it the Dutch influence which previously diverted a large portion of the trade to Cape Colony. Now, however, that the Transvaal comes under British rule, the fact that Durban is 200 miles nearer to Johannesburg and Pretoria than any of the Cape ports is being duly recognised, with the result that the Union-Castle, the Clan, and the Bucknall steamship companies have felt bound to inaugurate direct services of steamers to Natal, instead of calling first, as was formerly the case, at the Cape Colony ports. It is pointed out that the 200 miles of land c...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EASILY INTERPRETED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

EASILY INTERPRETED. Mrs. Hoon: "I dreamed last night that you had   given me an automobile."   Mr. Hoon: "H'm, yes! You had a horseless   nightmare—and, by the way, my dear, dreams     usually go by contraries."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE HEAT THAT KILLS CONSUMPTION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

THE HEAT THAT KILLS   CONSUMPTION.   —♦—   Experiments on the temperature at which con- sumption or tubercle bacillus dies show that: (a) A temperature of 65 degrees C., acting for 15 minutes, destroyed the infective properties of consumptive spittle in five out of six instances. (b) Tuberculous milk heated to 60 degrees C. for 30 minutes lost its infective power, (c) Tubercu- lous milk heatad to 68 degrees C. for 20 minutes in a pasteuriser, lost its infective power, (d) In all probability, pasteurisation in which the milk is retained at a temperature above 65 degrees, C. for not less than 20 minutes is effi- cient, especially if no film is formed on the sur- face of the milk.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE HAUNTED CASK. SEASONABLE STORY FROM THE FRENCH CAPITAL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

THE HAUNTED CASK. SEASONABLE STORY FROM THE FRENCH CAPITAL. A concierge of the Rue Folie-Mericourt lost   her husband six months ago (says an "Express"   telegram from Paris on January 1). On his death-bed he promised her that his spirit would never quit her, and swore that he would re- turn to see her. The promise sank into the soul of the widow, who spoke incessantly of it to her neigh-   bours and the tenants of the house. All of these agreed that the oaths of the dying were always fulfilled, and the lone woman awaited with confidence the return of the spirit of her de- funct spouse. The other night some friends had come to sup in her lodge, and, the wine running short, the expectant widow descended to the cellar to obtain more. Suddenly, on passing an empty cask in the middle of the cellar, the light she carried was extinguished, and a sepulchral voice —as if issuing from the cask—uttered the fol- lowing:— "I keep my promise, my dear. It Is...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ABOUT THE COMING MAN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

ABOUT THE COMING MAN.   —♦—   The coming man will have a larger brain and a slighter body than the present. We see now in the more intellectual sections of humanity an in- creasing sensitiveness to stimulants, a growing inability to grapple with such a matter as alco- hol, for instance. No longer can men drink a bottle-full of port; some cannot drink tea; it is too exciting for their highly-wrought nervous systems. The process will go on, and the Sir Wilfrid Lawson of some near generation may   find it his duty and pleasure to make the silvery spray of his wisdom tintinnabulate against the   tea-tray.   —H. G. Wells, in "English Illustrated Magazine."   In a Bohemian mine, 4600ft. deep, the tempera-   ture stands at 120deg. In the deepest English   mine, the Rosebudge, it is 94deg., at 2500ft.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE RED ROBE. CARDINAL ROHAN'S SPECTRE SAID TO WALK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

THE RED ROBE. CARDINAL ROHAN'S SPECTRE SAID TO WALK. The spectre of Cardinal Rohan (according to a Paris telegram) is walking at Heiligenberg, in Alsace. He storms nightly along the road to Still, driving before him the devil, who takes the form of a black dog. The Prince Cardinal, the hopeless lover of Ma- rie Antoinette, has left a well-known name at Heiligenberg. He was coadjutor of Strasbourg, and exercised seignorial rights in the valley of Brenach. Through all this part of Alsace the proud motto of the Rohans is a watchword, "Prince de daigne, Roi ne puis, Rohan je euis," "Prince I would not be, King I may not be, Rohan I am." Indeed, the inhabitants of Heiligenberg believe firmly that the Cardinal always appears when any good is about to befall their town, so they are watching for the apparition, which many de- clare they have seen, with fearsome delight. But sceptics speak of smugglers.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
JOHNNIE AGAIN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

JOHNNIE AGAIN.   An old lady who was a great bore paid a visit   to a neighbor. She prolonged her stay, and   finally said to one of the children, "I'm going   away directly, Johnnie, and I want you to go   part of the way with me."   "I can't," said Johnnie, "for we're going to   have dinner as soon as you leave."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"The Secrets of Eternal Life." A NEW THEORY OF A LIVING DEATH. AN AMERICAN PROFESSOR'S PRONOUNCEMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

"The Secrets of Eternal Life." A NEW THEORY OF A LIVING DEATH. —♦— AN AMERICAN PROFESSOR'S PRONOUNCEMENTS. The ever-fresh mysteries of life and death are once more to the fore to-day; and once more we are assured (says the "Westminster Gazette") that we are on the verge of the most momentous discovery open to man! Professor Loeb, of the University of Chicago, has announced to the American Physiological Society the discovery of a method of nerve ac- tion which the world is solemnly advised "goes far towards solving" the most vital and tor- menting of its problems, his theory being des- cribed as "the most important fundamental physiological generalisation made within 50 years." Professor Loeb's announcement is expressed in 14 statements couched in new and indefinite scientific terms, and hence unintelligible to the laity if stated in his language; but in order that the trend of the professor's statements may be understood, the "Standard's" Chicago cor- respondent gives a most interes...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AT THE FANCY DRESS BALL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

AT THE FANCY DRESS BALL. Tom: "Hullo! Been going to many dances?" Dick: "No, only one. But I've had two fights and five suppers." —"Westminster Budget."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TERRIBLE CRIME IN MOSCOW. A YOUTH KILLS HIS MOTHER AND SISTER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

TERRIBLE CRIME IN MOSCOW.   A YOUTH KILLS HIS MOTHER AND SISTER. Considerable sensation has been caused at Moscow by a double murder committed at the house of an Austrian named Karr, engaged in the management of a Moscow brewery. Karr, on returning home from his business, found that his wife and his elder daughter Martha, aged 18, had been murdered, while his younger daughter Hed- vig, a girl of seven, was barely living. The suspicions of the police fell upon Herr Karr's son, a youth of 20, who, although he had not long left school, was known as a young man of irregular habits. At first he strenuously maintained his inno- cence, but finally confessed his guilt, and gave the following explanation of his crime:—He had stolen 500 roubles from his father's desk to give to a young woman with whom he had rela- tions, and temporarily hid the money in the kitchen. Before he had had an opportunity of taking it out of the house his mother found it. She severely upbraided him, and...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Cape to Cairo Railway. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

Cape to Cairo Railway. —♦—     PROPOSED SINGLE SPAN BRIDGE OVER THE ZAMBESI RIVER   AT THE VICTORIA FALLS.   The construction of the Cape to Cairo railway northwards from Bulawayo towards the Zambesi River, a distance of approximately 300 miles, has already been commenced. The photograph reproduced here from a drawing shows the gorge through which the Zambesi flows a short distance below the Victoria Falls, and the proposed bridge which will carry the railway over the gorge. The section of this gorge has been drawn from an actual survey on the spot by Sir Douglas Fox and Partners, the engineers of the railway, and the drawing of the bridge, which is to be constructed of one span of 600ft. in length, and at a height of 400ft. above the water, has been prepared from a detailed design of the structure. These falls, when opened up by railway, should easily out-distance Niagara as a show-place. Vic- toria has a fall of 400ft., and Niaga...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOUSEKEEPING AT THE CAPE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

HOUSEKEEPING AT THE CAPE.   —♦— In Capetown (according to a correspondent of "Woman's Life") the houses have been dear since the war, the rent being £7 15s per month for a house containing five rooms, pantry, kit- chen, bathroom, etc. Before the war such houses were much cheaper. In the villages a large house with extensive grounds is from £3 to £4 per month. In Cape Colony no Zulus or Kaffir boys are employed to do housework. The yel- low-brown Hottentot girls do the cooking and housework, and the colored boys are coachmen and gardeners. A good cook is paid from £1 10s to £2 per month, while a housemaid receives from £1 to £1 15s. In the villages a good cook can be had for 10s per month, and a housemaid or nurse for 5s.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A GOOD DEFINITION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 15 February 1902

  A GOOD DEFINITION.   "How many horse-power is your automobile?" inquired the man in the dogcart. "Ten horse and two men," responded the owner. "The ten horse-power runs it on the level roads, and my friend and I get out and push it up the hills."    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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