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Elephind.com contains 12,833 items from Waynesburg Messenger, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Important News from Missouri. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

Important News from Missouri. ST. LOUIS, January 24.—Several of the secessionists of this city who were recently assessed for the benefit of the South western fugitives , by order of Gen. Halleck , having failed to pay their assessments, their property has been seized within a day or two past, and is now under execution, to satisf y the claims of the assessments, with twenty-five per cent, additional , according to general order No. 21, Yesterday, Samuel Engler, a prominent merchant, and one of the assessed, had a writ of replevin served on the Provost Marshal General for property seized from him, whereupon he and his attorney, Nathaniel Cox, were arrested and lodged in the military prison. To-day General Halleck issued a special order , directing the Provost Marshal General to convey said Engler beyond the limits of the Department of Missouri, and notif y him not to return without permission from the Commanding General, under punishment according to the law of war. General Ha...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Capture of Oedar Keys. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

The Capture of Oedar Keys. A late Savannah despatch announces that "the Yankees have captured Cedar Keys," Levy county, Florida. The chief value of Cedar Keys consists in the very excellent timber they produce, for ship building purposes. Some of the best vessels in the United States Navy are built of that timber, and as Uncle Sam is bound to keep on adding to that Navy it is of the first importance that the source of supply should be secured. With the Tortugas, Key West, Cedar Keys, and Fort Pickens in our possession, there is not much of the sovereign State of Florida left, worth haying. Cedar Keys is a small group of islands on the West Coast of Florida, near the entrance of VYaca-Sassa Bay—-a Bay much used by the rebels running in goods from Havanna, Nassau, Bermuda, &c. It is also here where the railroad terminates which runs strai ght across the State in a North Eastern direction to Fernandina.— This road was built to transport goods from shi p to ship without re...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Burnside Expedition, [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

The Burnside Expedition, from rebel sources we learn tbat the Burnside fleet has rendezvoused in Pamlico Sound, North Carolina, and that Newborn is indicated as the Eoint of attack. The town of Newern is situated at the head of the Neuse river or estuary emptying into Pamlico Sound, and is an important station on Atlantic and North Caro lina Railroad. This railroad connects the town with Goldsboro, fifty miles, and with Raleigh, the Capital of the State, one hundred miles distant. ' By occupying these two last named places , ail railroad connection between the regions north and south of these places would be cut off, except by way of the Virginia Valley , which will soon fall into our hands. Newbern is one of the oldest towns in the State, and has a population of from five to six thousand. Any good map will show our readers its important position, and the power which an army will have of striking heavy blows to the rebellion, while encouraging tho Union sentiment believed to...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Bailroad Accident. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

Bailroad Accident. TROY , N. Y., January 25.—A tremendous gale prevailed all through Western Vermont this morning. The train that Jleft Troy for Rutland at 6: 15 this morning encountered the gale in the town of Shaftsburg, and while passing an embarkment thirty feet high, a fierce wind broke one of the cars from the coupling and threw it down the embankment. Dr. H. Dwight, of Boston, was instantly killed, and John Robinson, the road master, was severely injured and cannot survive , and two ladies were severely injured. WASHINGTON , January 27.—The War Department has received a dispatch from General Halleck announcing the capture of Lieutenant Colonel Tanner and seventy-nine officers of Jeff. Thompson's command, by the expedition lately sent out from Cape Girardeau.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Iptt atfo §timw [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

Iptt atfo §timw J8^°It admitted by the Richmond journals that the inertia and ennui which have fallen upon the rebel troops, is working out terrible results. The Richmond Examiner says tbat, while the rebel army is accomplishing nothing, the Northern Government has been making movements and assaults , and carrying on plans of attack to suit themselves , without any delays or alarms, ever since they were compelled to make hasty preparations for the defence of Washington several months ago. The whole tone of the Southern papers would seem to indicate a fear that the rebellion is in imminent danger of break ing up. IMPORTANT FROM BOWLING GREEN. —The Louisville Journal claims that General Hardee has arrested General Hickman for burning houses at Cave City, and other places on the Nashville Railroad. It also learns, and credits, that General Buckner has resigned his commission. The rebels at Bowling Green are suffering terribly for money. It is reported that Buckner's children ar...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
THE LATE BATTLE IB KEHTTJOIT. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

THE LATE BATTLE IB KEHTTJOIT. One never gets tired reading the incidents of a brilliant victory especiall y if the victory is on the side we love. The defeat of Zollicoffer and his forces was the most brilliant and most important battle of the war , and we dwell upon its details with peculiar interest. A letter written by an intelligent correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial, who rode upon the field of carnage as the din of battle was d ying away, presents a peculiarly vivid picture ofthescente. We take a few extracts : ZOLLICOFFER. Only one dead man had been brought in. The bod y laid upon the ground in front of one of the Minnesota tents, surrounded by some twenty soldiers. If had been stripped of all the clothing except the pants, and two soldiers were busy in washing off the mud , with which it had been covered. It was almost as white and transparent as the most delicate wax-work. The fatal wound was in the breast, and was evidently made with a pistol ball , as it co...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Importance of the Late Battle—Three Hundred Eebels Killed-A Half Million of Property Lost -- Thomas has 20,000 Men. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

Importance of the Late Battle—Three Hundred Eebels Killed-A Half Million of Property Lost -- Thomas has 20,000 Men. We devote considerable ot our space to-day to interesting details of the late battle at Webb's Cross Roads, the most crushing and depressing defeat to the rebels, by far, since the commencement of the war. The magnitude of our victory and the loss of the enemy grow largely by each account. From all sources we gather that the enemy have lost two hundred and eighty-three killed, and two hundred and fifty wounded and prisoners. Wm. W. Strew, Gen. Schoepff's Brigade Surgeon, reports officially that our loss was only thirty-eig ht killed and one hundred and thirty-four wounded. Of the rebel dead, whom he saw buried, there was one hundred and ninety, and of the wounded, whom ho saw dressed, there were seventy-four. Aud at least a half a million dollars worth of property has fallen into our possession, and enough of guns to arm all the Union fig hting men in that dist...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Ool, Fry's Account of ZoUiooffer's Death, [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

Ool, Fry's Account of ZoUiooffer's Death, While on the border of "old fields" a stranger in citizen dress rode up by his Bide eo near that he could have put his hand upon his shoulder , and said , "don't let us be firing on our own men—these are our men," pointing at the same time toward our forces. Colonel Fry looked upon him inquiringly a moment, upon which he rode forward not more than fifteen paces, when an officer came dashing up, first recognizing the stranger, and almost at the same instant firing upon Col. Fry. At the same moment the stranger wheeled bis horse, facing Colonel Fry, when the Colonel shot him in the breast. The Colonel showed me the field glass which he took from the bod y, and which was identified as tbe one owned b}- Major Heiveti. at the time he was taken prisoner by the rebels. Col. Fry also has the coat and watch taken from the body. The watch has the name F. K. Zoliicoffer engraved upon it. I make this statement in justice to Col. Fry, because there...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Effects of Zollicoffer's Eout. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

Effects of Zollicoffer's Eout. The Richmond Dispatch, in another editorial comment on Zollicoffer's rout, says: The only serious danger resulting from this defeat is the possibility that tbe enemy may be able to reach the railroad at some point near Knoxville, and cut off our communication, into the Mississippi Valley. The imminence of this danger is fully appreciated by the Con federate authorities, and the exigency will be promptly met by the prop-| er measures. There is little danger | of any immediate advance of the enemy in the direction of Cumberland I Gap, which is a hundred miles from Somerset; and if he would undertake ' such an advance, we have force strong enough, with the aid of the ; formidable fortifications guarding its : passes, to keep an army at bay. The real danger is of his advancing along ! the route of our own discomfiited 1 army, and of his reaching the railroad in the nei g hborhood of Knoxville, but this danger may be more ' easily guarded against.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Burnside Exuedition. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

The Burnside Exuedition. We have been mistaken and disappointed as to the destination of the Burnside Expedition. It was not intended for Savannah or Charleston. as we hoped and believed, ' but for Pamlico Sound, to operate against Newbern, &c, &e. Whether it will proceed now, after the perilous delay caused by the late terrible weather, remains to be seen. The enemy have, doubtless, by this time concentrated a large number of troops within accessible distances of the menaced points, and assert that they are ready to receive us. We have no doubt of it, neither can we see any result to be achieved by an attack on Newbern or Wilmington, commensurate with the great risk of loss and defeat which will have to be encountered. The reports brought from the expedition we are very glad to learn by official dispatches received at Washington from General Burnside himself, are grossly exaggerated. Burnside reports only one vessel, and only three lives lost. The men were chc...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Burnside ExpeditioE—Official Eeport. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

The Burnside ExpeditioE—Official Eeport. WASHINGTON , Jan. 23.— A special messenger with dispatches from Gen. Burnside reached Washington this morning. They are dated : Department of North Carolina, Hatteras Inlet. January 2(5. The messenger left Hatteras on Sunday. General Burnside states: "We left our anchorage at Annapolis on Tuesday, the 9th, and after a protracted passage owing to dense fogs, we arrived at Fortress Monroe on Friday at 12 o'clock. On Saturday morning, the 10th, we proceeded at once to sea. But owing to fogs on Saturday and Sunday night our progress was very slow. On Monday, the 13th, the weather cleared with a heavy wind, and the rough sea caused our vessels to labor very heavily, and some were obliged to cut loose from the vessels they were towing. Most of them, however, passed over the bar and anchored inside the harbor about 12 o'clock noon on the 15th, just in time to escape the severe gale of Monday ni ght and Tuesday. The propellor City of New York r...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Washington News Items. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

Washington News Items. NEW YORK. January 27.—The Washington correspondence of the New York papers says :—A rebel deserter, who came into our lines last evening, contradicts the report that the rebels have fallen back from Manassas. He says about ten regiments have gone South, but that the main body of the rebel army has not changed its position. They have near l y abandoned the idea that Gen. McClellan intends to attack them this winter. The rebel line of defence extends upwards of sixty miles. They expect the most sanguinary battle to take place at Centreville , for they have that place, for miles around, almost imprcgnably fortified. He says it was reported for several days that McClellan was dead, and there was great rejoicing, for the rebel Generals have a perfect dread of meeting him in battle.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
i «>.*«—- „ Bridee Burners Sentenced. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

i «>.*«—- „ Bridee Burners Sentenced. ST. Louis. Jan. 28.—The military j commission assembled at Palmyra j for the trial of bridge burners, found seven persons guilty, and sentenced them to be shot. The sentence was approved by Major General Halleck, and they will be exe cuted at the time and place hereafter designated. A gentleman who reached this city yesterday from Palmyra, reports the i long bridge on the Hannibal and St. Joe Railroad as burned by the rebels. On Saturday night the bridge had just been completed.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
LATEST MAEKET EEP0ETS. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

LATEST MAEKET EEP0ETS. j FRIDAY, Jan. 31st, 1862. j FLOUR—The flour market remains quiet i but steady with no change in prices. The j demand is limited, and the transactions i are almost entirely restricted to small lots. ! Sale of 50 bbla Family at $4,90@5,00; 115 I do do atS5@5,10 ; 200 dodo at §5@5,10. I Extra is held at $4,50(2(,4,60, and Fancy ] brands $5,50@5,75. I BBTTER—Steady, with a demand fully ; equal to the supply; sale of 3 bbls prime | Boll at 14c, and 5 bxs choice do at 15c. I SEEDS.—unchanged; sale of ten Lush I Timothy at $1,75, and 27 bush Clover at | $3,75. I BUCKWHEAT FLOUR.—plenty and dull j j sale of 1500 fbs in sacks at $1,50 per cwt. i GREEN APPLES.—steady, wilh a limited , supply in market; sale of 10 bbls comj mon at §2,50, and 10 do. prime at $3,25. ' ; BEANS.—firm, with a sale of 8Q bushels t small White in two lots, at $1,25 per bush. HOMINY .—Sale of 10 bbla. Pearl at $4,50 ! per bbl. CORN .—unchanged ; sale on wharf of : 700 bush prime Yellow at...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Uteris [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

Uteris On Thursday, January 2nd, by Jackson Hinderman, Esq., Mr. ANTHO -V * MI___R to Miss M ART F- BTCHKR, both of Aleppo township. On tb» 82d of Ja-msWy, 1862, by Bev. J. Adams, Mr. F RANCIS M. BOWBB, aaa Miss ' ioni £. Gacs, both of Tayette oo., ?».

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A PETITION FOE EMANCIPATION. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

A PETITION FOE EMANCIPATION. The Abolitionists of New York, headed by Bryant, Cheever & Co., are scattering a Petition broadcast over the country, praying Congress to emancipate the Slaves in the Southern States. They say, among other equally absurd and extravagant things, "That we are admonished—and day by day the conviction is gathering strength among us—that no harmony can be restored to the nation, no peace brought back to the people, no perpetuity secured to our Union, no permanency established for our government, no hope elicited for the continuance of our freedom, until slavery shall be wiped out of the land utterly and forever." What process of reasoning has brought these astute gentleman to the conclusion that this Government cannot be preserved without changing its fundamental character, we are left to conjecture. It is but charitable to presume that with these persistent fanatics the "wish is father to the thought" —that they are weary of a Government of t...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
TAXABLE PEOPEETY OF the STATE, [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

TAXABLE PEOPEETY OF the STATE, By a tabular statement appended to the Auditor General's Report for the year 1861, we learn that the total valuation of Real and Personal Property in the several counties of this Commonwealth, subject to taxation, amounts to $569,049,867, upon which a State tax of $1,479,377 81 has been assessed. The total population of the State, by the census of 1860, 2,921,045 ; and the number of taxable inhabitants is 642,462. The aggregate State tax on Watches, amounts to $13,865 23. The total valuation of Real and Personal Property in Greene County amounts to $2,923,916, upon which a State tax of $7,-562 92 is assessed. The population of the county, by the census of 1860, was 24,406, and the number of taxable inhabitants 5,615.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A SPLENDID INSTRUMENT. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

A SPLENDID INSTRUMENT. We dropped in, a few days since, on our old friends, Harry Kleber & Bros., Fifth street, Pittsburgh, and examined an Organ Harmonium from the celebrated Factory of CARUART, NEEDHAM & Co., New York, and recently purchased for the Methodist Episcopal congregation of Cadiz, Ohio. It has two banks of keys, 13 stops, an octave and a half of base pedals, and a pedal and stop well. It is of solid walnut, oil finish, and is a credit to any establishment. Although it may be made almost as soft as a lute in tone, it has power enough to fill nearly any cathedral in the country. Its cost was only $450.— Other smaller, but similar Harmoniums, may be had of the same manufacturers or their Agents, for $250. ' We sincerely wish our village churches could all afford one of these instruments.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
. m • » » DEAD. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

. m • » » DEAD. Another gallant Greene county volunteer is dead. WM. EVANS, a private in the Ringgold Cavalry, and a brother to Lieut. L. EL. EVANS, died in the hospital at Washington city, a few days since, of Typhoid Fever. His remains were brought home by his brother and interred by a large concourse of relatives and friends.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
GIEAED HOUSE. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 5 February 1862

GIEAED HOUSE. This popular Hotel, Smithfield street, Pittsburgh, is still under the supervision of S. L. HOCKERT, Esq., one of the bestnatured and best-hearted fellows the sun ever shone on. His only thought is the comfort of his guests, and all his energies are expended in efforts to please them.— His table and general accommodations are unexceptionable, and his bills refreshingly moderate. We understand the Girard is to be handsomely refitted in the Spring, and rendered a much more inviting stopping-place. As it is, however, no one can find fault with it, and no one is disposed to, as its large share of business testifies. Go to the Girard, by all means, if you want to find all the comforts of a quiet and luxurious home.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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