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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1996

Farm Bureau Volume 55, Number 10 Veteran farm leaders win top kudos By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor RICHMOND—TWo of Virginia's most influential political leaders for agriculture have been honored with the 1996 Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Distinguished Service Award. J.P. Davis Jr. of Brookneal and Raymond R. Kite of Culpeper received their awards Dec. 4 at the VFBF Annual Convention in Richmond. Between the two of them, Davis and Kite have 37 years of experience on the VFBF Board of Directors. "J.P. has been very dedicated to Farm Bureau and he's helped make tough decisions," said VFBF President C. Wayne Ashworth. "In his own quiet way, he's carried a big stick. "I've served on the board of directors with Raymond for 20 years," he added. "If something wasn't good for Farm Bureau, he didn't support ft." i Davis and Kite both retired from the VFBF board Dec. 5. Dav|s> 75, tfte former ptetrict 10 director, had served on Br Joe H. Williams -» . i t \" A *" ( ** -/V '...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1996

Farm Bureau News Fruit grower is 1997 Farm Woman of the Year By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist RICHMOND —Active, dependable, dedicated, committed and focused are all adjectives used to describe the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 1997 Farm Woman of the Year. Margaret Douglas "can always be depended upon to help in whatever way she can," said the Rev. Timothy E. Teates, pastor of Relief United Methodist Church in Winchester. "She has chosen to use her retirement to serve the people of her district and county, and to work to preserve farming and rural life which is so important to this area. I cannot think of a better choice for the Farm Woman of the Year." Mrs. Douglas received the award Dec. 2 during the VFBF's Annual Convention in Richmond. The award spotlights a farm woman whose achievements mark the importance of women to their family farms and agriculture. On Mrs. Douglas' 1,900-acre family farm in Frederick County, she and her husband, James, grow 60 acres of peac...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1996

December 1996/ january 1997 What's next? Peanut-sniffing dogs in schools? A growing number of schools and preschools across the United States are instituting policies to control or ban the consumption of peanuts and peanut products at school. Estimates indicate that 1 percent of American children are allergic to peanuts, forcing schools to take drastic action. Peanut M&Ms, Reese's Pieces and peanut butter crackers —staples in school lunches for years —appear to be on the verge of expulsion. Newsweek magazine said a New York school has banned all forms of peanut products from the premises. Another school has created peanut-free classrooms. A school in Minnesota now has set up separate tables for those children needing a peanut butter-and-jelly fix. Are peanut sniffing dogs patrolling school hallways far behind? Research, cotton promotion, tax reform top list of 1997 issues A year's worth of Virginia Farm Bureau grassroots policy development is ready for unveiling at the 1...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1996

Farm Bureau News Roanoke Co. FB director retiring soon ROANOKE—L. Joe Wertz, a former director of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, has retired from the Roanoke County Farm Bureau Board of Directors. His involvement in agriculture has had far-reaching benefits. He became a full-time farmer after he retired from Norfolk and Western Railroad. Next, he helped revitalize the farmers market in Roanoke and he sold produce, flowers and bedding plants at the market each week. He and the former Mary Agnes Bondurant have been married for 60 years. They have three children, four grandchildren and two great grandchildren. They have been active at First Baptist Church in Roanoke, serving as a deacon and teacher for many years. Rural areas to get money for improved water quality RICHMOND—More rural Virginians will have safer drinking water thanks to $24.9 million in loans from the Rural Development sector of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Tazewell County and Carroll County public serv...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1996

December 1996/ january 1997 (MMME ® f nHHHHi ® li^jjj^ WMM| 7WR9 |ira^|l&«SPpr Buy a new Dodge Truck and pick up a ton of cash. Up To $500 Cash Back To Farm Bureau Members. extra $300 to $500 in the deal. $500 cash back on '96 and '97 Ram Vans and As a member, you qualify for $300 back on Ram Wagons. That's on top of any other all new 1996 and 1997 5.9 L V-8 Magnum Ram national Dodge cash back offer* All you need 1500 pickups. to do is get a certificate from your state's Farm ; »--r< $500 back on '96 Bureau validating that you've been a member 2500 and 3500 Dodge dealer. Where you'll discover it pays to mm 5.9LV-8, tThis cash back offer is valid for members of participating Farm Bureaus, is scheduled to expire 9/.KV97. and is subject to change. It may not be used in combination with any j Cummins Diesel other Chrysler Corporation certificate program or certain other special programs. Ask ■"%/. - ? for restrictions and details. Farm Bureau* is a registered serv...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1996

Farm Bureau News Directors elected during convention (Continued from page 1) will serve two-year terms. Williams owns and operates 475 acres in Pittsylvania County. He produces tobacco, corn and hay, and raises Angus cattle. As District 10 director, he will represent Campbell, Halifax and Pittsylvania counties. Williams replaces J.P. Davis Jr., who retired this year after serving 10 years on the board. Williams has been a member of the Virginia Farm Bureau for 25 years. He is currently serving his fourth year as president of the Pittsylvania County Farm Bureau. The Virginia State Police Academy graduate is also a member of the VFBF Flue Cured Tobacco Commodity Committee and is a member and past president of the Pittsylvania County Young Farmers' Committee. In addition, Williams is a deacon and moderator at Greenpond Baptist Church. Reese, who served as 1996 chairman of the state Young Farmers' Committee, will continue to serve as chairman for the next — PMN KILLER It works better th...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1996

December 1996/ January 1997 Researcher describes new uses for tobacco By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—Tobacco without tar and nicotine may be possible through genetic engineering in the future, a researcher told farmers Dec. 3. Dr. Carole Cramer, a genetic engineer and researcher, spoke at the VFBF Women's Luncheon at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 71st Annual Convention at the Richmond Marriott. Dr. Cramer, an associate professor of plant pathology and physiology at Virginia Tech, has been studying the potential use of tobacco plants to produce a human enzyme to treat Gaucher disease, which is sometimes fatal. A farmer in the audience of 300 asked if genetic engineering could be used to "get rid of tar and nicotine" in cigarettes. "You would stick one gene in to turn off the (nicotine-producing) gene," Dr. Cramer said. She mentioned that cigarette manufacturers might be looking into ways to rid cigarettes of nicotine. Another listener asked about a mispercept...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1996

Farm Bureau News CNN reporter recounts Gulf War experiences By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND —After describing the navigation of a cruise missile through downtown Baghdad, CNN reporter John Hollirran told farmers gathered in Richmond that space-age technology can only help them. Holliman, a national correspondent for CNN, spoke at the 1996 Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention at the Richmond Marriott on Dec. 2. He was one of three CNN reporters who covered the Gulf War from Iraq's capital. They could hear bombs exploding all around when the allied air attack began on Baghdad in january I 991. "I was in room 906 in a hotel and I saw a cruise missile come to a red-light and turn right," Holliman said. "It came down a street and knew where to turn and then it went past a market and didn't hurt anyone. Then it went a little farther and blew up the air force headquarters." Holliman noted that the cruise missile came from a U.S. manufacturer. He also pointed ou...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1996

December I 996/ January 1997 Beyer wants agriculture in forefront By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—Lt. Gov. Donald S. Beyer Jr. pointed to technology, education and economic development as ways to keep agriculture in the forefront of Virginia's economy. Beyer spoke to farmers on Dec. 4 at the 71st Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention. The convention was Dec. 2-5 at the Richmond Marriott. In showing the importance of agriculture, Beyer said agriculture contributes $11 billion to Virginia's gross state product. Some 250,000 jobs are tied to agriculture, which represents one in seven jobs. The state needs to continue to attract new agribusinesses and expand existing agribusinesses. "To help farmers continue to thrive in Virginia, we need to invest in technology and applied research," Beyer told farmers. "The place to start is on Virginia's college and university campuses." Virginia Tech and Virginia State University will continue to support agriculture throu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1996

Farm Bureau News Farmers turn to science to fight plant diseases (Continued from page 1) duction regions of Virginia. Each AREC functions as a field laboratory for undergraduate and graduate students, and opens its doors for field days for school children and adults. Researchers at the Eastern Shore center "are always willing to stop what they're doing to help you," Hall said. "If you have an insect you can't identify or a disease on a plant, and they can't identify it, they'll go to work on it. They're a valuable resource to those of us in the produce business." The station also tests new pesticides, said Dr. Henry P. Wilson, acting assistant director. "We've tested some pesticides and found they don't work. We've had to tell growers and manufacturers. Manufacturers appreciate this." Pesticide manufacturers test their own products. But certain species of insects or types of plant diseases may be more resistant on the Eastern Shore than in the region where the manufacturer tested it...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1996

December 1996/ January 1997 Virginia farmers advised to think globally when marketing products By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist RICHMOND —Interaction in today's global economy is the key to New Zealand's successful agricultural business, and Virginia farmers may want to follow suit. That was the message from Philip Lewin, first secretary to the New Zealand embassy. He spoke to farmers gathered at the Richmond Marriott Dec. 2 for the 71 st Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention. "Our thriving agricultural export trade is the result of more than a century of hard work by farmers, scientists and exporters," Lewin said during a conference titled "Prospering in the Free Market." Virginia farmers are concerned with the reduction of some farm subsidies under the new Farm Bill, but Lewin told them how New Zealand farmers learned to succeed without any government subsidies. At the time of the Korean War, New Zealand was among the five wealthiest countries in the world...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1996

Farm Bureau News Recognition goes to reporters in three cities By GREG HICKS VFBF Communications Director RICHMOND—A Danville newspaper and two television news operations were recipients of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 1996 Journalism Awards. The Danville Register & Bee claimed top honors in the daily newspaper category for its outstanding coverage of agriculture during 1996. It was the second time the Register & Bee had won the competition, which began in 1988. Also claiming top honors for the second time was WVIR-TV 29 in Charlottesville, which was named a co-winner in the broadcast category of the Journalism Award along with WTVR-TV 6 in Richmond. The awards were presented on Dec. 4 during the VFBF's Annual Convention at the Richmond Marriott. The honors are handed out each year to the newspapers and Page County teen lauded By CHRIS BAXTER VFBF Staff Writer and Designer RlCHMOND—Research, edu- cation and promotion are the ingredients of a thriving...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1996

December 1996/ January 1997 FB children create pastoral scenes in posters By CHRIS BAXTER VFBF Staff Writer and Designer RICHMOND —Fourteen children were recognized at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 1996 Annual Convention for creating posters that best depict farm life. The winning posters were on display at the Richmond Marriott during the Dec. 2-5 convention. The winners received trophies for their efforts. Farm Bureau women's committees sponsored the contest within their counties to promote interest among children of Farm Bureau members. The junior contest involved ages 4-6, and the senior contest covered ages 7-10. One child's poster was a mon- ARCH STEEL BUILDINGS Buy U.S.A. made. Keep your hard-earned money in America. Low cost. Simple, fast construction (no heavy equipment needed). All steel—maintenance free. * 20 YEAR WARRANTY * PRICES SLASHED *on inventory In stock 25 X 30 40 X 62 50 X 200 30X40 40X 100 60X 140 Some other sizes available American Steel Span by Univer...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1996

Farm Bureau News (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 1 5 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. > Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please TYPE or PRINT your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. (You do not have to use this coupon.) * Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I DEADLINE: Ads must be received by the lOTH of each month. I Repeat ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. (For your convenience we are providing this coupon. Please submit ads to the Farm Bureau News before the 10th.) NAME: MEMBER NO.: COUNTY: ADDRESS: CITY: STATE: ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER: ( ) ADVERTISEMENT: (Please print or type one...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1996

December 1996/]anuary 1997 Rockingham County woman wins crown By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—Tara C. Cupp of Bridgewater won the 1997 Miss Virginia Farm Bureau title Dec. 2 in a ceremony at the Richmond Marriott. The contest was part of the 1996 Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention. The blonde competed against eight contestants from across Virginia for the title. Contestants were judged on the basis of an interview, a speech about agriculture, general appearance, poise and knowledge of Farm Bureau. VFBF President C. Wayne Ashworth presented Miss Cupp with a crown, and Helen Neese, state chairman of the VFBF Women's Committee, gave her roses. As Miss Virginia Farm Bureau, she will represent the VFBF at significant agriculture events throughout the year. She is the daughter of Billy and Nancy Cupp of Bridgewater. The Cupps operate a beef cattle farm in Rockingham County. A sophomore at Virginia Tech, Miss Cupp is majoring in agriculture education. She pla...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1996

Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Choice: Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? Best Value Now you can choose a plan which will give you the coverage you For Your Dollar: need... and will fit your budget. We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. \ Personal Service: With over 100 local Farm Bureau offices throughout Virginia, \ \ personalized service can be as close as your own community. gIN p , D r Health Care Coverage 7 # 1 Broad Range OI # J£ y OU are unc j er a g e 55 — £ or Individuals or families Coverage • If you are over age 65 — Medicare supplement • If you are a small business — coverage for __ 2-99 employees. HE£!Z£il You choose the health care plan that fits your needs... and your budget! ÜbJ. Speakers urge farmers to economy* g!M Dvo wanna-be go...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1997

Farm Bureau Volume 56, Number I Lawmakers deciding on fate of wolf dogs By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—One group wants wolf dogs banned, and another wants permission to kill them if they attack livestock. A third group wants them treated the same as other dogs. A wolf dog is a hybrid that is part dog and part wolf. Wolf dogs range from 5 to 98 percent wolf. Many are part German shepherd, Siberian husky or Alaskan malamute. Estimates indicate Virginia may have 4,000 wolf dogs. Virginia's current livestock predator laws cover dogs, but not wolf dogs or coyote dog mixes, said Wilmer Stoneman, assistant director of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Public Affairs Department. Therefore, livestock owners are eligible for compensation from dog owners, but not wolf dog owners, if one attacks and causes the death of their livestock. The law allows livestock owners to kill a dog to protect livestock, noted Stoneman, who has been Teens to get paid to drive safely By KATHY ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1997

Farm Bureau News Proper safety seat use can prevent fatalities By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist RICHMOND—Parents of young children spend lots of time trying to make the world safer—from safeguarding their homes to holding their children's hands in parking lots. They warn their children to stay away from strangers, and they buy alarm systems for their homes. Yet II children under the age of 4 died in Virginia auto accidents last year because their child safety seats were not used or were improperly installed, reported the Transportation Safety Training Center at Virginia Commonwealth University. Ninety percent of parents don't properly install car seats, said Janet Carnes, an instructor for VCU's Transportation Safety Training Center. "I think the majority of people are aware of the need for child safety seats, but they might not understand the need for proper installation," said Virginia Farm Bureau Safety Director Bruce Stone. Car seats are important and use of them is...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1997

February 1997 Forestry bill gained quick passage in legislature Before the 1997 General Assembly was but a week old, Farm Bureau had notched its first major victory of the session. The issue at stake was Senate Bill 592, The Private Forest Land Conservation Bill. We favored this 1996 carry-over bill because of the proliferation of an array of mind-boggling local ordinances that would have continued to restrict environmental forestry practices and the harvest of wood products across the state. The ordinances have been costing forestry owners a lot of money. In some cases landown- ers have tried to harvest small acreages of timber, but when Balancing of federal budget is high on AFBF priority list The likelihood of Congress passing a constitutional amendment to balance the federal budget is increasing. According to a recent USA Today article, members of Congress are feeling the pressure from back home to approve an amendment this year. There's even optimism that enough state legislatu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1997

Farm Bureau News New long-distance service can reduce bills By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist RICHMOND—Some customers have already cut their long-distance phone bills in half with a new phone service available to Farm Bureau members. Virginia Farm Bureau Federation has switched its long-dis-tance phone service for members from BTI to The Farm Bureau Connection, a long-distance service program designed for Farm Bureau members. Brad Lowery, director of VFBF's Field Services Department, has already made the switch and he is "very pleased" because he is saving 50 percent over his former long-distance Money going to safe drivers (Continued from page 1) buckle up; and to drive defensively- After watching the video, a Farm Bureau insurance agent reviews a driver safety workbook with the teen, who then takes a 10question quiz. The program is completed when the teen-ager signs a contract agreeing to keep the four promises. The contract states that if there are no traffic convicti...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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