ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,559 items from Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
4,559 results
ABRAHAM LINCOLN'S LAST SPEECH. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

ABRAHAM LINCOLN'S LAST SPEECH. On the occasion when Abraham Lin coin. Presilent of the United States. mllie his last speech to the people April 11. 18i5-tllere was a vast crowd outside the White House, Wash ington. The President spoke from one of the windlows: and the scene is described by Mr. Francis I?. Tirowne in his "Everyday Life of Abraham Lincoln" "Xs Lincoln spoke the multitude was as silent as if the courtyard hadl been dieserted. T'hen. as his speecll iwas written on loose sileets and the candlles were iplacci too low, he took a light in Ills hand ansl went on read ing. But lhe follnll Illfticullty ill lhandling tile monullscript and1 lolling the candllestick. so a friend wleo stooll bellindl tile llr:allerv of tile window reached out alndt took t11e candle .nd1 10el11 it Ilntil t10e cnOd of tile speech. an1111 the t'residlnt let the loose pages fall on tile floor one by one as fast as lie was through with them. "Presently Tad Lincoln. havino -s freshed hlimlself at the dl...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PHANTOM GOLD. (Published by Special Arrangement.) (Copyright.) CHAPTER XVIII. The Torn Photograph. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

PHANTOM GOLD. By EM3IA M. MORTIMER, Author of "Second Lady Evesham," "Cords of Sin," "Robert WVynastan's Ward," Etc., Etc. (Published by Special Arrangement) (Copyright) CHAPTER XVIIL. The Torn Photograph. .Mrs. Wilding returned to Netherton Manor according to arrangement, but the next morning there was so severe a frost that hunting was impossible, had Lilian felt in a mood for it. She asimpDI wished to be left alone to turn over and over again that horrible thing which Philip had laid before her. She was twenty-four, an age when she possessed the bestowal of a wo man's love. and this she had lavished on Bob Graham in a way she did not realise till she learned that he had left England in company with another woman who ere now was probably his wife. Wihat a blind. opinionated fool Philip must take her for her refusal to listen to his warning. She was leaving the dining-room (Sir Horace had called Philip to the study) with a thought that she would go back to her room, when one of the...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GERMAN'S TERRIBLE TIME AT MESSINES. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

GERMAN'S TERRIBLE TIME AT MESSINES. -4------- * A German letter found upon the Messines Ridge gives a good picture of what the enemy is now enduring. It is dated June 6, and the address given is "a shell-hole in Hell." The epistle runs : "Thanks for kind letter. I am quite well, but discouraged. You have no idea what it is like. Fourteen days passed in hellish fire day and night. In this marvellously beautiful weather we crouch together in holes and await our doom. The dead here are piled up by their artil lery alone,, which is far superior to ours. The night through we lie pre pared fdr action with gas masks on our faces, as Tommy fires gas shells and three or four hundred-weight of ariel torpedoes all night. No trench work, it is not to be thought of with shrapnel all night. The wounded and poisoned are con tinually being collected in groups, and sent off. Many dead, too, from gas poisoning. Up to now, our div ision, only three regiments, has lost 3400 men in barely three months. ...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Capture of Beersheba and Gaza. OUR LIGHT HORSE REGIMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

The Capture of Beersheba and Gaza. OUR LIGHT HORSE REGIMENTS. Once again our Australian MIounted men have distinguished themselves in P'alest'ne. This time by the capture of the ancient Biblical towns of Beer sheba and Gaza. The victory was a great one, as it was the result of quiet organisation and secrecy made by the British commander. The success. however, could not have been achiev ed were it not for the characteristic tdash and valor of our Light ilorst Regiments. No branch of the army has done more magnificent work thanll these men; their sacrilicial charges on Gallipoli will live in immortality. P'opea 11111, Wallker's Ridge, Quinn's I'st, tiill 60, will always occupy a high place on the pillar of Australian valol ill this war. Subsequent to tile evacuation of Cal lipoli. the Australian Light IHorse. with only three weeks' "respite" ill Cairo, were despatched to the Libyan desert to chase and break up the Sen ussi rebel forces. This accomplished they were then transferred to ...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Her Last Venture. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

Her tLast Venture. A lady who lives in a fashionable suburb is of a saving turn of mind and manages to combine her love of economy with a due regard for her husband's appearance by turning his old top hats into "tidles" and waste paper baskets. The other day she saw on the ball table a Drehistoric hat, venerable with age. She seized it in triumph, and had just removed the brinm, covered the body with Ifght blue silk, and was fin fehlng it off with a tasteful arrange ment of lace and bows, when she was interrupted by the servant: "Please, mum, the piano-tuner says he can't find his top hat nowheres; he left it In the hall, he says." Ten minutes later that tuner left the house with a cap on his head and a pound note is his pocket. "Tidles" are now acarce in that home.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BURNED GRAIN OR FLOUR. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

BURNED GRAIN OR FLOUR. It is observted that in case of fire. wheat and flour dIo not burn to ally great extent, but are spoiled by water and smoke. As there are freqllent cases whbere grain is called upon to suffer froml fire during the war, a few considerations on tills: subject will be timely, especi:ally as regards the subsretquent use of such grain or flour as can be saved. Following the fire at tile Mans grain elevators in France, 5. Ernest Vilere made a Sseries of tests to see what use could be made of wheat and flour left from the fire. Thirty sacks of wheat were milled atnd tile flour tested, anid, again, samples of flour were taken direct. Thils latter showed different results, and varied between good tasting and disagreeable, according to the case, but in general the bread was of fair rquality. Whleat increases in density somewhat because it is driedt by the fire; for instan"e, the proportion is 1 to 1.13. Five per cent. of the grain was carbonised. It appears that bran wi...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ARE YOUR EYES BLUE? [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

ARE YOUR EYES BLUE? What is the color of your eyes. to the light of scicnce there nrc only two sorts of eyes-itlne nod not hlue. It is a farct tlit nll rees nre bloe or tluie-grey in rontt. bout a great mtnoy hare sonmc other pigluent in frotit of the iris. Hence :ipetiars a strange lair of tieratdite. In the village of florbage. TLeicester shtire, recentlyan interesting experi ment was mode. .A group of nettmbers of the thritish Association was drawn tup in line alotng otte side of a narrow lane. On the other were mtarceied by. ntid halted at intervals, oete Ittindred or so school-chitdren, .distinguished witth cariosis btaIges. Ardent in.estigators maould noir and again advance front tie line of scientists, halt a groitp of chtiltiren, and instiect witt nimagnifying-gtasses at close quarters thicir eyes. It is asserted that wtiere both par ents trave bILe eyes ail tthe ctiltitren thava bIlue eyes, and where both par ents harev brown eyes 11 the chil dren have broirt eyes; bitt it ...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BANANA AND POTATO COMPARED. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

BANANA AND POTATO COMPARED. The composition of the potato and the banana shows an interest ing similarity both as regards total carbohydrate and the amounts of the different mineral constituents. While the banana can hardly be re garded as a potato substitute, the fact that it has practically the same coaloric value as the potato is worthy of note. Of even greater. importance is the fact that bananas may be eat en uncooked. The banana would ap pear to be a particularly valuable food to employ in the dietetic treat ment of patients:with nitrogen reten tion, suffering from inflammation of the vridneys. Very satisfactory re sults have been obtained in mild cases of this complaint. So long as the patients exhibit no distaste for the fruit, there would seem to be no reason why bananas should not be employed In considerable'quantity.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FORTUNES IN BIBLES. £15,000 BETWEEN THE LEAVES. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

FORTUNES IN BIBLES. £15,000 BETWEEI THE LEAVES. It has happened not infrequently that eccentric wealthy people have i concealed sums of money in the famit ly Bible, where it has been discovered by chance long after their decease. Siclf an incident recently occurred in Paris. A young French potln return ed home from the Front to find that his father had Just died. He had left him nothing in his will, only the family Bible. Closer inspection re vealed between its pages securities to the value of £15.0410 I A few years ago a young nobleman who was in financial diffictulties had occasion to refer to the family Bible for a date there recorded.' In so do Ing he came across a number of Bank of England notes, amounting collec tively to a considerable sum, which more than met his liabilities. Then he recalled his mother's dying words that "Help might he found in the Bible when all other sources failed." But he had paid small heed to the injunction, and certainly never dream ed of so practica...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AN AERIAL SHEPHERD. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

AN AERIAL SHEPHERD. The gallant little Republic of Ven ezuela boasts of a remarkable bird which can be trained to. tend flocks. Not only does the yak-a-milk, as it is called, take the place of the sheep dog, but it is frequently used to guard the home of its owner. When the Indians capture a yak-a milk they find little difficulty in training it to domestic use. It is at tached to the farmyard, and performs the same duties as a faithful watch dog. A yak-a-milk soon learns to know and obey the voice of its mas ter. Its usual gait is slow and se date, but sometimes it will execute most eccentric movements, waltzing and pironetting in a very absurd fashion. Instances are recorded where these strange birds have defendcd their charges from attacks of wild and savage animals, and even driven them off.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LIONS FEAR MICE. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

LIONS FEAR MICE. Large beasts of prey have a very strong antipathy to rate and mice. When a mouse was thrown into a cage where there were two lions the animals leaped away, roaring, ap parently with fright, and making e[ forts to get away from the tiny crea ture. A tiger roared with rage when first introdueed to a mouse. Then he lowered his muzzle to smell at it, but would have no more to do with it, and made violent efforts to break from his cage. Elephants screamed and trumpeted when mice were introduced, shrinking from them as far as the chains allow ed. One elephant, however, more knowing than the rest, when a couple 6f mice were placed on the ground be fore him, quietly placed his foot on them.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GAS WORKS DESTROY NATURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

GAS WORKS DESTROY NATURE. From an investigation of the poi soning of park vegetation near gas works, it appears that the chloro phyll (the green element in leaves, etc.) is affected, and gradually 'disap pears. With the soil charged with gas, asphyxiation, through lack of oxygen' in the roots, checks asesimila tIon and the formation of new sub stance in the plant cells. The first change to be noted is a drying of the edges of the leaves. On large leaves, transparent spots spreading rapidly often indicate gas-poisoning. FaUlling of the leaves is a symptom in plants of rapid growth, like fuchsia, begonia and azalea; root swellings, from ex cess of water, occur in yews and trees of some other kinds.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RABBIT SKINS FOR SHOEING CHILDREN. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

RABBIT SKINS FOR SHOEING CHILDREN. According co the "Deutsche Tages zeitung" systematic experiments in working rabbit skins have proved tne high value of the leather produced. It has been found suitable for light footwear, and in a larger degree for different sorts of leather goods, such as hand bags, purses, toilet articles, frames, etc. It is not a difficult thing to treat and tan rabbit skins. An amateur can make a good job of it. They would make excellent moc casins for country .- children; and a friend of ours who wore them on a Mexican ranch says that for wear and comfort they beat all other foot wear.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SONG OF THE WELSH. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

SONG OF THE WELSH. The Welsh troops are always sing ing when they are not fighting or training (writes Mr. Philip Gibbs.) Each company has its own glee party and in the woods and flelds behind the battle-line they sing the old songs of Wal's and the old hymn tunes and ballad:, with heaitlful harmonies. The enemy mlust hear them some times, and German sentries, standing in the trenches, must listen to the Welshmen's voices stealing across No Man's i.and from support trenches or waggon lines. It was in a wood as green and -beautiful as the old For est of Arden that I met some of these Welsh troops, anrd they were singing then, though not a day pas ses without a few heavy bshells crash ing between the branches here. Old Farmer (to -oldier son "Just re turned from the Front): "Well, Dick, what be these tranks lilce that there's eo much talk about ?" Son: "Why, they're jumt wolbling thingamabobe, full o' what-you-may call-'ems, and they blaze away like billyo !" Old Farmer : "Aye, I hear...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
UNEXPLORED QUEBEC. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

T~INEXPLORED QUEBEC. In the north of the province of Quebec there are still 253,000 square miles of unexplored country, making with the 642,000 square miles in Wes tern Canada, a total of 901,000 square miles. In other words it can be stated that 28 per cent. of Canada is still unexplored. In the basin of the River Mackienzie are to be found, it is believed, the greatest petroleum wells in the world. Savages have seen some lakee at the Yukon, from 60 to 70 miles long, that have not been seen by white men. The Mac kenzie mountains no one, not even the Indians, knows anything of. It must he many years before the mys tery of.the north of Canada is clear ed for cartography. Fortunes await the enterprising explorer.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BEAUTIES WITH GOLDEN TEETH. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

BEAUTIES WITH GOLDEN TEETH. -------+------ It is amazing how ideas of beauty vary with latitude and longitude. In Japan, the professlolial beauty loves to appear with golden teeth; in In dia she prefers them stained red, but in certain parts of Sumatra no lady who respected herself would conde send to have any front teeth at all. They are removed the moment they appear, and strictly suppressed if they should try again. In Persia. anything but an aquiline Lose is "off." Even quite a decent snub-nose is well out of it. But in Uganda a lady is. chfelly sought on account of her india-rubber nose. In Japan it must be "tip-tilted." have a heavenly direction, and in Britain any sort of old nose will pass so long as it is not everlastingly pok ing itself into other people's busi ness. In Eastern cotntries red hair and warts are in the same category; but coming West as far as Constantino pie, where red hair is very uncomon, we find it just as greatly admired, and henna used to make it red if...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BREAD FREE FROM MOULD. HOW TO PREPARE IT. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

BREAD FREE FROM MOULD. e HOW TO PREPARE IT. Numbers of housekeepers are much troubled by the bad-keeping quality of war bread. It is difficult to prac tice economy by saving and eating stale bread because mould soon ap pears. Professor Fleurent, of the Conser vatoire Nationale des Arts et Meti era, -has lately advised a process by which bread intended for prisoners can be made .to last a month or more. This process will only be of use to people who make their own bread, but during hot weather it will doubtless prove an advantage to bake a batch that will last longer than does the usual baking. The dough is prepared in the ordi nary manner. For the "rising" it is placed in pans of oblong shape, and when ready to be baked the surface should be smooth and free from cracks. Each loaf should weigh not mnore than 2lb. The baking should be rather prolonged, the better to ensure perfect sterilisation. On leav lng the oven, each loaf, while still hot, is- wrapped in two sheets of stout paper...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Pakenham Upper. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

Pakenham Upper. The meeting held at Mr Everist's on Saturday last, to discuss the matter of the removal of the telephone line from Pakenham Upper to Gembrook, and re-erecting it from Pakenham Upper to Pakenham, via Toomuc, was - poorly attended and practically no business was done. The Department has written acquainting residents with the fact that if they do not come to terms before a certain date they (the department) will commence dismantling the line. Another meeting will   be held at Pakenham Upper hall on Saturday, December Ist, to finally discuss the matter.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
No Title [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 23 November 1917

The fruit-growers of Upper Bea consfield have decided to build a large packing shed, covering an area of 100 feet by 50 feet. A meeting is to be held this week to decide where the shed shall be erected. Some favor North Beaconsfield, others desire it to be built at Upper Beaconsfield, but the majority favor its erection near Beaconsfield railway station, and it is probable that this site will be ultim ately decided upon. Flower Day in connection with the Nar Nar Goon State school will be celeborated this evening, when a sale of gifts will be held to secure pat riotic funds. Messrs Keast, Morris and Miles are to conduct a property sale at Cardinia Hotel, Beaconsfield, on the 8th of next month, when they will offer Mr Lee's orchard and homestead. - The annual meeting of the Paken ham branch of the Red Cross Society is to be held on the 5th of next month, when the president (Mrs Arthur Green wood) and the secretary (Miss C. Hagens) will furnish reports 'of the work done during, the pas...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SOME BLESSINGS OF WAR. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 30 November 1917

SOME BLESSINGS OF WAR. That "ational decay" had set in for many years before the war is undeniable. Nationally, our teeth, or our hair, our ecyes were "going"' V'; were becoming a toothless bald-head ed, be-spectacled race. Five years of ;war-bread-peace will not bring the old white bread back-will, owing to the greater mastication that its in gredients and its staleness requires, save the teeth of thousands of the younger generation. Our eyesight, as opticians have already noticed, is much better. The day strain of work, added to the brilliant street lighting, ruined the eyesight of thousands. N-ow the darkened street, and the shaded lighting indoors, has done wonders for the eyes. Dyspepsia, too has b'cen killed by restricted means, and greater exercise. Gardening, al lotment digging, V.T.C. drilling, and the like, have brought new health to multitudes. And as the retention of our hair is in no small degree atten dant on our general health, premat ure baldness is arrested. There a...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x