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Title: Dunmunkle Standard Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,667 items from Dunmunkle Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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ELECTION DAY. TO-MORROW. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 4 September 1914

ELECTION DAY. TO-MORROW. Saturday will he e'eciron d >y. Polling booths will be established wherever the number or convenitnce of electors de mands them. The hours of polling will be from S o'clock in the morning to 8 o'clock at night. With such facilities for voting every elector should record his or her vote on Saturday. It is a national duly. The method of voting is- by placing a cross in the square in front of the name of the candidate it is desiied shall be elected. The following are the Victorian candidates for the House of Represen tatives, tho names of Liberals being printed in small capitals :— U'lluclnva—Gurtin, J. J. A. Watt. \V. A. B.ilknit—GVtDiUJi. F. li. M'Griith, D. 0. Bendigo—Arthur, J. A. Kobb, A. F. M. Bourke—AusU-y, F. Jennings, R. M. Coranganiite—Burke. T. M. Manifold, J. C* Corio—Kendell, W. Ozinne, A. T. EcJiuca—Gonrley, J. CL Pai.mek, A. C. Fawkner--G'AKSK, F. S. ILtnnnn, -J. F. • Flinders—Irvine, W. ir. M'Dnuirjill. J. K- -■ Gippsland—Bknn'et, J. • ; Wise...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Royal Red Cross. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 4 September 1914

The Royal Red Cross. —4 The institution, on St. George's Day, 18S3, of the Royal Red Cross, an exclusively feminine decoration, was one of Queen Victoria's hap piest inspirations to associate the ( patron saint of England and all that stands for chivalry and cour age with a distinction for women who hid manifested special devo tion in nursing the sailor or the soldier in peace or war. That, at least, was its original purpose. In the original statutes the form of decoration "to bo styled and de signated the Royal Red Cross" wna officially approved. Then, as now, it consisted of "a cross enamelled crimson, edged with gold, having ' on the arms thereof the words Faith, Hope, and Charity, with tlio elate of the institution, the centre having thereon Our ElHgy. On the reverse side Our Royal and Im perial Cypher and Crown shall be shown in relief." It was further laid down that it might be worn by the Queen Regnant, the Queen Consort, or the Queen Dowager of the United Kingdom, and that i...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Ladies' Column. AN APPLIQUE CUSHION COVER. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 4 September 1914

Ladies' Column. 1 AN APPLIQUE CUSHION COVEll. ■ There is something very fascinating about applique work, And it- is very effective for cosies, cushion covers, etc., and it entails much loss la bour than elaborate..-:,embroidery, and often, gives as go6d, ,or better, results. A dainty cushion cover adorned with applique work is shown in the accompnaying illustration, and the design can be quite easily worked from our sketch. The cover itself is made of pale green soft silk, ..nd should measure about cighteon in ches each way, without reckoning the hemstitched frill, which sl'.oind be about three or four inches in width. I The velvet, applique' is of a darlo green colour; and is cut out in the shape shown by Diagram A, on the right of the sketch, and edged j with a dull shade of old gold gal [ loon, a colour which' always looks so well on a background of green. I The cover at the back is made to faster! after the manner cf an ordinary pillow-slip, with a flap and throe buttons and but...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A BALLAD. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 4 September 1914

A BALLAD.! •f .' ' *'You are old, Father William," the young man aaid, "And your hair has become very white ; And yet you incessantly stand on your head— Do you think, at your age, it is right ?"• ''In my youth," Father William re-1 plied to his son, "I feared it might injure the brain; But now that I'm perfectly sure I have none, Wh>\ I do it again and again." "You are old," said the youth, " as I mentioned before. And have grown most uncommonly fat ; Vet you turned a ba,ck-somersault in at the door— Pray, what is the reason of that ?" "In my 3'out-h," said the sage, as ho shook his grey locks, "I kept all my limbs very supple By the use of this ointment—one shilling the box Allow me to soil you a couple ?" "You are old," said the youth, "and your jaws are too weak For anything tougher than suet; Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak— Pray, how did you manage to do it ?"• "Jn my youth," said his father, "I took to the law. And argued each case with my wife ; .A...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Great Anti-Fly Campaign. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 4 September 1914

Great Anti-Fly Campaign. —i—. *... .... A few months ago the' Sunday Times' offered a prize of £10 to the resident of Johannesburg sending the greatest, number of dead flies to the Municipal Health Ofilco within a period of three months. The second prize was £5, third £2 10s., and and twenty-five prizes of 10s. each to the competitors sending Uis next highest numbers. The result has just been declared, the winner having 8,008,490 flies to his credit, the second prize-win ner 5,914,500, and the third 4,710, 400. The total number of files killed was 61,943,300, and this number is vouched for by the Health De partment of the Johannesburg Muni cipality, who did the counting. Since it has been proved by scien tists that a single fly is capable of having descendants numbering 1, 096,181,249,310,720,000,000,000,000 in a period of six months, it fol lows that the 61,943,300 flies killed in the ' Sunday Times' competition might, before the cold weather set in, have produced the stupendous to...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ART'S BRUTALITY. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 4 September 1914

ART'S BRUTALITY.. fr *'I know Amos comes in i'or a lot of praise because he hunts with a camera, instead of a gun," Forbes began in a slightly acrid tone. "It never seems to strike people that there may be more than one kind of brutality. "What's the matter with Ames ?" demanded one of-his clubmates. The Meanings of some of the New Air Terms illus trated— (A) A " Volplane." (B) A " Nose Dive,." (C) A Pancake." / (D) A " Slide Slip." "Out in Canada last autumn," Forbes resumed, "I went of! by my self one day, when Ames was fid dling over his kodak, and I stum bled full' on a black bear. Be cause I was the only thing in sight, very likely, I became the immediate object of her attentions. I had only a slight lead, but I was go: ing pretty well when Ames poked through the brush and took in the situation. " 'Hold on there, old chap !' he yelled. 'You're too far ahead. I can't get you both in.' "

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HIS CHOICE. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 4 September 1914

HIS CHOICE. Cholly : "Shall we go to the East End Theatre and take a look at the ' Great Unwashed ?' " Algy : "No; let us go to the Opera and see the ' Great Undress ed.' '*

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 4 September 1914

The approximate number of cows and heifers in the United Kingdom is about 4,100,000, and the average yield about 420 gallons per cow. A simple method of estimating ap proximately the amount of cheese which may be made from a given quantity of milk, is to ascertain the fat test of the milk, multiply it by the number of pounds of milk and di vide by 100, thereby obtaining the number of pounds of butter-fat avail able for cheese-making. Multiply the result by 2.6, and the quantity of cheese manufactured will be shown. Example : 307 lbs. of milk ; 3.8 fat test ; 307 multiplied by 3.8, divided by 100, multiplied by 2.6 equals 30.3 lbs. of cheese. Africa is three times larger than Europe. Many birds form their sounds with out opening their bills. I'Ee pigeon is a well-known instance of this, Mrs. Robinson : "And jou went up the Rhine ?" Mrs. de Jones : "I should think so. We went right to the very top. What a splendid view there is from the summit." 1944.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOUSEHOLD HINTS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 4 September 1914

HOUSEHOLD HINTS. When threading a needle take a while envelope, slide tho needle through, and draw it down until the eye is visible, and you will thread the needle like magic. The white surface of the paper sets the eye into relief, as if,it were magni fied. If kerosene and water be put into a sprinkling pot, and all outhouses dustpans, etc., places where flies breed and increase in thousands, be sprinkled carefully with the mixture occasionally during the summer months, the eggs will be destroyed, and tho household bo spared an in tolerable nuisance and a real dan ger. A good way to uso up coal dust is to save all paper bags, fill them with the dust, and when the fire re quires mending place a bag of the dust on it, with a few pieces of coal on top. This plan is much cleaner than putting on the dust in shovelfuls, as it cakes, and so does not tumble through the bars of the grate on to the hearth. To improve the flavour of currants and sultanas which are to be used for cakes, place ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FARM SEPARATOR. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 4 September 1914

THE FARM SEPARATOR. The farm separator has come to stay, consequently the conditions un der which the machine does its clean est work should b6 understood. liven temperature and even speed, are imperative if we would do the best work. Separators should be checkcil occasionally in their work so as to guard against a loss of fat. Formerly an average loss of .12 to .15 fat left in skim-milk was consid ered fairly good. At the present time a loss of over .5 is thought bad. It pays to watch closely, the separator. It must be borne in mind thrit a slight loss in skimming reaches a prodigious amount in the course of a year. There is no machine used on the farm as much as the hand separator; hence, the importance of securing a good one and keeping it in the best of order. Separate the cream from the milk at a consistency producing approxi mately about ten gallons of cream from every hundred gallons of milk. Cool the cream immediately after the separation. Tanks of cold water are ordinarily ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The New Language of the Air. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 4 September 1914

The New Language of the Air. T A new and very picluresquo lan i guago is being coined from Eng ] lish and French words and odd bits of slang, to describe the various activities of the airmen and the draft in which they navigate the air. A "seaplane," "water-plane," "hy droplnnj," or "water 'bus," to give it a few of its names, is a flying machine fitted with floats so that it can rise from and return to the water. To "taxi" means to dash along the surface until tho speed is suffi cient to rise. The "pusher" is a biplane with the propellor behind the planes. To "stall" a machine is bad amidship, and means that the machine is dri ven skyward at too steep an angle so that it flies tail downwards and loses its balance, which may end in a bad sideslip. . The " bat " boat is a biplane with a boat shaped body instead of floats. A "nose dive" is a sheer drop often caused by nn accident to a portion of the "machine, usually ending in a fatal smash. To "climb" is to rise at the correct angle ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XXIV. A TERRIBLE PUNISHMENT. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 4 September 1914

OWAPTER XXIV. A TERRIBLE PUNISHMENT. Therese lifted the bedclothes and searched carefully for the paper, then 8he felt between the bed and the mattress, she examined the drawers, finally she was forced to the conclu sion that in her disturbed state her grandmother had hidden . it in the bureau, but she dare not linger, as ehe heard Eliza coming upstairs. "Your breakfast, is ready,- miss. Cook's just gone upstairs to get a paper the mistress gave her last night," said the girl. "A paper my grandmother gave her ?" Just , then Phoebe appeared, hold ing in her hand a long parchment envelope. "Yes, Miss Therese, your grand mother . came to the kitchen just be fore we went to bed last night, and she says, 'Phoebe, you're lived with me a long time and I know I can trust you, so I'm going to give this into your care ;' and she hands me the envelope. Then she went on. 'I've an idea I shall die suddenly, and I want you to promise me that when I am dead you will open this enve lope and follow ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TUBERCULOSIS BACILLI AND SUNLIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 4 September 1914

TUBERCULOSIS BACILLI AND SUNLIGHT. Investigations recently completed at one of the State Universities showed that the bacilli of tuberculosis will remain alive and virulent outside the bodj of a living animal for months. In. the droppings of tuberculous cat tle they lived for more than two months ; in butter in cold storage, for ten months ; and in the tissues : of a dead guinea pig, in water, for nearly a year. I It is evident that a tuberculous animal, either alive or dead, is a menace unless intelligently handled and disposed of. There is one thing,, however, that is certain death to these devastating and well-nigh in vincible little germs, and that is abundant sunlight, which makes short work of them. Farmers who sneer at scientific agriculture, up-to-date me thods, anVl convenient, sanitary buildings as mere fads that cannot profitable be followed by the man who depends upon his farming opera tions for his living, will perhaps he able to see, in the light of these dis closures,...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XXIII. PAYING THE PENALTY. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 4 September 1914

CHAPTER XXIII. PAYING THE PENALTY. "You must be mad ! Why should I pay the penalty when you went scot free ?" exclaimed Theresa, angrily. "Listen, Theresa ! My crime Was not as bad as yours. I struck in pas sion and fierce indignation ; you kill ed a man deliberately and of set purpose." "Yes, and I would do it as*ia," said the girl. "You don't know all. He had promised to make m« lii« wife, and"—— she added, then stop ped, abruptly. "I know and suspect a great deal, and I blame myself for not looking after you better. You hare the hot, fierce blood of my race, mine was like water to yours. But there is an other and a great difference, which makos it incumbent that the truth should be known. My crime was never laid on any one else. The po lice were baffled, save the man Short, 1 hut he could not get beyond suspi cion ; but Jack Carvill has been tried and condemned for what you did, or I should not have spoken. Therese, you cannot let an innocent man suffer for what you have done." T...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.) THE MESHES OF FATE. OR, THE CURSE OF THE BLUB DIAMONDS. PART 12. CHAPTER XXII. THE PAST REVEALED. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 4 September 1914

(ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.)' meshesIf":ate. o R, THE CURSE OF THE BLUB DIAMONDS. f ,-;By Hedley Richards, Authof of "Thf •Mine Master's Heir," "Time, the Avengsr," etc., etc. PART 12. CHAPTER xxrr. THE PAST REVEALED. The evening sun poured In at the . drawing-room windows of The Cot tags. Mrs. Morris was seated a little in the shade with her eyea fixed on Therese, who was looking moodily out of the window. They had dined, or, rather, they had made a pretence of it, neither of them having had any, appetite. Since they had entered the drawing room perfect silence had reigned—the girl absorbed in her thoughts and the older woman studying her atten tive^ . "Therese, shut both the windows." Her words were spoken in a quick, commanding tone, and the girl look ed up with a start. "Wfoy should I shut them ? The night is very hot," she answered. "Shut the windows !" ] Something in her grandmother's I tone made Therese do as she was told ; then Mrs. Morris moved her chair close to her granddaughte...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XXVI. THE DAWN OF HAPPINESS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

CHAPTER XXVI. THE DAWN OF HAPPINESS. "Laurie, I had a very queer dream last night about your father," said Sir Leonard Hatton to his nephew. They were at the breakfast-table, and the butler, having attended to their wants, had retired,s,as Sir Leo nard preferred the morning meal to be informal. It was the time when he was least reserved, but it was not often that he spoke of the brother with whom he had quarrelled many years ago, and Laurie looked at Iftm in surprise. "What did you dream ?" he asked. For a moment his uncle did not re ply, then he said : "I dreamed that your father came into the room and said : 'It's time Laurie had those diamonds. They are i worth a fortune.' " 'Where are tbej ?' I asked ; and he replied : " 'Let him have his own way, and he'll get them.' Then I awoke, but the impression left upon me was so vivid that I could have imagined: your father had really been speak-: ing to me." "Do you think- it possible he is living ?" asked Laurie. "No. I heard many year...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHITEWASHING. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

WHITEWASHING. -4 Since the law in some parts of the country demands it, and as sanitary i science says it is a good thing in the ! interest of the health of the herd, ' and the wholesomeness of the pro , duct, whitewashing of cow stables ! and other premises about the dairy : has bccome an annual d-'.ty amon? ! our good dairymen. Yv'c admit that it j is a disagreeable job, this handling I of lime, wielding the old-fashioned j whitewash "brush, which must be poked into innumerable corners and | over rough surfaces in order to make a good job, and dodging the spla«h . ing fluid, and especially so when those engaged in milking must dn , the work, as their hands are invari ' ably tender and therefore attacked by lime. The handling of whitewash with a brush is not only disagreeable but it is somewhat expensive, and this accounts very often for the tar diness of some dairymen to do their whitewashing. j There is one easy way to get ' around this difficulty, and that is by means of a spray...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHEESE EXPERIMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

I ...... ! CHEESE EXPERIMENTS. | I should like to call attention to some cheese experiments which have recently been carried out at the Kil marnock Dairy School on the mak ; ing of cheese from different qualities of milk (writes Mr. Primrose Mc , Connell in the "Dairy" London). The experiments were for the purpose of testing what proportion of cheese could be got from milk containing j varying quantities of cream, and it was found, as one would naturally expect it to be found, that the whole milk fairly rich in fat gave very much more cheese than that from | which some fat had been extracted, varjir.g down until the lowest was ' obtained, from sMm-milk. j It was found, apart from this, ■ however, that; the cheese of the high i est proportion of fat also held a : fairly large proportion of water, and that in the case of the skim-milk cheese less water was held, or it dried up very quickly. Thus it sim ply exemplified the old saying about j "requiring an axe to cut a ekim-milk I chees...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

Young, snakes are born with fangs • and poison-glands in full, perfection, and are dangerous even before tast [jng food. IMS.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 11 September 1914

I The northern districts of Italy are celebrated for their dairy produce ; it I is from here the celebrated Gorgon | zola cheese comes, as well as the ■ Parmesan and Pecorino cheeses. In j 1910 £2,320,000 worth of cheece (chiefly Pecorino) was exported. Dur j ing that year -£1,636,000 worth of eggs were exported to the United Kingdom, Germany and Switzerland. Swine and poultrj are an important adjunct on every farm. Co-operative dairy companies are in existence, working on modern lines. ■ To remove smoke marks from ceil ings, mix a thick paste of starch and water, and with a clean flannel spread it over the mark. Allow to g«t , thoroughk dry, then brush of! with a soft brush and the marlis will have disappeared. Before sweeping the carpets take an old round tin, pierce holes in the bottom, and fill with common salt. ' Sprinkle this over the carpet. It prevents the dust from rising, the colours are made bright, and moths are tostot awjur. 1945,

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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