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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

The Indian, Advocate. 205 Jones was seen the next week and gladly made the arrange ments necessary, although Mentz felt a slight regret as he looked at the neat clover patch no longer his own. "Pshaw I I'd do more than that for a boy like him. He's got great brain power and he'll be famous yet." Sheridan's first year at college passed uneventfully enough, and he felt an inclination to smile at the "show," as he called it, of the morning services in the chapel. Mentz showed his son's letters to every calling neighbor, with various proud ex clamations oyer his improved handwriting. "He's powerful smart, that's certain," his mother would beam to her friends as she smoothed her apron over her knees. "Father 's goin' to make a congressman out o' him, he says. Sheridan's mighty bright, if I do say it myself." There was no sign of Catholic influence over the young man when he came home for his vacation, unless one might take into consideration a more manly deportment, together with a desir...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

206 The Indian Advocate. fancy a slender, pale girl whom he had protected in a rough but kind fashion. He tried to recall the old feeling, but his mind was with his books, and the monks in their sombre dress seemed to come between his thoughts of her and his own consciousness. 'Matilda has forgotten me, I have no doubt. If she's been as busy with her books as I have been with mine, she cannot recall the color of my eyes. I know I can't think of her at all correctly." ' "She's not pretty," Mrs. Mentz said, "but she's right peart on foot, and she's of high standin' in the church. She's alius askin' after you, and it haint like a Mentz, or a Luckett either, to be fickle." "Hush, hush!" said farmer Mentz. "I don't want Sherry tied down with woman's notions. A pretty congressman's wife Matilly 'd make." "I'm only seventeen, and I think a little time can pass be fore I become a married man," Sheridan remarked decisively. The next term came and Sheridan's letters were more pol ished, more ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

. The Indian Advocate. 207 whose quiet voice and kindness won the hearts of all his pupils. "I am a convert," he told them one day when some slighting remark was' made of the Church. "I remember I used to say many of these words you are saying." This im pressed Sheridan often after. One day his father wrote him a letter, in which, after speaking of his mother, the good old farmer, full of his subject, wrote: "I went to Bland's the day before yesterday and I met Blank, who is the nominee for Congress. He said that good political timber was about used, up; what we needed now was a younger man who could make a speech equal to Clay or Webster. Now, I want you to turn your attention toward this subject. Now's your chance. During the next ten years a man must come forward equal to shouldering our good old party, or it is gone to the wall for want of a color-bearer; you can do it; so work for this if you want to please your old father." Sheridan read this with knotted brows. Day by day the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

208 The Indian Advocate. sermon in Bellfount. Perhaps such a crowd never filled old St. Ann's as sat under the young father's eyes that day. Nearly all the older faces had watched him as a boy, and the younger ones had been his playmates. Whether it was that his speech was eloquent, or that his heart was earnest, it was certain that he showed his audience some truths that day out of the common for them to hear, and caused many to carry away a feeling of the daily crucifixion of Our Saviour. Farmer Mentz felt an awe of his son, but occasionally approached something of the old love when he heard of his successes here and there. But his despair reached its climax when his son went into the yellow fever districts during the great epidemic. A solace it certainly was, he said, when neighbor after neighbor stopped to ask after the boy; and when the strain was over and his son was still alive and loved, it was good to hear him say to a new-comer, "Yes, I knew you'd heard of him; that's my s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

209 !THE Indian advocate The Indian Advocate T A t tt Published by the Benedictine Fathers of H J I ft SACKED HEART MISSION. OKLAHOMA, jf 1 A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by our Regular Superior. TISRMH OF1 SUBSOniPTIONl Single Copies 15c. Annual $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign $1.25. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma. rniviLEGESi ' v 1. Every Subscriber and Benefactor will participate :n all the merits prayers and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 3. A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers nnd Benefactors. 4. Ever' year, in the month of September, two Solemn Masses are sung for our Bene factors, one for the Living ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

210 The Indian Advocate. A man who cannot forgive, breaks the bridge over which he might pass to Heaven. " Nature invites the beautiful and the useful; hence, hand some is that handsome does. Indulging in dangerous pleasures is like licking honey from a knife and cutting the tongue with the edge. - Thinking leads man to knowledge. He may see and hear, and read and learn, whatever he pleases; he will never know anything of it, except that which he has thought over; that which by thinking, he has made the property of his mind. Is it then saying too much, that man by thinking only, be comes truly man? Take away thought from man's life, and what remains? About 300,000 acres of land of the Rosebud Indians, in South Dakota, were recently purchased by act of Congress, the law providing that the territory should be prepared for settlement by the Department of the Interior. Secretary Hitchcock, in making arrangements to open up the land, has decided to follow the plan that was operated so su...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

The Indian Advocate. 211 to Jesus." That's hypocrisy deeper than helll Unless those meddling preachers are given to understand by this govern ment that they are out of order, this unchecked abuse is apt to "play the role of Warwick" in the coming election. In Brazil, the newly-revived congregration of the Bene dictines makes steady progress under the able and zealous administration of Abbot von Caloen. The Holy Father has lately committed to it the duty of evangelizing the native Indian tribes which in some parts of those vast provinces still remain pagan. To supply monks for the Brazilian con gregation, and particularly for this mission work, a monastery is being established in Belgium. The old abbey of St. An-drew-les-Bruges, founded in the year 1100 by Count Robert of Flanders on his return from the first crusade, was de stroyed, with other Flemish monasteries, during the French Revolution. TJie Benedictines have re-acquired the prop erty and are now building a fine monastery, gr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

212 The Indian Advocate. rejected the vote. One thing is plain, however, the German people, speaking through their representatives, are not op posed to the Jesuits. It is also plain that He who promised to abide with His Church for all ages has not forgotten His word. - If one could but count the drops of blood our Savior shed during His passion! And why? Because every drop was of priceless value; each particular one could have redeemed a world. And yet so lightly do we consider the momentous truths of Redemption, so seldom do we reflect on the infinite merit of every trifling detail in that grand scheme of Salva tion, that our souls become crystallized, one may say, in their own indifference. Drop by drop it flowed. The Garden was bedewed with it. From the hall of Pilate to the height of Calvary; from the crown of thorns to the dull thud of the cruel nails; from the sweat of Gethsemane to the sword thrust after all was over, it arose, a cry of sacrifice, a clean oblation whose holo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

The Indian Advocate. 213 been fruitless; that perhaps many a soul, through our inter cession, will have taken its place before the throne, clad in garments made white and shining in the stream of the Pre cious Blood! The citizens of America celebrate that day which gave birth to their liberties. The recollection of this event, re plete with consequences so beneficial to mankind, swells every heart with joy and fills every tongue with praise. We celebrate, not the sanguinary exploits of a tyrant to subjugate and enslave millions of his fellow-creatures; we celebrate neither the birth nor the coronation of that phantom styled a king; but the resurrection of liberty, the emancipation of mankind, the regeneration of the world. These are the sources of our joy; these are the causes of our triumph. We pay no homage at the tomb of kings; to sublime our feelings we trace no line of illustrious ancestors; to support our dig nity we recur to no usages sanctioned by the authority of the great ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

214 The Indian Advocate. NonCatholic Tribute to Our Indian Schools, n ECENTLY before the Newman Club, in Los Rl Angeles, Cal., Charles F. Lummis, a New I -n. ij. j j j 4. r .: f J2ngiauuer auu a. uebueuuaui ui gcuciauuiio ux Methodists, delivered a lecture in which he told what he knows about Catholic Indian schools. Here is some of his plain talk: "I presume you all know that I am talking to you as Americans, and not as Catholics. I have, I feel, the right to talk as an American. I want to say I do not believe the time has yet come for Catholics to be jumped on with spike- nailed shoes because they are Catholics. You doubtless know that for something like a dozen years there has been a great cry raised in regard to 'sectarian education' of Indians. In plain language, the fight has been to wipe out the Catholic contract Indian schools. 'If it is fair to leave out the Presbyterians and Methodists, it is also fair to leave out the Catholics,' said the sly politicians. The simple fact ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

The Indian Advocate. 215 known them for a long time, and in boyhood I thought they were terrible; but I have seen them when the black" 'vomito' raged in the tropics, and mothers and fathers fled away from their own children, and people fell in the streets, and those daughters of God picking up the deserted dead and dying. And I have felt their tender mercy myself; and when a man comes to me and says that a child or a dog had better be taught by a politician who is rewarded by a place in a Government Indian school than by a Sister of" Charity, he wants to bring his fire-escape with him, that's all. And it seems to me that any American, not to say any Catholic American, could not better employ part of his money than in aiding the support of the In dian schools conducted by these noble and unselfish women, now frowned upon and even actively antagonized by the partisan spirit of our politicians." It would be interesting to hear what the men who have been fighting against our Indian scho...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

216 The Indian Advocate. their independence, but not their freedom. By the document which closed the bloody struggle they secure all the advan tage of the situation. A free grant of fifteen million dollars and liberal loans to restore their farms; all Boers outside their country will be returned at British expense; the Dutch language to be taught and used in the courts and their arms are to be retained. Such are the terms. By them the waste of war may soon be made to disappear at the skillful touch of Boer husbandry. The fields of the Transvaal will soon again respond to their cultivation. Towns and villages will again arise. The exiles will again go back to their homes. No, not to their homes, but to their memories, for in each there must be vacant places. The thoughts then engendered will largely influence the future. Who knows what that is to be? The Boer peo ple will now realize for the first time what a priceless boon is perfect freedom. They are no longer a free people, but su...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

217 tt The Indian Advocate j j History of the Kiowas, j I $ j From the Report of the Bureau of Ethnology. $fc j -. 4 Continued from the June Number. HILR thft Kiowa still nrrnnipH thp "Rlnr.k Hills Wm their nearest neighbors toward the south were the uomancnes, wnose language and traditions snow them to be a comparatively recent offshoot from the Shoshoni, of Wyoming, and whose war par ties formerly ranged from Platte river to central Mexico. In 1724 Bourgmont describes them, un der the name of Padouca, as located between the headwaters of Platte and Kansas rivers. Like the other prairie tribes, they drifted steadily south ward, and about the middle of last century were established chiefly about the upper Arkansas and its principal tributaries. Long before this time, however, the Penateka division had separated from the main body and gone down into Texas. Padouca, the name Used by Bourgmont, is one form of the name by which the Comanche are known to the Osage, Da kota and related tr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

218 The Indian Advocate. pened that a small party of Kiowa on a friendly visit to a Spanish settlement southwestward from that river perhaps Las Vegas, or possibly Santa Fe stopped to rest at a house, which they particularly state was not a fort or trading post. The house was a large one with several rooms, and by a curious coincidence a party of Comanche had arrived shortly before and were then talking in the next room, all unaware of the near presence of their enemies. Hearing the voices and recognizing the language, the Kiowa at once prepared for battle, and another bloody encounter was about to be added to the long list, when their Mexican host, friendly to both sides, interposed and represented to the Kiowa that now was their opportunity to establish a lasting peace with their foes, offering his own services as mediator. After some debate the Kiowa accepted his proposition, and the kindly Mexican, going into the next room, informed the astonished Comanche that a party of their ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

v Tun Indian Advocate. 219 do not find me here, know that I am dead, and avenge my death." He then dismissed them, and the Kiowa started homeward, while he, with the captive and one or two Mexi cans, accompanied the Comanche to their camps on the Double Mountain fork of the Brazos, in Texas. On arriving there with his escort, the Comanche were at first disposed to regard him as an enemy, and made a show of preparing to revenge upon him the losses they had suffered at the hands of his people, but finding that he was a brave man and not to be easily frightened, they changed their purpose and gave him a friendly welcome. He remained with them all summer, being well entertained by them on the hunt and at their social gatherings, and when at last the leaves began to turn, the tipis were taken down and the whole band, having long ago decided on peace, moved off to meet the Kiowa at the appointed rendezvous. They had not long to wait (for Indians observe the seasons' changes closely) befor...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

220 The Indian Advocate. European alliances have endured as long. The Penateka Comanche, who lived far down in Texas, were not included in this compact, and had very little connection even with the northern bands of their own people until brought together under the reservation system. Immediately after the treaty the Kiowa began to move down and make their camps along and south of the Arkansas, which, until that time, had been considered the northern boundary of the Comanche country and the southern limit of the Kiowa range. In the territory which they thenceforth held in common the Kiowa usually made their home camps more to the northwest, about the Arkansas, while the Comanche kept near to the Staked Plains and the Texas frontier. Strengthened by their alliance for war and defense, the confederated tribes were able to make a successful stand behind the Arkansas against further invasion from the north. The raids of the Kiowa on the Mexican settlements, hitherto desultory and ineffe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

The Indian Advocate. 221 hfJJTfr4r tMbtHbtS LOCALS A new bell was blessed at El Reno, June 4. Rev. Fr. Ildephonse, O. S. B., formerly of Langston, Okla., is now permanently settled in the Abbey. Rev. Fr. Van Ree (now Fr. Benedict) entered our novitiate on the Feast of the Sacred Heart. Congratulations. At last the passenger has reached Asher. Let us hope that it will bring many new settlers to our neighbor town. The venerable jubilarian, Dom. Suitbert Breiken, O. S. B., cele brated his 83d birthday June 13th. Ad multos annos. June 2, Mrs. Charles View, nee M. Bourbonnais, a Pottawattomie Indian, died of consumption. Rev. Fr. Leo buried her on the 4th. R. I. P. The new church of Geary, Okla., a mission attended by Rev. Fr. Constantine, O. S. B., of El Reno, was solemnly blessed by our Bishop, June 6th. Rev. Fr. Hildebrand Zoeller, O. S. B., was raised to the sublime dignity of the Priesthood, June 15, by Rt. Rev. Trobec, Bishop of St. Cloud, Minn. As we go to press, preparations.are ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

222 The Indian Advocate. All the young Fathers and Brothers are employed in the field, har vesting, gathering fruits, digging potatoes, threshing wheat and making hay. They are, indeed, according to our holy rule, "true monks, living by the labor of their hands, according to the example of the Apostles and their forefathers Peg. XLVIII. In this issue we give the catalogue of the students who attended our school during the scholastic year 1901-02; also the names of those among them who were awarded premiums. As a whole, our students did remarka bly well this year. It is true, there were some drones among them, but these were the exceptions, conspicuous only by their laziness, whereas the bulk of the students were industrious and hard-working lads, who can com pete with any scholars of the Territory, and even of the States, thanks to their zealous teachers, whose modesty might blush had we the hardihood to pen their names. Nor must the pupils of St. Mary's Academy be for gotten. The g...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

The Indian Advocate. 223 Leclair, D Linskey, T Martell, G McDole, M McEvers, C McEvers, H McEvers, R Melot, J Melot, V Mills, E Mirackis, J Moller, E Moore, R Mulligan, J Negahnquet, S Negahnquet, P Nicklass, A Niewenhuis, W Noel, H Ogee, C O'Keefe, W O'Marra, J Parnbogo, A Pambogo, G Pambogo, J Peeples, J Peltier, J Peltier, O Peltier, R Petterfier, L Petterfier, S Richstatter, A Richstatter, G Rodd, J Rodd, T Scottt W Seek, A Shaefer, F Shapawatuck, J Shives, C Shoemann, J Simpson, J Slattery, J Spencer, A Spencer, J Steinberger, T Stucki, J Tierney, P Turnbull, W View, N Wano, F Weld, O Whaley, R Wichulis, C Zoeller, A AWARDING OF REWARDS. Gold Medal for good conduct (gift of Rev. Fr. Raphael Derives, O. S. B., of New York, N. Y.), to J. Shoemann. Beautiful Topaz Rosary, for Christian Doctrine (gift of Very Rev. W. H. Ketcham, of Washington, D. C), to R. Peltier. PREMIUMS Christian Doctrine J. Mulligan, B. Hillerman, J. Goodin, J. Slattery. Penmanship S. B. Berry, A. Zoeller. Rea...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

224 The Indian Advocate. Negahnquet, who received 'a happy surprise, as no prize other than the one for good conduct had been offered. Following is the list of pupils in attendance during the terra: Total number of pupils enrolled "pupils'. . '. '.10 .... Boarders 49 Average attendance - ,, Acton, Madeline Acton, Zoa Belcher, Ommie Bruno, Ethel Bruno, Vina Brant, Naomi Bradley, Lucy Blair, Maggie Bourbonnais, Olive Cummings, Cora Curley, Tillie. Chilson, Margaret Chilson, Myrtle Chilson, Marie Davis, Maggie Davis, Laura Davis, Annie Delonais, Archangel DeGraff, Laura DeGraff, Helen Etienne, Elizabeth Greiffenstein, Osie X Hardin, Zoa Hardin, Rose Barthelme, Susie Barthelme, Annie Grove, Lucy Hillerman, Theresa ENROLLMENT BOARDERS. Hardin, Louise Hardin, Julia Haas, Mary Haas, Ethel Haas, Bernice Higbee, Ida May Higbee, Ina Higbee, Nina Haster, Annie Joyce, Josephine Kelsey, Nina Lane, Annie Lareau, Annie Lareau, Cordelia Lazelle, Adell Lazelle, Eva Lazelle, Osie Manture, Ruth Martel...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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