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Title: Recorder, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 116,947 items from Recorder, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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UNCLE SAM SAYS LOWLY ONION IS EDIBLE LILY [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

UNCLE SAM SAYS LOWLY ONION IS EDIBLE LILY Uncle Sam wants us all to eat more onions. He says the has been falsely painted—that in reality it is edible lily. Says we shouldn't pay any attention to etiquette m attempting to from the breath— but instead follow our appetites and eat the onion all like and is good for us. At least the U. S. Bureau of Markets says it contains more vitamines than any other vegetable, are essehtial. say food experts. Pictured here .are two tots of the southwestjad yust a part of the new 7»CQO car^cropjjvhic^ijs pouL,coming_on« _

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Long Life for a House Fern. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

Long Life for a House Fern. In the living room of an Oxfordshire (England) country house Is a maidenhair fern that has just celebrated its fifty-gixth birthday. It is now some two feet across and very fine, fresh and young in complexion. A year or two ago it seemed to be falling into the sere and yellow leaf and was threatened with its first illness. But after consulting with a local specialist the owner (who has tended her plant herself for 50 years) gave it a dose of cod liver oil. The hrownnes.s that threatened to invade the whole plant soon disappeared under the treatment, and it is now as vigorous and as green as ever. This maidenhair has, therefore, not only lived 56 years, hut is still In the stage of active growth and development.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Disconcerting, at Least [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

Disconcerting, at Least William Koch, an interior decorator, had an experience recently that might well be —well, it might at least be called disconcerting. He went to a North side church one morning to make some plans for decorating the edifice. The janitor had told him where to find the electric switches, but when Koch got there he found he had misunderstood the directions. He couldn’t find the lights, so he went groping through the dark interior in search of them. Carefully he followed the line of pews, then went forth in open territory. Then it happened. Koch, with arms outstretched stepped into space—and landed with a healthy ■splash in the baptismal pool. The janitor forgot to cover it. • He sat by the fire in the cfmrch basement a long time and regretfully mused on the fact that it wasn’t Sunday.—lndianapolis News,

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
To Prevent Suicide by Gas. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

To Prevent Suicide by Gas. Henceforward nobody but a hermit with a bad cold in the head will be able to commit suicide by the gas route, according to officials of the United States bureau -of mines. The bureau recently announced the pefection of a system of mixing chemicals with the illuminating gas in such a manner that leakage can be smelled “all over the house.” Experiments have been successfully carried out with several different kinds of odors, including banana, wintergreen and grain alcohol. Two other concoctions result in odors described as “sumptin’ terrible.” Ancient eggs are said to be mild in comparison. This odor, the experts believe, is sufficient to discourage any would-be suicide who is worth the saving. The discovery is expected to make accidental asphyxiation impossible and will also go a long way toward preventing destruction of property by gas explosions.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
ALL HAVE SOME PROTECTION Mother Nature Abandons None of Her Progeny, in a Helpless State, to Their Enemies. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

ALL HAVE SOME PROTECTION Mother Nature Abandons None of Her Progeny, in a Helpless State, to Their Enemies. Nature has provided for everything, down to frogs and little sticklebacks. All the little animals that seem so helpless have their own ways of protecting themselves, says London Answers. If he suspects that some larger and stronger animal Is out to eat him, the toad Is able to swell himself out until he looks very ferocious and Is far too large to be swallowed. The frog has longer legs than the toad and therefore can jump better. His eyes are at the top of his head, to enable him to see all round, for having no neck, he cannot turn his head. He can change the color of his coat If If should prove necessary. It takes him about a quarter of an hour to do this thoroughly and after it is accomplished It is extremely dillicult to distinguish him from his surroundings. People sometimes try to catch the lizard, but meet with no success, for the only part of its body one can get at Is ...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
SAW STEAMBOAT AS ENEMY Sailors and Fishermen Alike Dreaded Power of Which They Had No Comprehension. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

SAW STEAMBOAT AS ENEMY Sailors and Fishermen Alike Dreaded Power of Which They Had No Comprehension. When Fulton’s steamboat, the Clermont, made her maiden trip on the Hudson river in 1807, it frightened more persons than it interested. Fishermen and small boatmen to a man believed it to be some horrible monster, and headed for shore as fast as they could go, and once on land ran at top speed into woods and fields to hide. Crews of larger sailing ships were no better, and many a schooner was deserted and left to drift down stream as the snorting, clanking, <moke-tossing Clermont appeared. Later it w/ts made known along the river what the thing was, and there at once arose a great wave of hate instigated by boatmen who saw their business ruined, tmd by fishermen who were sure the noise of the steamboat would drive the fish to sea. Added to them were hundreds of religious fanatics who declared the boat was the work of the devil and a “flying in the face of God.” So acute di...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Decorative Church Windows. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

Decorative Church Windows. The art of glass decorating is not a "modern Bohemian accomplishment. The Roman Cathedral of Prague contained, In 1276, two. windows which were decorated with Old and New Testament scenes. Decorative win: dows soon became a faVuite form of church ornamentation. Asnaes Sylvius, who subsequently' became Pope Piiis the Second and incidentally was a very close student of contemporary affairs of Bohemia, records that the, churches of the Czechs possessed many “high and wide windows which were brightly and artistically decorated, and such style of decorating was not confined to the churches in the large cities and towns, but even the distant hamlets prided themselves on churchqs containing windows ornamented in a similar fashion.” The curriculum of the division of technical arts of the University of Prague included courses in painting, woodcarving, and glass ornamentation. No degree was ever conferred on a student unless he could exhibit sufficient aptitude as a...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
America's Meat-Eaters, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

America's Meat-Eaters, Take it the world over and the annual consumption of meat amounts to 39 pounds per capita. Here in these United States, however, the figure rises to 180 pounds a head, declares the Los Angeles Times. The American Is the world’s champion mieat eater. The average citizen of the United States will every year eat more than his weight fn red beef. The Englishman is supposed to be a terror in the meat line, but he omy takes on an average of 120 pounds a year. Of course, the vegetarian will insist that the Americans are the lowest type of civilization and are a feeble, pulseless people tottering to the grave. But if they can do what they have done under the incubus of 180 pounds of beef every year, what could they not accomplish If *hey would only leave meat alone? The people who have banished booze from the land should now arise Jn their might and absolve America from the curse of filet mignon.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Romance Language. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

Romance Language. “What are all these withered blossoms?” “Evidence in the case, Your Honor.” “Huh?" “He wrote no letters during the courtship. Merely said it with flowers.”

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
FEAR GHOST OF WOODS Reported Appearance of “Stick Siwash" Causes Indians to Abandon Hunting Grounds Precipitately. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

FEAR GHOST OF WOODS Reported Appearance of “Stick Siwash" Causes Indians to Abandon Hunting Grounds Precipitately. The “Stick Siwash” has relumed to haunt the trapping grounds north of Fort St. James. Terror stalks the wilderness trails and panic grips the Indians. If a brave hears the crackle of a twig in the woods he looks about him in *fear that this ghost of the big woods is dogging his steps. A number of Indians, it is said, have been frightened off their trap lir^s. Fort St. James is one of the 'oldest posts in British Columbia owned by the Hudson’s Bay company. It was founded in 180G by Simon Fraser, the pioneer explorer for whom the Fraser river was named. Several hundred Indians live about the fort and market 'their furs tljere. “Me ketchum fox in trap,” said Musk-a-no-wah, who has abandoned his trap line on Manson creek. “Me hear little nfblse. Look up. See Stick Siwash. He heap big Indian, Got war paint on. He look mean. He say nothing. Wave tomahawk like he say, ‘You get...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
MADE STUDY OF FISHES Eminent Naturalists Who Gave Qood Service to Humanity, and to the Finny Tribes. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

MADE STUDY OF FISHES Eminent Naturalists Who Gave Qood Service to Humanity, and to the Finny Tribes. It te reported that when Dr. Frank Buckland, the great naturalist, was In his last sickness, he* said to an anxious friend that he could not believe Almighty God would be very hard upon one who loved His fishes and other living things as much as h,e did. Another friend of the fishes, Sir Charles Edward Fryer, knight, died not long ago at Watford, near London, England. His whole life since he began active work was devoted to the promotion of knowledge of fish and fishes, in relation to the service of mankind. There was no higher authority. He was awarded endless medals and honors by expositions* and societies for his monographs-and annual and other reports. He was one of the first to define the international regulation of fisheries of the high seas, and was a leading member of many fish congresses and commissions. He was the final authority, with the last deciding word to say on all m...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Sea Appropriately Named. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

Sea Appropriately Named. The name by which the Hebrews knew tlie Red sea —the Yan Suph, or sea of weeds of sedge—would appear to give litttle indication of the reason for the title which has been applied to this body of water in later years. But, as a matter of fact, two terhis have a common origin. Unlike the “Beautiful Blue Danube,” which is really a dirty yellowish brown, the Red sea is really red —the color being due to the prevalence of a minute bright red plant, a kind of seaweed. This plant is said to be so small that 25,000,000 can live and thrive within a single cubic inch of water. Therefore, instead of being mottled with red, fhe sea appears in many cases to be of a scarlet shade. A red dye, which tradition says \vas used hundreds of years ago, is made from this weed, but, in the places where it is not foundr the waters of the Red sea are as bine or green as those of any other body of water. —Youth’s Companion. ,

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Taking Stock of Oneself. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

Taking Stock of Oneself. The head is the big factor in the measuring up of business. Many a fellow has learned a routine that puts him In a class by himself when it comes to doing things. But to measure up in the fullest sense one mu«t not only meet routine but forge ahead and do .that which is new. Here is where the head comes in. It helps a fellow manage himself and put his best Into the job. When he can do this he can manage others and get them doing better than they have ever done before. This self-mastery is the best asset in directing affairs that require several hands. Instinctively they learn to respect the leader who manages himself and .they find Ur y to their Interest to stand by him. The head Is the big thing in making team work effective.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Pursuit of Wisdom, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

Pursuit of Wisdom, “Did you follow my argument?” inquired the youthful debater. “Oh, yes,” replied Senator Sorghum. “I followed it a good deal the same as my dog out home follows a rabbit. He never catches up with it, but he enjoys the sport.”

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
A Prompt Denial. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

A Prompt Denial. Pop—l heard something about you today. Billie —It’s not true, pop. 1 neve* did such a thing in my life.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
CRIMINALS USE THEIR BRAINS “Profession" cf Roguery Today Has Risen to Dignity Almost Appreaching a Fine Art, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

CRIMINALS USE THEIR BRAINS “Profession" cf Roguery Today Has Risen to Dignity Almost Appreaching a Fine Art, The big robberies of jewelry in the south of France recently are a reminder of the übiquity of the modem criminal. The thieves may have been local men, hut the probability is that they were importations from England or Australia or the United States. Criminals engaged in the “big push” are much-traveled men. The whole world is their hunting ground. A few thousand miles are of little moment with thousands of dolllars as the ultimate goal. Expert jewel thieves, confidence tricksters, card sharpers, exponents of the “infallible”! betting system —all at one time or another make tfrurs of the world, if necessary, in order to pick up wealthy victims and by skillful nursing lull them into a belief that dishonesty is a silly rumor instead of an irrefragable fact. It docs seem strange to the millions of people who carefully guard their pennies that men are to he found who will over th...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
WEDNESDAY IN HOLY WEEK Solemn Ceremonies in Sistine Chapel Commemorating the Death and Resurrection of Christ. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

WEDNESDAY IN HOLY WEEK Solemn Ceremonies in Sistine Chapel Commemorating the Death and Resurrection of Christ. At the office of the Miserere, which is sung in (he Sistine chapel at Rome on Wednesday of Holy week, a ceremony takes place in which a triangular candlestick, upon which are 15 candies, corresponding to the number of psalms recited, is placed at the epistle side of the altar. After each psalm, one of the candles is extinguished by a master of ceremonies and after the benedictus the candle on the top is alone not extinguished, but is removed and concealed behind the altar and not brought out until the end of the service. While the canticle is sung the six candles on the altar are extinguished as well as those above the rails. The custom of concealing the last and most elevated candle and bringing it forward burning at the end of the service, is an allusion to the death and resurrection of Christ. In the same manner the other candles extinguished one after the other may repr...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Dreaming of Arms. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

Dreaming of Arms. To have one cut, announcement of the speedy death of a relative or dear friend; a male, if the right arm is •injured; female, if the left. The two arms cut, Imprisonment or sickness. The arm broken or emaciated, for a private person, sickness, family af.fliction; for -a man in office it denotes public distress, such as defeat of an army, famine, epidemical illness; for a married woman, separation, divorce, widownood. Arms dirty, distress. Anns inflated or swollen, riches for brothers or very affectionate relatives. Arms stout and robust, happiness, cute, deliverance. Unfettered and well developed, favors to be received. Larger and more robust than custom ary, joy, profit, unexpected wealth from a son or soldier. If the dreamer he a woman, increase in the fortune and influence of her husband. Arras covered with hair, acquisition of fresh wealth. Arms covered with sores or ulcers, sorrow, sadness, loss of time and of money.—Chicago American.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Companionable Moose. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

Companionable Moose. That a moose may be friendly on occasion has been indicated by a report from Topsfield, Me., of the adventures of the local game warden with one of these large animals. Early one morning the warden discovered a moose far out in the center of a frozen lake. Evidently the ice made poor going, in the opinion of the animal, for it was unable to keep its footing. The warden, aided by several residents of the vicinity, managed to get the animal upon its feet, and to shore, where a quantity of hay and other feed was heaped on the ground. The moose, after satisfying itself that only kindness was meant, ate heartily of the provender and thqj) made off at a leisurely gait in tlie direction of the deep woods.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Freak of Nature, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 13 May 1921

Freak of Nature, There ai’£ plenty of people who firmly believe that a man has one less rib than a woman, because of the sacrifice required of Adam when Eve was created. Observation of human skeletons fails to confirm this idea. ' But how about the Arab horse? Why does it lack a A’ertebra. All other horses have 24 vertebrae in their backbone; the Arab has only 23. This shortness of the Arab horse’s back may have something to do with the animal’s superior endurance, as often proved by long-distance tests. — Philadelphia Ledger.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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