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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Is it Air, or Something Else. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Is it Air, or Something Else. The entrance of air into a wound is the dread of the surgeon. When an abscess is opened he must prevent the air from mingling with the blood-clots if he would avoid putrefaction and its teaming accompaniment of animalcule life. Some eminent London surgeons inform me that they never squeeze an abscess, lest when the pressure is relaxed the air should be sucked in. Now, whence this dreaded power? Is it tbe air itself that causes putrefaction, or is it something carried mechanically by the air ? A follower of GuyLussac would affirm the former; a heterogenist would refer the animalcules to "spontaneous generation ;" a holder of the germ theory would ascribe the putrefaction to seeds or eggs floating in the atmosphere, and which, when sown upon the wound, sprout into this crop of minute organisms. Do any data exist which will enable us to say, with certainty, which party is right? I think so. — T. H. Huxley. Professor Huxley takes the latter view of the subj...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Our Weekly Crop. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Our Weekly Crop. Our stock ranch is in fine condition, and we have some fino specimens of Ayrshire Cows for the inspection of our friends, which we present with remarks on Stock liaising. We look through the library of Mechanical and Scientific Progress, preparatory to investigating the matter of Irrigation, where we learn a number of interesting facts and receive several valuable suggestions. We then examine the Tea and the Coffee Plant of California and look at Summer llanges for Stock. We next visit the Vineyard, get directions for cultivating the vine in addition to those previously given, and see what the Vintage Prospect is. We go to the Orchard, and receive hints for its management. Wo then read over the Agricultural Notes of the Coast, uud say a few words to the Unfortunate Unemployed, pointing out a way in which they may get work. Should any one bo unfortunate enough to lose a baud or leg, he can see how Artificial Limbs can be supplied. The Professor will lighten hij conva...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

A Slight Showeb visited most sections of the State on Monday last; but not sufficiently copious to be of much benefit anywhere. It seems more than probable that the severity of the drouth is to be continued through this month also. In 1865 it rained six days, giving 1.46 inches in May; in 1864, .63"; in 1860, 1 inch; in 1859, 2.86 inches; in 1858, 1.55 inches; in 1854, 1.58 inches. Any repetition of those quantities would be of service now. The California Wool Crop, for this season, will bring a large amount of wealth into the State. If the crop reaches 25,---000,000 pounds, as some estimate, it will aggregate a value of $7,000,000, and the extra surplus will go far to meet the deficiency in our foreign exchange caused by the decrease in our flour exports. The Strawberry. Market is now in its prime. The choicest berries are jobbing here at five and six cents per box. The aggregate yield this year will be unprecedently large.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Cotton Growing and Manufacturing in California. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Cotton Growing and Manufacturing in California. The oxporionoe of the present season is. operating to impress still deeper than ever on the minds of the agriculturists of this State the importance of introducing a greater diversity in the products of our soil. Of all the uses to which land can be put, the lesat profitable to the grower and, with perhaps the exception of tobacco, the most exhaustive to the soil is the cultivation of wheat for export; hence we hail with pleasuro any efforts that promised to turn the attention of our farmers from that leading specialty.; In the light of the experience which wo already have of the advantages which California presents to cotton culturo, we have strong hopes that the growth of this staple will ere loug occupy an important position among our domestic products. The interest in this product is not confined altogether to the agriculture of the State; but dwells largely upon the prospect which it promises in forming a most important addition t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Eastern Visitors to Our State Fair. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Eastern Visitors to Our State Fair. The number of visitors from the Eastern States to our State Fair this fall is likely to bo very largo. Numerous inquirios aro l>eing made of tho Secretary of the Board of Agriculturo in rogard to a reduction of fare on the railroads for such visitors. Upcn application to the officers of the Central Pacific road they have authorized the publication of the following liberal terms or rates of fare from Omaha to Sacramento and return. In companies of twenty-five tho round trij> will be $170 each. In companies of fifty tho round trip'will be $130 each. In companies of any larger number the prices will be reduced in the same ratio. Applications for tickets for such excursions upon the abovo named terms to be made at tho office of the railroad at Omahn. Tho abovo rates will bo payable in currency. All articles or animals to be exhibited at the State Fair the Central Pacific Road will transport to and from the Fair free of charge. Th...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Importations of Full Blooded Sheep. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Importations of Full Blooded Sheep. It will lie soen by tho advertisement of Robert Beck, Recording Secretary of the Stato Board of Agriculture that we aro this year going to receive largo and important additions to our stocks of full blooded sheep in this State. The importations are coming from tho best flocks in tho Eastern States and Europe, and comprise selected samples of the best breeds known in the world. The Silosian sheep are from tho flock of William Chamberlain of Red Hook, Dutchoss county, New York. This flock is descended from the full blooded Merino sheep of Ferdinand Fisher of Wirchorbatt in Hilesia, Prussia who imported them in 1811 from Spain, having carefully selected them from the best flocks there. They havo boon bred from that time to the present, in tho most scientific manner until thoy havo gained tho reputation of being the "Electoral" flock. In 1851-3-4-6-7 & 8, one hundred and sixty sheep woro carofully selected from tho Fisher flock, and one hu...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Col. Strong's Cotton Enterprise. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Col. Strong's Cotton Enterprise. Col. J. M. Strong commenced planting his cotton, on the ranch of the Buckley Bros., at Hopcton, Merced county, on the 2d inst. He will put in 200 acres, which will be an experiment sulliciently large to test the business beyond any possibility of question. Wo lcaru by convolution with Mr. Buckley that tho land is well selected, with natural moisturo near enough to the surfaco to maturo the crop with littlo or no rain. The soil is chiofly a black, sandy loam, although tho tract varies sufficiently to embrace several varieties. Tho ground was plowed five inches deep some three or four months ago, and plowed a second time as the seed was planted. About eight and a half tons of Dixon cotton seed has been used as preforablo to that of any other variety. The mode of planting is described by the Stockton Independent, as follows: Two onehorse plows are kept going to mark the ground, and two others to cover the seed. One man follows each plow and deposits the...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
PATENTS & INVENTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

PATENTS & INVENTIONS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Full List of U. S. Patents Issued to Pacific Coast Inventors. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Full List of U. S. Patents Issued to Pacific Coast Inventors. (Fhom Officiat. Reports xh DEWEY & 00., U. 8. and J'OItBIUN I'ATKNT AOENTB, AND PUBLISIIKRB OF run Boixntifio Piikhb.j Foe the Week Ending April 25th. Grain Separator.—Daniel Best, Yuba, Cal. Washino Machine. —Henry A. Gaston, San Francisco. Earth-Aookh. —Thomas Orchard, Sacramento, Cal. KEi"iNiN«i Suoak. —August F. W. Partz, Oakland, Cat Antedated April 22, 1871. Li uiticAToß. — William Eaton Phillips, (Silver City, Idaho Tit. Kaimvay-Swit<;h Chair, —Geo. H. Scougule, Carson City, Nov. Store-Truck. — Andrew V. Smith, San Francisco. Fiue-Kindlino. — John W. Still, Sun Francisco. BiiASTiNG-FusE.-lliehard Uren, Santa Cruz, Cul. For tee Wees Ending May 2d. Carbureter for Air and Gas.- Louis Marks, San Francisco, Cal. Sand-Cap for Huns of Vehicles.— George H. Novens, Livorniore, Cal., assignor to himself and It. N. Ciiughell, same ]>lace. Hydraulic Apparatus. - Phineas Franklin Powers, Qonoa,...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Notices of Recent Patents. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Notices of Recent Patents. Among the patonts recently obtained through Dewoy & Co.'a Scientific Press Amorican and Foreign Patent Agency, the following are worthy of mention: Grain-Separator. --D. Best, Yuba, Cal. This in volition consists in a series of peculiarly shaped screens, to soparate and cloan the various qualities of grain, and in the use of feeding and returning elevators, by which the grain can be fed to the hopper with very little labor, and by which it can be return ed to the hopper for a second cleaning, if required. The discharge spout for the second quality of grain is so arranged that it will either discharge the material immediately or return it to tho returning elevators. The first quality is allowed to fall upon a screen which has a peculiar tossing motion and throws the gram into tho dis charge spout, or (by reversing tho driving pulley) retains it as long as desired. A sot of angular plates is introduced between the screens, and by their action and...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Editorial Notes Eastward.—2. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Editorial Notes Eastward.—2. Sacramento io Dutch Flat. Leaving spunky little Sacramento, we are fairly started on our trans-continental journey. We pass the workshops of the Central Pacific Railroad, /here busy industry holds sway, the hospital of the company, founded on a wise benevolence worthy of wide emulation, and cross the long bridge over the American River whose waters we shall again see under the most varying conditions of natural wonder and beauty. It is not long before we get in among the mountains and ravines and around sharp curves and up steep grades. 187 miles from San Francisco- Altitude 3,600 feet. Ninety-fo,ur miles from Sacramento, we are passing through a deep cut, the so-called Bloomer Cut, at an elevation of over twelve hundred feet. Up we go, past villages and towns, and over bridges, with doubled engines, until we suddenly meet an appar ently impassible barrier, a deep, wide abyss in which rushes the American Biver. Yet we must somehow or other reach that opp...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE HOME CIRCLE [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

THE HOME CIRCLE BY OUR LADY EDITORS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Bunch of Lilacs; or How Thorvald Found a Father. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

The Bunch of Lilacs; or How Thorvald Found a Father. NELL VAN [Written for the Tbess.] "Mister will you give me a flower?" said the timid voice of a child at my gate, one afternoon, when I was at "work in the garden. Looking up I beheld the diminutive figure of a boy, barefooted and ragged, who looked wistfully at a large lilac bush in full bloom at my side. Gathering a handful of the fragrant blossoms, I called the child in and asked him if he was sure he needed a flower more than food or clothes. He looked up with a tearful eye and said, "I want the flowers for my mother, who is sick, I heard her say when the fever was on, that she was going to pick a handful of fresh sweet lilacs down in her mother's garden, and when she woke up sho asked -what I had done with her beautiful flowers. Oh, sir, she is very sick, and I havn't any father. If she should die what would become of me!" And the little fellow burst into tears. There is to me no more pitiful sight than the despairing grief o...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Old Footpaths. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Old Footpaths. Nature abhors straight lines, it is said, and she has certainly managed her land scenery so that we have to make a good many curves to get through. There is a great deal of poetry in a footpath, and Mr. T. W. Higginson is not the only one that thinks so. He asks: Who cares whither a footpath leads? The charm is in the path itself, its promise of something that tho high-road cannot yield. Away from habitations, you know that the fisherman, the geologist, tho botanist have been driving homo, and that somewhere there are bars and a milk-pail. Even in the midst of houses, the path suggests school children with their luncheon-baskets, or workmen seeking eagerly tho noonday interval or tho twilight rest. A footpath cannot be quite spoiled, so long as it remains such. You can make a road a mere avenue for fast horses or showy women, but this humbler track keeps its simplicity and if a queen comes walking through it, she comes but a vilage maid. Roads become picturesque only ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
"My Little Ones Pray." [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

"My Little Ones Pray." Three littlo heads each night bow down, One black, one goldan, and oue browu; Six little bauds, so soft and fair, Are clasp'd each night in evening prayer, \nd the swotest hour of all the day Is tho hour I hoar my littlo ones pray. Throe pairs of eyes, so wondrous bright, Like brown birds, fold their wings each night; Tho day is flown when tho light is gone, And I wait in darkness till tho morn Has called them back to this world of care, To bleu mo again with an evening prayer. Three tiny mouths, so soft and rod, Arekisse'd, as oe'r the little bed [ gather up their lust " Good night, " To cherish till tho morning light Has broken their dreams into smiles most rare, And promised another evening prayer. A golden step in each little prayer, Forming a bright and radiant stair, And often at night when the lights burn low I watch the angels come and go, And the Bweetest hour of all the day Is the hour I hear my little ones pray.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Female Delicacy. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Female Delicacy. The following is going the rounds for woman, but we can see no reason why it is not equally applicable for man: Above all other features Which adorn the female character, delicacy stands foremost within the province of good taste. Not the delicacy which is perpetually in quest of something to be ashamed of; which makes merit a blush, and simpers at tho false construction her own ingenuity has put upon an innocent remark; this spurious kind of delicacy is far removed from good 80nse , _ but the high-minded delicacy which mantains its pure, undeviatod walk alike among women and tho society of men; which shrinks from no neocessary duty, and can speak, when required, with a seriousness of things on which it would bo ashamed to smile or blush; that delicacy which knows how to confer a bonetit without wounding tho feelings of another—which can give alms without assumption, and pains not the most susceptible in creation.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mothers, Speak Kindly. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Mothers, Speak Kindly. Children catch cross words quicker than parrots, and it is a much more misehievOIM habit. When mothers sot the example, you will scarcely hear a pleasant word among the children in their plays with each other. Yet the discipline of such a family is always weak and irregular. The children expect just so much scolding before they do anything they are told, while in many a home, where tho low, firm tone of the mother, or tho decided look of her steady eye is law, they never think of disobedience, either in or out of light. O, mothers, it is worth a great deal to cultivate that "excellent thing in woman," alow, sweet voice. If you are ever so much tired by the mischievous or wilful prank of the little ones, speak low. It will be a great help to you to even try to be patient and cheerful, if it cannot succeed. Anger makes you wretched and your children also. A Smile. —A beautiful smile is to the femalo countenance what the sunbeam is to the landscape. It embellishe...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
YOUNG FOLKS' COLUMN. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

YOUNG FOLKS' COLUMN.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Talk with the Boys.—No. 4. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Talk with the Boys.—No. 4. In our last talk, I made a suggestion that you should study, not # only the habits of those insects which injure plants, but also thoso which may please and instruct. Those of you who have read tho Rubal Pkess, especially tho issue two weeks ago, will be ready to class tho silkworm among tho insects which afford instruction and pleasure, and may be, also, profit. Some of you may havo an opportunity of studying tho nature and habits of the silkworm this month. Hundreds of others would like to havo the ohance, but it is too lato for thorn to make if this tear, unless they can visit the eoooonory of some neighbor during the feeding season. But by next year, you may each havo the pleasure, if you aro really in earnest about it. You can contrive some plan by which yon can have a dozen or moro mulberry trees, and a few silkworm eggs. The KußAii Pkkss gives you, this year, very full instructions. You can save tho papers and study them. Have your own little cocoon...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Counting Baby's Toes. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Counting Baby's Toes. Dear little bare feet, dimpled and white, In your long white uight-Kowu wrapped for the uiglit, Coui* let in« count all your queer little tm t», ■•, I'iiik iiß the heart of a shell or a roHC. One is a lady that Kits in tho'iuin: Two in a baby, and throe ih a nun:, \ !■ • Four is a lily, with innocent brca«t; , . ■ Fivo it* a birdie a»lu p in it* nukt. An Item for the Boys.—A little boy twelvo years old once stopped at a country tavern and paid for his lodging and breakfaßt by sawing wood, instead of asking it as a gift. Fifty years later, the same boy passed tho same little tavern as Goorgo Peabody, the banker. Said our little tlirooyear old, "Mamma, won't you give mo some ruoro cake Upon reeeivinga reply, sho looked very sorroVful and , said slowly, " When I'm a big lady, and you are my little baby girl, I'll givo you lots and lots of cake." ;, The beauty of youth is its willingness to learn of ago. Let all our young friends remember this, whenever thoir elder...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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