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Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,897 items from Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Commemorating Fallen Soldirers. TREE PLANTING AT BRIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

trRE PLANTING AT BRIGHT. f idea of commemoration the "WITH district lads wl1" h,,v'* lemo'V °[° \AA of bM.K the local fcllen 00 " nee with the co-opera sf> ^tr»»® council and other bodies # So"nf ,1"' t.nt thre* trees in the fevjecidei 10 1 Frid:>v last was the N<'U&a*t,t. and although .asr-1- °Ttt8 very eld and wet l-ibe wW.th,J"e ff i» m-vurtheleea a large ? 0ndfrfo,0'' reeidents at the square to $ ",,emt>lai?<> ot" v At 3 o'clock the *a<cl| chiw"" werB mft"h.aUedf m/p;8 ;. formed ,. detachment of Genu r : V*J. W'X'^tenant It. Manning. f ,cade« «nJer L opie. The pr» ^»DUTb°'Jd down Ireland street, 8,,d leulUr" y "L 8nd back to the square fijarnard-etre . drawn up. and %«* tto ,cl»'drrenG R Abraham (presi *Hcomt JrJ shire), who expressed hie f'r'lt at seeing so many present. Con a^btat eeei K m wid tbey were a!| SUmnng. W f"r" ke part in a solemn isEtiaW^ t0 commemorate the lemony. * dj5,riot heroes in some nemory o hp trusted th...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Enchanted Olen. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

The Enchanted Olen. THE stage at Victoria Hall will bo transformed into an "Enchanted Glen" on Wednesday evening next, when the Girls of the Bright Advance Guard will stage eheir entertainment on behalf of the local public library. During the past few days excellent progress boo been made with rehearsals, under the direction of Mr E. i. Delany, and patrons can therefore look forward to a pleasurnble night's entertainment on the 6th. Tho "Enchanted Glen" is a musical comedy of exceptional merit, the principal charac ters in which will be sustained by Miss Belle Fulton, as Dame Grumnus; Miss Monica Hinge, ae Nora, an orphan ; Miss Babe Hastings, as Queen Mab, queen of fairies; MisB Lila Butler, fairy of the glen ; Miss Nita Banks, as Vigilsnta, the fairy recorder; and Master Charles Butler, as Ariel, the Queen's messenger. The minor parts will be filled by Misses Galloghly, Trnoy (2), M'Donald, Stewart, and Biddle (2) as village girls; Misses Sudekum, Truulsen, Dewar and Ahern as milk...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Wandiligong Band Visits Harrietviile. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

Wandiligong Band Visits Harrietviile. [FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.] A VISIT from the YVaudiligong Brass Band to Harrietville on Saturday after noon caused quite an unusual stir in tbis place. The object ut the visit was to assist tlie Ked Cross, but it was not tbis alone tbat created such a deep interest in the occurrence. It was mainly owing to the strong feeling of friendship that has always existed between the residents of thr two places, and wben sucb a strong body aa this band numbers braved the weather, on their own volition, to assist their neighboring Red Cross Society, the townspeople took the opportunity of showing their appreciation nud extending to them their friendliest greeting. By arrangement of the Red Cross ladies, the band hud supper at the Star Hotel. For tunately the eveuing proved fine, with a bright moonlight, and the recent falls of snow had taken a lot of the cold out of the weather. The result was that a large attendance gathered in front of the I'ublic Hall, wh...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Memorial Service diligong. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

Memorial Service diligong. L'-ST Sunday afternoon the RPt ,i BrammaU conducted a memori,i, H-?' at Holy Trinity Church, Wandiij;':,Ir4 - a mark of respect for the late u?'1'! Keith luce, whose death on lh field in France had been amiouncd n : in the week. Owing to there, 3? man's other appointments in Vo;t ' the hour fixed for the service 5?]. Chis, however did nut affect the 8l?:i' mice, for the cburcb was crowded v'-'S congregation representini; all deno^M tons. Prior to the service, tt'e : brass band, under Bandmaster T ~jj' iiarns, played the following . tious Stand up, stand un far 1.,"^ "All Hail the Power," '. AWdt iV Ms," and " Sandon." The serviT'/ the burial ol the dead formed lt»''V?" portion of the service, and this cited by the preacher in a most in-*!'? sive manner. The hvmu " Neaitr--'" God to Thee " was next sung, and j§," the rev. gentleman proceeded discourse. He took for his tei!, Samuel, 1 : 25-"How are the m:'sV fallen in the midst of battle," preacher said tbey...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Died For His Country. PRIVATE ALBERT BETH [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

Died For His Country. PRIVATE ALBERT BETH YESTERDAY (Thursday) morning Mrs J. T. Bottles, of Bright, <? formod, through tho Rev. G. B:: that their eldest son. Pris^'3 Bottles, had been killed in actio^ ^ha?e ia France.1' Frirate he known ti mw oH amongat hi« comrade on tit j-'. I field aonia 25 years asro %th3 the sobriquet ot "'LefsaW/ gained that title through methods of plavine After district, Private Bettles joined 'r.V poiitan fire brigad?, and veara engaged in that occuP^1'*., was a /ioo manly youn£ nun as^. farorite owing to his pleasmt^ ways. Private Bettlcs, 40 years of age, leave? a sister to Mrs '.V. J. Ho^!!..c; and a family of four boy. Much sympathy iiasb^s*-^ for the deceased bero's PirySv' snd family. At the Shirs the afternoon the fUg * tnaat as a tribute of respect. For Chronic Chest Compfo^' ( =' Woods' Great Peppermint It is well to remember to the expense of cleario? flD ' tho ground, it is fitee treoa simply because they or 2/ per dozen may besaV? bu...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Mining Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

Mining Notes. Following dredging returns harej reported for the iraek ealed r: lust Junction ... Maori Queen Porepunkah Ovens Valley Last week Mr James Hayes, oiH bourne, one of the pioneers of th? dr?in industry, marked out (throuzh his ir Mr John Shelley, of Porepun'sa':1 Ovens River from Wobongs Myrtleford, as a dredgin? te ? idea is, apparently, to dredge o:!j; .itreaoi. and in view of iha ca^:X' nade by landholders lo.ver dm*, 'alley, of the possibility of their fc:. Jeing swept away by the river fa;?:*' tng on their properties, there niay fcc virtue in the projsct. It wiii i-i* nemDered that a few months srj: State Rivers and Water S«ipp!yk mission sent an engineer to insz&f report on the trouble nientiunri - gentleman considered ;«>me pro5&' .vas necessary, and concluded iiijfv by stating that the Cjrnmissiofl 7-: aave no objection to the laidh:^ carrying out the work. As thii *. mean an outlay of about ^"600, hw once seen that the difficulty waste' those c...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FLYING GOOD FOR THE COMPLEXION. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

'""I ? ? LI "rj-r. -'USVUV FLYING GOOD FOR THE COMPLEXION. A slip of a Eirl, Miss Ruth Law, who is at present visiting England with the object of buying one of the last English aeroplanes, which,.she says, have a great reputation in Amer-j ica, looks quite unlike the strenuous! type of sportswoman. And yet it was she who set America talking about her prowess as a flying woman last No vember when she made a record for crosscountry flying. Her longest flight on that occasion, i when she was attempting to make" for New York from Chicago without a descent was 590 miles, the previous record held by an American flyer be ing 452 miles. I Miss Law set out on her quest for! the swiftest aeroplane, built for cross country flying, which money can buy, with her eye on the great Ameri can Air Derby, which la to be flown j tills year. The course is from San| Francisco to New York, a distance of 3,000 miles, and Miss Law hopes to fly 1,000 miles ."at a jump," as she picturesquely says. While watch...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Only One Life. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

. Only One Life. Bach of us has hut one life to lire and, in a great degree, must live that i life alone. We all have thoughts, ( feelings and desires buried deeply In | our inmost solves which it Is impos j sible for us to communicate perfect | ly to others if we would. Even when I we suffer physical pain no one can know completely what our feelings are, however freely sympathy may be extended to us. We really always have to bear our own agony-if pos I sible, with a smile. Nevertheless, | there is no reason why we should suf : fer pain which is avoidable. There , are many people who endure common I ailments-such ns rheumatism, gout, I neuralgia, lumbago, backache, sciati j ca, anaemia, blood disorders, indiges tion, biliousnesB, jaundice, siclc-head ache, general debility, gravel, stone and bladder troubles-who do not re alise that their suffering probably is due to the retention in the system of uric and biliary poisons, which would be expelled naturally if the kid neys and liver ...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CLEANING THE KAISER'S FACE. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

CLEANING THE KAISER'S FACE. Few people can say that thev have helped to wash the face of the Kaiser, and, when it comes to the use of tur pentine in the process, probably the only Englishman who has enjoyed the privilege is the late Mr. W. P. Frith, R.A. "I wa:s painting a picture of the mar riage of the then Prince- of Wales," said Mr. Frith, in describing the inci dent "and among my sitters was little Prince William, now Emperor of Ger many. " "He " gave me great trouble by his restlessness, and, to keep him quiet, I gave-him some paints and a brush, and allowed him to amuse himself by painting on the bottom of the canvas I was working on. But he decided to paint himself instead. "On looking around, I found that he had so daubed his face with blue paint that he looked more like an ancient Briton than a modern Ger man prince. His lady nurse-in-walt ing was horrified, and tried in vain to remove the mess. Finally, she ap pealed to me, and with turpentine we proceeded to cleanse the ...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

"vr--^ with Monkey Urand Monkey Brand cleans as well as Polishes-so the Shine, corning on a clean surface, is more telling. Moreover, there being nothing of a greasy nature in the composition of Monkey Brand, there is nothing to spoil the garment on which the Badge is worn. That is one reason why Monkey Brand is so welcome in the Home, and so univer sally used. Makes Copper like Gold-Tin like Silver-Paint like new-but IT WON'T WASH CLOTHES. LEVER BROWIKrti LIMITED. "Wolfe's. . V. A RELIAwua STIMULANT ' °sid ^ THE SA^K»T OP DRINKS. ' Hollow Hopes. "Never despair. Somewhere be yond the clouds the sun is shining." "Yes, and sorfiewliere below the sea there's solid bottom. But that r docsn't help a man when he falls overboard." fjuxtajyte^A X/uat Fiobur Customary. "In what .direction does the village tie, my friend?" "Well, sir, it's liable to lie in any old direction "that comes handy, but at this time of the year it's mostly about fish." WATCHMAKERS . JEWELLERS - OPTICIANS 337-9 BOURK...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DAIRYING. THE BUTTER MANUFACTURER. The Cow as a Machine. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

DAIRYING. THE BUTTER MANUFACTURER. The Cow as a Machine. Her material- is grain, grass, hay,. straw, wjater, and other foods, from which slie. returns us milk. This is a, finished product as milk, but raw material for butter or cheese. The foods that make the best milk make the best growth in young animals. The young animal takes the raw ma terial, milk and other foods and con verts it into blood, bone, muscle, hoof and hair, to produce the finished pro duct-the cow. The cow is' hot only one of the most wonderfully construct ed animals, and a delicate and intri cate machine, but she cannot always be kept running without stopping for repairs. While she is being run, run her at full speed, and be sure she is a good- machine-as "good as you can make her-because it costs just as much for motive power and repairs to run the poor as the good cow ma chine. To find out which is the best cow machine iif your herd use the scale and Babcock tester, then weed out all the poor, machines you have...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LINSEED CROPS. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

LINSEED CROPS. So far linseed has not been grown in this State on an extensive scale, and that grown has been for purpose of experiment only (says the April is sue of the N.S.W. "Agricultural; Ga zette"). Last season a crop was sown on the Yanco. Experiment Farm and yielded only about 14 bushels of seed per acre. This does not pay in com parison with other crops which can be grown on this area. If, however, the straw could be utilised as well as the seed, there would be more inducement! to plant this crop. The irrigation area is certainly the most promising district in the State for linseed culti vation, on account of u regular sup ply of water being assured. The most suitable soil for growing: lin seed is that of a rather loamy de scription. The seed should be sown in the autumn, say, any time during April or early part of May. The amount of seed to be sown is from 301b. to 401b. per acre, and to this area should be applied with the seed about 601b. of superphosphate. The seed can ...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Australians Well Cared For. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

Australians Well Cared For. - Mr. H. M. Smeaton, one of the''wax work commissioners' of the Austraia-! sian Y.M.C.A., recently visited Fland-1 ers in the interests of our troops and! went through the town of Ypres. Ini an interesting account of the now fam ous town lie says it was a most extra ordinary sight. If we. conceived a town of 30,000 inhabitants, quite de-» sorted, every building unroofed, and . the greater portion of the buildings! absolutely smashed to pieces, we j could form some idea of the picture | of desolation tlie city presented. The Y.M.C.A. had four or five cellars there occupied as reading rooms and game rooms, and one or two gramophones. Those places were constantly in use. He met in France several Australian ? doctors whom ho know. It was splen-! did to see the great care that was taken of our men. Everything pos-'; sible was done for their comfort and : convenience. Tired Tim: I remember coin' in dat house over dere onct. S Plodding Pete: Did you strike any i...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FACTS ABOUT AMERICA. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

FACTS ABOUT AMERICA. The United States is a Federal Ro public consisting of forty-nine self governed States, with a central ad ministration at Washington. New York, the capital, with over 5,000,000 Inhabitants, is the second largest city in the world. The population of America is esti mated at 100,000,000, and 1G,000,000 of these are of Teutonic origin. The United States is the third larg est naval Power in the world. Her principal warships. * are:-1st class battleships, four; armoured cruisers, ten; 1st, 2nd and 3rd class cruisers, twenty-five. Although ' the standing American army does not exceed a quarter of a million men, the country lias an enor mous reserve to draw on. At the outbreak of the Spanish American War President McKinley appealed for 300,000 volunteers. In less than twenty-four hours more than 1,000,000 answered the oall. President Wilson is Commander-in Chief of the national forces, and he commissions all officers therein. Under the President the control-. ling body...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

"the Phoenix insures . CROPS and STACKS against damage by FIRE and Crops against damage by HAIL STONES. A telegram despatched from London oh January 22, 1900, in which a poll ing-; result In the general election of that year was announced, has Just been delivered to Mr. B. C. Afford of Wit bam, Essex. The telegram stuck in a crevice In' tlis tube between the telegraph room, and was not discov ered until repair work was begun. The Union Trustee Co. of Australia Limited HEAD OFFICE: SSS COLLINS ST., MELBOURNE. Also in Sydney and Brisbane. Far terms or- tin? other Information concerning the company, please call or write. 3AML. COOKE, Manager. POULTRY WAHTEB-HYLANDS .Hyl&nd'a buy DucKinffs, Chickens, Turkeys at i>er lb. li\e Wf.ight. Hyland'a pay Top Prices tor Old Hens, any breed. Hyland's save you commission und cartage, orate sunt free. Hylana's will post you a monthly price list; obtain . one before eelling «laewhere. DAVID HYLAND & SONS PTY. LTD. Exportr*, 8ennit...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DO TREES THINK? [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

DO TREES THINK? . Thousands- of years back all the trees, and plants were hugs and coarse of fibre. They have gradually became refined and more beautiful, just as the animals and fish of to-day are less ugly than the monsters of prehistoric times. The trees have "bettered themselves" just as the animals have. The old trees have the power of re animating new ones, and they like companionship, for they grow in communities. All these facts go to prove that trees have intelligence. They are extraordinarily long-lived, their span' of life lasting from 3000 to 4000 years. The forest kings which grow in Sierra Nevada, California, 5000 feet above sea-level, have seen the rise and fall of empire after em pire, and they are still growing as they have continued to grow for the last 3000 years.

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AUSTRALIA PLAYS THE GAME No. XXI. The German Danger In the Pacific. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

- AUSTRALIA PLAYS THE GAME No. XXI. The German Danger In the Pacific. It continues to bo remarked that Australia does not know slio is at war. Wherever wc look no signs of war are apparent. The training camps are shut up or nearly empty, arid th2 pursuits and pleasures of the nation remain unaffected. We eat well, we sleep well. This, too, at a time when Great Britain is nearly on a half ration of bread, and sugar is almost unobtainable. Besides being short of essential foods, the people of Great Britain have, from day to day, to deal with the most stupendous diffi culties. and to face new dangers even h(?foro old ones have been surmount ed. Great Britain seemed as if she were winning the war when ruthless submarining began. She has just be gan to cope with this grave danger when suddenly Russia becomes a source of weakness. The effects of this now danger have already been tremendous. The French and British offensives on the West wero so mighty that they were rapidly over powering t...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
He Learned. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

He Learned. "So you were invited to participate iu a profit-sharing scheme?" "Yes." "How cUd you come out?" "I discovered that the purpose of the scheme was not sharins> but shearing." I detest Brussels now; it will be necessary to have it disinfected be fore I return to it.-Princess Maris Jo*8 of Belgium.

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW TO BECOME A RUNNER. [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

HOW TO BECOME A RUNNER. Running is one of the best of exer cises lor the whole body. It rounds out a hollow chest, drives the oxygen Into the farthest air-cells of the lungs, wonderfully increases their capacity, I and develops the leg, thigh, stomach, ? and waist muscles. But it must be learned just as skating, swimming and 1 bicycling have to be learned, and I there are two things that must be [ kept in mind by the learner. The first is-whether in sprinting, dis tance, or "cross-.country running-to run entirely on the ball of the"foot, or, as they say on the track, "Get up on your toes!" By striking.on the'ball of the foot, Tvhich is a sort of natural spring-board, the- runner, .takes -a longer stride, and the spring that he gets enables him to lift his foot more rapidly and repeat the stride more quickly than the runner who goes flat-footed. As length and rapidity, of stride are what give speed in'running, it follows that a flat-footed runner ci.il never be a fast one. Anothel re...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FROM "THE BOOK OF ARTEMAS." [Newspaper Article] — Alpine Observer and North-Eastern Herald — 1 June 1917

FROM "THE BOOK OF ARTEMAS." "Now it came to pass that all the young men went forth for to fight, and there ? remained only those that were old or inform and. somei that had sneaked them through. "And because there was much.work to be done, therefore did the rulers of the land send word unto the wo men, saying, Come ye unto the work shops of the cities and there do all those things that the young men were wont to do. And they came as with one accord. "And they did sell merchandise in the bazaars. And so it fell out that when a man went forth for to buy his undervestments, the damsel that was in the bazaar would say unto him, What is. thy need, 0 son of man? . "And he was ashamed to tell her all that which was in his heart, and he knew not what to say; wherefore was he halting'in his speech, and his countenance did take on the color of blood. - "But the "maiden that did tend" unto his wants, she was in no wise disquiet ed, Und she did beseech him to im part unto her the name of the th...

Publication Title: Alpine Observer And North-Eastern Herald
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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