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Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirr... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,106 items from Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Do Men Exhaust their Originality at Sixty. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

Do Men Exhaust their Originality at Sixty. Ehrlich' and von Behring ' have reached that age, and' from all over the world congratulations have poured in upon them. The great demonstration seems tinged with & sad note as though these men had reached the end of their productive life. They will work on the old lines until they die, and we hope the final end will be many, many years off, but will the product be worth while ? We hope it will be great, but can a brain or body of sixty, cut... out new trails in the wilderness . . of ignorance ? Osier showed how rarely it is done, and many thought that he said that men over sixty could not do anything at all. A great work may not be culminated until long after that age, but great discoveries arc made by,| boys. A few . even believed that he ; said that men over sixty ought to j be chloroformed, though he himself | was nearly sixty at the time. Some' of his critics were top old to J understand what he said. The French have recently d...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Woman who Served as a Soldier. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

Woman who Served as a. Soldier. 4--; "Albert" Cashier, an inmate of the Soldiers' Home at , Quincy, Illinois, who had been masquerading as * man for sixty years, and served as a soldier in General Grant's army dur ing the Civil War, has just be«n found to be a woman. Her .sex was .discovered only while she was under the care of the surgeon. The woman was born in Ireland seventy-two years ago, and went to America as a stowaway'.clad in boy's clothes. When the Civil War broke out she enlisted in the 95th Illinois Infantry, and participated in some of the bloodiest battles, at ways behaving with great gallantry. When the war closed she resumed civil Ufa as a workman until age ,nnd results of exposure during the war made her helpless to support herself. She' then entered the Sol diers' Home. She has refused to disclose her name or to tell her family-history. There is still living in New York a lawyer named Conklin whom no ! thing short of a seeming miracle ' saved from a terrible death....

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Dynamite's Queer Freak. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

Dynamite's Queer Freak. » Fortunate WAS a man who ' was looking on some years a^o at the unpacking of & ease of dynamite in n shod at La Bathie, when, for Borne unknown reason, the dyna mito exploded with terrible conse quences. The shed was blown to matchwood, nn:i every man in it was literally blown to atoms, with tho exception of this sole survivor who, although the bench on which he was sitting at a distance of only a few feet from the explosion was completely shattered, had not a bruise to show.

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TO TRANSMIT VISION. SIGHT BY WIRELESS CAUSE OF UNREST. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

TO TRANSMIT VISION. SIGHT BY WIRELESS CAUSE OF UNREST ? Bow far tho ecasolesa advance ot' "science ' contributes to cause. unrest in tho social sphere we cannot Bay. But the disappearance of old land marks; tho intermingling oi the world oi' "reality"- and tho world of mlraclo cannot -l>e without its influence. Wo hare to look a very long way ahead to get beyond the : state of universal flux. But we are. entitled to boliove that every step taken is a step townrds the Eter nal vTruth. . Civilisation, which created privacy, is devouring its child (says " Tho^ Times"). The telegraph, quick tru/-; flc, the telephone, hnvo made their breaches of 'the castle wall; and now j comes. Dr. Low with the most , dead ly siege-piece over dreamed of. It is useleSss to argue that no ono is compelled to nourish in his boBom the telephone or its more venomous offspring. Ono cannot live the modern life without, the contrivances 'of modern life; and they are few ' who hove the strength of mind and ne...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

for Indigestion, Biliousness and Acidity. Invaluable forTefS ^cdn^

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Tortoise's Long Life. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

A Tortoise's Long Life. Proverbially stow in every way, the tortoise is perhaps the slowest of all animals to die. Stories about toads found living in closcd pockets of the solid rock may bo j discounted; but that tortoises live i to be 200 or .300 years old is be lieved. In the hall of the Episco pal Palace of Peterborough thcro is preserved under glass the shell of aj large tortoise. Records prove that! it sojourned at Peterborough in the time of seven bishops: John Tho mas, 1747-57 ; Richard Terrick, 1757 ; Robert I-amb, 176d ; John Hinchcliffe, 1769; Spencer Madan, 1794; John Parsons, 1813; Herbert Marsh, 1819-39. Beside the shell lies the descrip tion, which says : "It is well as certained that this tortoise must have lived 220 years. Bishop Par sons had rernmibered it for more, than sixty years, and had not re-| cognised in it any visible change. j It ate all kinds of fruit, and often! a pint of gooseberries at & time; but it made the greatest havoc among strawberries....

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Wild Cattle of Chartlet. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

Wild Cattle of Chartlet. The herd of wild cattle which be longs to the Earl of Ferrers is said to he of on even purer breed than that of Chillinghain. Tho theory that the brood is indigenous appears to ho supported by their habits at the present day. When alarmed, they start off at full gal lop for a short distm^e, then turn and face their foe in a senii-circle, with the bulls in front, the rows be hind, and tho younger nnimnlB and calves still further in the roar. If further approached, these tactics, .which are clearly those of wild animals, are repeated, or the ad versary is charged. and attacked. The food of the Churtley herd con sists of the very conrscst grasses, and in winter . of tho coarsest hay, riiwhes, and1 dried brnckcn, provided for them in open sheds, which af ford a slight shelter from the cold winds which blow across the open park. The home of these cattle is situa ted on high ground which was en closed about the year 1200, and forms a portion of Chartle.v Park, som...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE ORCHARD. PEAR MITE (PHYTOPTUS PYRI). [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

THE ORCHARD. PEAR MITE (PHYTOPTUS PYRI). ? This tiny mite which is impercep tible to the naked eye, is a source of unlimited annoyance to the poor grower. An examination ol trees at tacked by the pest will disclose the fact that many of the young loaves are damaged by small brownish blis ters. These are produced by tho la sect, which gnaws Its way between the two outer- skins of the leaf, and immediately commences to feed and multiply therein. The spots, 'though small at first, gradually extend, un til finally, owing to several blisters becoming confluent, the whole of tho leaf may appear as a blackened blis tery mass. This is brought about by the rapid multiplication of tho Insects within, which burrow through the tissues, sucking up the juices. A bad infestation is usually followed by premature shedding. of the foliage, to the, ultimate detriment of both the tree and Its fruit. Regarding the life history of thin pest tho late Mr. Crawford rays "There are two ways in which the mite...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XXX. CONCLUSION. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

CHAPTER XXX. C0N0LU8I0N. The operation was over - a most successful one-but tb8 doctors found it impossible to brine their patient out of the chloroform. Thoy wor'ied hard _and did their utmost-perhaps a little more than they would have done for any but a millionaire, for, after all, doctors are human, and the almighty dollar is not without its attraction for them ; but they failed to bring even a flicker to the eyelids of the rich man, who, Uke Dives had enjoyed his good things in this life, but like him, be had to leave for others to enjoy. Dead !" and the doctors went downstairs to tell Jack the sad news. Heart disease ; they hadn't detected it. There were some kinds that it was impossible to detect. Then they left the Hall, and Jack went to tell Pat and Mrs. Hetherington, A little while later the blinds were drawn over the windows, the flag was hoisted at half-mast, then the church bells rang a dirge, and all Wyoth shay knew that Joshua Hethering ton' was dead. A few days later ...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Sleeping-bag. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

A Sleeping-bag. I The announcement that Sir Er nest Shackloton-.is to have a sleep ing-bag which will be the lightest in existence- for his next expedition calls attention, to the wonderful qualities of Kapok, the material with which it is to be made. Kapok is a fibrous, silk material, obtained from tho seed pods of a tree grown largely in Java. It is six times as light as cotton, and is so oily that it is quite waterproof. The reason why Kapok is not more generally known is because hitherto the attempts which havo been made to invent machinery for the purpose of making Kapok of real commercial value havo met with indifferent success. A ma chine has now been invented, with the assistance of which it will be possible ' to "card" Kapok fibre, "so that it can be used ior coat linings, bed quilts, nnd bo on. A mattress stuffed with Kapok was recently tested in tho water, and though only weighing 3.0lb., it supported a man . weighing 2001b. lying on it. In this regard tho United States N...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WRONG CARD. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

WRONG CARD. It was a small railway station. The village was about a mile away. "May I leave thiB box here (or an hour ?" asked the traveller of a por ter. "I want to make a call in the village." "Certainly, sir," replied the por ter ; "but could you give me a card to put on it ?" . "I'm afraid I have not got one," replied the traveller. Pulling an old card from his poc ket, the king of hearts, he continued : "ThiB will be a meanB of identifi cation." "Very good, sir," said the porter. Ill due time the traveller returned, and wag looking about for his box, when he observed the porter comin? towards him, grinning. "My word,'sir, that was a gooil trick." "What was a good trick ?" asked the traveller. "Why, sir, a gentleman came alon~ just after you had gone, took an ace ol hearts out o! his pocket, and put it on top of your king, and he went oB with your box, sir." Candles will last double the usual time if treated in the following way,: Take each candle by the wink and give It a good ...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Staples as Gate Hinges. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

Staples as Gate Hinges. Two of my ranch buildings wore built- with a small space between i them, and this space I had occa sion to close up with a Rate. I had . no hinges nt hand and know ing that those made of leather al ways sag, I sot about to make up something that would answer the purpose. I secured four large st&p lea and droVe two of them into one of the buildings so the points of each staple were in & horizontal position, allowing d small portion i of each to project. Into these I placed the other staples aiul drove; ? them into the gate with their points i | in a vertical position. The illus .tration' shows the position of the I staples. This made & good hinge for the light gate T used.

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"THE SWEET TOOTH. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

"THE SWEET TOOTH. Very msiiy adults, and children with 110 exception have a pronounced liking for sweets, metaphorically de scribed as having a "sweet tooth." Wo have our, respective preferences, some of us like the' flavour of pep permint, and others do not. Choco late is almost universally relisbel, but to a minority it is as "caviare to the general." Americans ..haye the sweet tooth in excess of ourselves. They include all varieties of sweets in the generic word "candy." Here is a recipe for making a cor tain candy capable of many varia tions to suit individual taste. In gredients required are : One pound of loaf sugar, one ounce of butter, hall a pint of water, flavouring ns 7.011 please. Doll sugar and water for two or three minutes till a soft ball is formed when rolled between the fin ger and thumb ; add the butter, and stir until it is dissolved ; put in the flavouring, remove the stewpan from the fire, and add the sugar by de grees until the mixture becomes thick and white ...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Patti's Phenomenal Fees. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

I Patti's Phenomenal Fees. ? Prom time to timo we hear o( fancy fees being paid to famous singers; but no singer has earned, the money that was paid to yatti when in her prime; During one'year nlone she made the huge sum of £70,000. At one time it was a common experience for her to make a thousand pounds insido two or threo hours. :In, 1870 she was paid £.9,600 for 'sixteen appearances at Covent Gar den, and when she went, on her Amorican tour she received as much as £1,200 a night at New Orleans. Curiously enough, no opera star has been paid such a big feo AS Patti not to sing. During one sea son at Covent Garden, in addition to the £800 she received at each performance, she was paid a retainer of £12,000 not to sing elsewhere during the particular period. Ma dame Patti originated the practice of insuring the voice, and she, in sure^ hears for £8,000 against total loss of voice, or £1,000 a perform-, ancc. On only two occasions did < she draft* the latter sum owing to he...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
War Mems about Mexico. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

War Mems about Mexicj), The land - forces under General Wood were backed up by 17,960 sallore, 8,070 mArinos, and 855 offi cers. Tho total area of Moxico is 767,005 square miles-ovor six times the size of the. United Kingdom. The popu lation, however, is only Just over 15,000,000 (Britain's population . i* 4B,869,090), of "whom only 19 per cent, aro of puro or nearly pure white blood. Moxico's navy is really of no ac count. It only consists of seven small vessels, including two gun boats. Against theso the United States can place thirty-three battle^ ships, fourteen armed cruisers, and 156 other cruft, including forty-seven submarines. America can place 100,000 well armed, trained, and partially-trained mon in tho flold. If necossary, these could be supplemented with 120,000 well*organisod militia, which, by an Act of 1908, the President is able to call out for service whether with in or without the borders of tho United States. " Tho last serious conflict ' between the United State...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
EXPLAINED. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

EXPLAINED, . Owner-"How did you ' come .. to puncture, tho tyro ?" , Chauffeur-"Rail over a bottle.": , Owner-" Didn't you see it -in time ?'.' . , Chauffeur-No I the kid hod It un- * dor his coat."

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Clever Rifle Bird. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 2 October 1914

The Clever Rifle Bird. . 4 ' Of all the quaint, cunning and self-, protective devices employed by wild creatures rfor tho purpose of keeping oft enemies, perhaps there is nono that equals the efTorts of the rifle bir£. There are several, species of. rifle-bird in Australia, but for. the most part they aro confined to Queensland, although at least some members of the family . may be seen in the north-east of New South Wales, and ono community has been noticed as far south as the Upper Murray. As becomes a branch: of the family of birds of paradise, the . rije-birds are very handsome. . The dominant colours in tho male are metallic and olive, green ; but there is a good deal of variation in the different species. As a rule the birds are found high among tall trees, ..and they make a peculiar crackling noise when disturbed. Tho birds collect sloughed snake-skins for use in connection with their nests. . When/ the construction of tho nest is finished they placo theso skins around tho ou...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Cloth and Nettles. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 9 October 1914

Cloth and Nettles. An English syndicate has recent ly . paid over £15,000 for the right to make yarn and cloth out of neltlc fibre, a German company owning the patent.' It expects to build up a big business from the use of what for generations has been regarded as a useless, annoy ing weod. But to-day the lowly nettle is put to a score of uses abroad. It ts high in value as food for swine and poultry ; in Sweden nettles are cultivated for cattle fodder., Poultry eat the seeds with avidity, and so do horses. . In England nettle beer, made from the stnlks and .leaves, is in great demand in some localities. Yarn and cloth, both fine and coarse, are made of the fibre; and even carpets. Doth fine lace and strong ropes are made from the Siberian nettle. One species of nettle produces nu tritious tubers, which 'are eaten boiled or raw in India. Another specics supplies chirm cloth, or ra mie. The roots of nettles, boiled in alum, yield a fino yellow dye. \ The juice of the stalk and leaves...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Women in Turkey. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 9 October 1914

Women in Turkey. . -tr. ! Turkish girls of. the better class in the cities, alter they are too old to attend the primary schools, are largely' educated at home by gover nesses, many of whom come from England and France, but, unfortu nately, do not always represent the highest culture of these na tions, so that the real lov« of stidy is not, as a rule, developed under their influence. Turkish women have a great ap titude for foreign languages, and those met on the steamers of the Bosphorus often speak French, and it is not unusual for them to speak German and English also. It is a well-known fact that many (Turkish women are engaged in trade, some even carrying on on extensive business, involving fre quent journeys to Egypt aJid other places, which pre-supposes the abil ity to read and write, as well as some knowledge of arithmetic. Moreover, conversation with the Mussulman women in the capital reveals some progress at the pre sent time in independence of thought; and, while social c...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Novels of the Road. [Newspaper Article] — Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror — 9 October 1914

Novels of. the Road. It was Fielding' and Smollett who began the jolly tradition in English fiction ' of sotting thoir heroes out on the road to pick up such curious adventures and com panions at they could fnd there; and it is at Ieait a curious coin cidence that they both wrote on Don Quixote, the. greatest of all travellers, after Odysseus. Smollett wrote & translation of "D->n Quir ote," and one of Fielding's earliest works was a ; play called " Don Quixote in England." So that it is not hard to gue*s whore that tradition started. . Dickons follow ed them in their tradition. He is the greatest novelist of tho English road. Thero aro more fine things of the road in him than in all of the rest put together. Thackeray . did not follow the tradition. He used the road very littlo, and Mias Austen used it not at all. But in spite of theso ex ceptions, that tradition of tho value of tho road in fiction was well established. Meredith nnd Mr. Hardy havo both used tlie road. Ev...

Publication Title: Malvern Courier And Caulfield Mirror
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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