ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Direct Action Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,114 items from Direct Action, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
4,114 results
BROKEN HILL STRIKE. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 12 February 1916

BROKEN HILL STRIKE. ?w At time of writing the Barrier min ers are still on strike for the 44-hour week. Their determination to win is illustrated by their refusal to accept the proposal of Senator Pearce to re turn to work for four days a week pending the hearing of their claims before the Arbitration Court. The miners evidently have little faith in the Arbitration Court unless there is a little economic pressure through loss of profits to the masters first brought to bear on it. The capitalist press with its accus tomed virulence is still heaping its abuse on the heads of the strikers, a sure sign that their action 'is en tirely justifiable from the working class standpoint. With the price of spelter 200 per cent, higher than at the outbreak of the war, and lead quoted at over £30 per ton, no wonder the masters are squealing at the workers' 'unpatrio- tic' attitude. Despite the power of the press and the scabby position taken up by many Craft Union leaders, the rank and file of the...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Mildura, Victoria. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 12 February 1916

Mildura, Victoria. The I.W.W. camp at Pinkey Bend was deserted on the 1st of February owing to the grape-snatchers mak ing a start. 'Old Sol,' after sending down his fierce rays at a rate of 116 degrees in the ice-box, at last brought the fruit to maturity, and the 'cockies' began to yell for 'hands.' After three weeks' rest the vobblies picked up their homes and took up their position on the job. Although they have scattered in dif ferent directions throughout the set tlement, they have made arrange ments to meet at different periods through the week to discuss the pro mess of the class-war and continue their campaign against capitalist so ciety. During the three weeks we were camped waiting for the boss to call, the I.W.W. camp became the centre of attraction. At all times, through ihe day and night, when not engaged in fervent debate, the songs of the wage-slave,, used to rent the air and struggle with the elements for sup remacy. More than one . hobo used to sit around the I.W.W...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"Direct Action." [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 12 February 1916

'Direct Action.' Despite the fact that 'Direct Ac tion' is entering upon its third year of existence under conditions any thing but favorable for revolutionary propaganda, there is no reason to be pessimistic with regard to the part which the paper will play iu the fut ure education of the worker along Industrialist lines. Two years ago, when the paper was started, beyond a few active members iu the various cities who steadfastly adhered to the propa ganda of Industrial Unionism in spite of sneers, abuse and peisecutlon, very little was known of the I.W.W. in Australia. To-day its members are to be found spreading the revolu tionary message in every part of the Commonwealth, and this is attribut able in no small degree to the in fluence which the paper has exer cised. The aims and objects of the I.W.W. are now too widely circulated in Australia for any set-back devised by our enemies to be anything more than temporary in preventing the publica tion and circulation of the paper. The ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"Spirits of Darkness." [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 12 February 1916

'Spirits of Darkness.' Sydney 'Herald' waxes wrath over the action of the Brqken Hill miners in requesting the editor of the 'Bar- rier Miner' not to publish anonymous attacks upon them in his paper. This action by 'he miners was perfectly legitimate. The individual who takes advantage of the secrecy which the press affords to pour forth his venomous slime against a body of men who are subjecting them selves and their dependents to star vation and suffering in a fight which they conceive to be right and just, and who has not the courage to re veal his identity, in lower than the lowest prostitute that ever adorned or disgraced a slum. Experience proves that such at tacks are in the majority of cases manufactured in the editorial office by the mental perverts who sell their brains for the boss's gold; so had the miners taken more drastic steps than they did, and rammed the lying state ments down the editor's throat, few of their class would blame them. It is amusing, however, to noti...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BROKEN HILL ACTIVITIES. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 12 February 1916

BROKEN HILL ACTIVITIES. ..Rooms, Palace Buildings, Sulphide-.. f - street. i t i i Wednesday Evening, at 7.30 p.m.— Edu- cational Class. t Alternate Sundays, at 3 p.m. — Business t Meeting. ? j Alternate Sundays, at 3 p.m. — Econo- uomic Class. ; Sunday, at 7.30 p.m. — Outdoor Propa- J * j ganda Meeting, near Post Office, in . ' Argent-street. Good Library. Also good collection . of Literature for sale. All live rebels welcome. J I E. J. KIELY, Secretary, J Local No. 3, I.W.W. J | ? . * £«

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MELBOURNE ACTIVITIES. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 12 February 1916

MELBOURNE ACTIVITIES. : Local No. S, 243 William gtreet. Monday, 8 p.m.: Business Meeting. Thursday, 8 p.m.: Educational Class * ' Working Class Economies. — T. Turn ; erj Instructor. Friday, 'S.30 p.m.: Propaganda Meet ing, Brunswick, corner Sydney Road and Victoria Street. ' Sunday: Propaganda Meeting, Yarra Bank. The rooms are open to all workers every night. All working class papers on file. Good Library. A welcome to till the 'disobedient ODes.' ;

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Revolutionary Thinking. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 12 February 1916

^Revolutionaiy Thinking/ The Capitalist Class, and their hirelings of the press, platform, and pulpit, are always telling us that one result of this terrible war will be that it will cause a revolution in the minds of all thinking persons, which said revolution will toe the cause of many jold superstitions , traditions, and institutions being cast into the melt ing-pot, and out of the ashes of which say they, something newer, brighter, and better shall arise which will make lor the common good of all. This 'revolution of thought,' which the master class and the^r prostitute de fenders are so anxious, apparently, to welcome, is already beginning to make its presence grimly manifest to 'all thinking persons'; yes, and un thinking ones as well, especially that section who have been content in the past to depend on the 'good' quali ties ol! the capitalist class for their precarious existence. The working class of this contin ent of Australia, if they only allow their eyes and ears to pe...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Our Third Year. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 12 February 1916

Our Third Year. ?? ? »_ — - — (By C. H. ANLEZARK). To-day we enter upon the third year of our existence. 'DIRECT ACTION' is an established fact. On its own merits it started; on its own merits it has won its place as the most un compromising, straight-out working class paper in Australia. And it has done this in spite of the most bitter opposition. In the eyes of our ene mies, we have, no doubt, all the faults possible for a paper to have. We have endured slander, persecu tion, and the thunders of the press. We have been written against, spoken against, sworn against;- we- have been sent to the devil, sent to jail, seat to Christ. We have been 'warn- ed' most solemnly, cautioned mysteri ously, frowned at, sworn at, laughed at, sneered at. pointed at — and yet we live and move, and we are grow ing bigger and more vigorous than ever. We have to thank ail those good friends and fellow-workers who in any way have helped to make 'Direct Action' a success, and those friends have been many...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 12 February 1916

SPEAKERS' CLASS. The Speakers' Class has been re started at the Sydney Local. There is a pressing need for an everin creasing supply of able propagandists —fellows who can expound and ex plain the philosophy and methods of the I.W.W. and make more converts, especially on the job. There are plenty who have a fail1 understand ing of Industrial Unionism, but fail to make its principles clear to their , ; mates owing to lack of practice in ? speaking and putting their case lo gically and concisely. The speakers' : j class aims at starting fresh ones on ; the road to effective speaking. It is held every Saturday at 7.15 p.m., at . .: 330 Castlereagh St. . _ ?? ? i

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
INDUSTRIAL WORKERS OF THE WORLD. (GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD.) BROKEN HILL STRIKE. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 12 February 1916

INDUSTRIAL WORKERS OF THE . :\ WORLD. \ 1 (GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD.) 1 : ___^._v. ????? ; I BROKEN HILL STRIKE. - J The Broken Hill workers (with the exception of a few small unions who attempt to cover their scabbery with the cloak of the Arbitration Court) are out on strike to the extent of b,QOQ for the purpose of enforcing the i4 -hour week. The Industrial Workers of the World endorse every struggle of the working class for shorter hours. Therefore, we issue an appeal to all locals of the Industrial Workers of the World, all members-at-large, and the working class generally for funds to carry on the strike. All monies should be sent through the General Secretary-Treasurer, Box 98, Haymarket, Sydney, who will for ward the cash on to the Secretary of the Strike Committee at Broken Hill. All monies enclosed will be ack nowledged through the pages of 'Direct Action.' Remember that Bympathy is of no use unless it is of a practical nature, 'He who gives quickly, gives twice.' Yours fo...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 12 February 1916

SYDNEY LOCAL. MEETINGS, &c. j Street Propoganda at Bathurst aud j Liverpool Streets Every Friday and j Saturday Evenings, at 8 p.m.; also Sun day Evening, at 7. '? Meetings in Hall: Sunday, 8 p.m., Propoganda. Wednesday, 8 p.m., Economic Class. Thursday, 8 p.m., Business Meeting. Also, Public Meeting Every Sunday Afternoon in the Domain. . / I i

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
I. W. W. Preamble. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 12 February 1916

I. W. W. Preamble. ? .^te- ? __ The working class and the employing class have nothing in common. There can be no peace so long as hunger and want are found among millions of working people, and the few who make up the employing class have all the good things of life. Between these two classes a struggle must go on until the workers of the world organise as a class, take possession of the earth and the machinery of production, and abolish the wage system. We find that the centreing of the management of industries into fewer and fewer hands makes the trade unions unable to cope with the ever-growing power of the employing class. The trade unions foster a state of affairs which- allows one set of workers to be pitted against another set of workers in the same industry, thereby helping to defeat one another in wage wars. Moreover,' the trade unions aid the employing class to mislead the workers into the belief that the working-class have interests in common with their em ployers. These...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Co-operation Versus Competition. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 12 February 1916

Co-operation Vers us Competition. Just when the idea of competition of man against his fellow man first started, it is hard to tell. It is known that, in America, Indian tribes competed or fought against other tribes, but that within these tribes ihey shared the necessities of life with one another. That no member of an Indian tribe ever went hungry when there was food to be had. There was competition of tribe against tribe for the necessities of life, but little competition of man against man. For years the idea of individual competition has been taught and preached. The people have been taught that they must compete against their fellow men to live. In the workshop or factory they must do more wGrk or better work than the other fellow, and that they must gain the favor of the boss. So that if the bess should decide to cut down his force, the worker who has beaten his fellow man at work is the one the br-s.s will continue to employ. This idea of individual competii tion has been pr...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Organised Scabery On the W.A. GoldFields. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 12 February 1916

Organised Scabery On the W.A.Gold-^ I Fields. H i am writing from Corinthian, a H o:...'-liorse place in the wilds of the I VY;-.t, where the dally routine of the H ^;,ve is work, work, work, Sundays H jv!i c-xeepted, amusement being coh B ft.ii nous by its absence, and where I tl'.f boss's cow is a goat. H A dozen or so rebels remain here B to f?3l the news of the One Big H t i ioi5 to the newly-arriving blanket ? fiin- B 'ihe only attraction, or will I say, B nnuuxment that we have had for the* B la*1 ' w0 or tnree weeks, has been to B v;ach through our O.B.U. field B oia.-f.es, the industrial war in and B arj.md Kalgoorlie and Boulder. B The capitalist class formed into a B sniiare. using only the weapon of so B liflsi-Hy against the noisy but feeble H ti!a:ii of a divided rank and file H ami iheir yawping, gawping, brain - ^B ]i.t-;T misleaders. ^m Some few hundred wood-choppers H ci ! cut with empty pockets and sto H iv.ai-lis to fight, the wood companies ^m [,,r a rise of a wh...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 19 February 1916

FREMANTLE ACTIVITIES. Hall, 35 Phillamore Street. Wednesday, 8 p.m., at Hall: Lecture night. Friday, 3 p.m., at Hall : Economic Class. Saturday, 8 p.m., at Hall: Business Meet ing. Sunday Afternoon, 3 p.m., Esplanade, Perth : Propaganda. Local 5 has now a library of up-to-date revolutionary economic working class literature at the Hall, and all rebels after some mental dynamite are invited to blow in and help swell the ranks of the rebel army. The Big- N.Z. Strike and Some of it* Lessons, was the subject of fellow-worker , Reeves that drew the attention of a big ? crowd at Perth Esplanade on Sunday af ternoon, 30th ult. The subject was mas- ; terly handled by F.W. Reeves, who took j an active part in the strike and 'tfas there- ! fore able to speak from actual experience j in outlining the cause, tactics, and ulti mate defeat of the craft unions with their obsolete methods of carrying on the Class I struggles against the perfect scientific j organisation of the master class. j After...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Joe Hill AN APPRECIATION. Blackwood, South Australia, Feb. 8, 1916. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 19 February 1916

Joe Hill ? » ? ~ AN APPRECIATION. Blackwood, South Australia Feb. 8, 1916. The Editor, 'Direct Action'— While staying in. the home of Luke XorLh (Editor of 'Everyman,' Los An geles, California) in July of 1914, 1 had the privilege of reading a letter received, by Luke North from Joe Hill in acknow ledgement of some copies of 'Every, man,' which had been forwarded to the I.W.W. songwriter at the State Prison Utah. ^ ' ' A copy ot this letter was in my posses sion when 1 left America, but it has since j by mischance, been destroyed, 1 regret to say. Hill's letter was fine, simple, direct— j the personal note entirely subdued— and j without the bitterness or melancholy 1 which, with a lesser nature, might well 1 have tinged the words of one who must I have realised, even at that early date., 1 that his body would never be delivered j back alive to his comrades from the I clutches of the enemy. j Hill expressed interest in Luke North's I work there in Los Angeles, where 'the I enemy is ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Man With The Axe. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 19 February 1916

The Man With The Axe. ? » ? By 'Old Eureka.' Again the man with the axe has been *\ayiiig the class war in the endeavour to obtain belter pay and working conditions 1i;;;t (he wretched dole he lias received during all the years since the monopoly by ihe. Kurrawjujg Co. of the timber bell containing the important essential firewood — a primary necessity for the mining industry and the whole of the goldh'olds population'. As soon as it became assured that the deeper lodes of the Golden Mile were a permanent and payable concern, the lioodle sharks saw the value ol' the fire wood supplies in a. country not too heav ijy limbered, and intrigued successfully withi the thci) existing government of this W. A. State. They obtained a conces sion of the forest belt parallel to, and out some distance from the auriferous line of country, and thus the criminal act of government robbed the goldfields' popu lation of the free, use --of a prime neces sary of life. The method of this gang; of;. Govern...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Queer 'Goings On' At Broken Hill. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 19 February 1916

Queer ^Goings 0n? At Broken Hill 1-1: J. Xiih v,: rites from. Broken Hill undo i' dale iVrruury 9: — iiiu strike ior 44 hours was settled yes terday uy a iiiLuncLui staieineni and the i.&tiisiaiice oi Cohen and Bennett; oi iiei ijounio. Trades \Jouneii. The wire from ieaixe asking- tiie siuve-s .to resume work uij. a iour days per wedc basis, pending « .settlement uy Armtrauozi, was carried i»y aooui a 5 to I vole. Jos. Thomas, the JU'inber i'or ill is Burgh, fellow-parasite of i.:al. We uij, saviour oi IST.Z. working class and receiver oi oasy meal tickets,- and L'oJieu and Beniiets took great pleasure in slinging bouquets at tlieniselyes ior having through that aggregation known as the Industrial Disputes Committee oi Trades Hall, Melbourne, kept the working class from the throats oi the Master Class sixty-three out oi seventy times, a re cord that Hughes or Uontpers would envy. Any questions on the financial state ment were not allowed by the section in the mecijnjj; repr...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"SENTENCED TO DESTITUTION." [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 19 February 1916

'SENTENCED TO DESTITUTION.' The Victorian State Government in pursuance of its desire, apparently, to give the 'voluntary' system of enlist ment 'a chance,' has retrenched 1500 railway employees. The following reso lution was passed at. a meeting of the railway men held in Melbourne last Sun day : — 'That this mass meeting, representa tive of 25,000 railway employees, enters an emphatic protest against the wholesale dismissal of supernumeraries Avljen neces sary and reproductive works require to be carried -3ut, and is of opinion that the State Government, with the assistance of the Federal Government if required, should raise sufficient moneys to carry on such works and maintain in employment the 1500 men sentenced to destitution.' Much lip service is being given by many unions in Australia to the antiCon scription agitation, yet here, is as vile a form of conscription as could possibly be imagined, and unionism is taking it lying down like the tamed cat it really is. The plutes, t...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
An Open Reply To Lord Derby's Letter. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 19 February 1916

An Open Reply To Lord Derby's Letter. By 'CA.SKY.' Tlie following loiter appeared iu the 'Labor Leader' (England) on November 4tii: — TO LOUD DEJLIUY — My Lord, — At lii«j ifcyiH'ji oi juany Ihhik ing people, con:-i-tmg oi i.L.i'.-t-rs, JLi.ti.J'.-f.-r -., Brotherhood members, co-up«rutws, Fiilii;m*, Quakers, Conservatives, Libwai.s, ajiii jjnujy 'Have Naughts' a\ ll-j wu:-k jolly hard ior a lin ing, 1 take ttiib omsoi uuin - ol' y lowering Uie letter which you lecvjuij audiunhfu to JUJ sun. Had we not lir.st of ail received your request from the War Oiiice, we should jiot nave had the presumption to write to a person iu your exalted position. Allow me, as parent, 10 thank you i'or the kind interest you are displaying iu one oi1 my children, i appreciate it all the more when I consider the terrible .struayies his mother and I have faced during the iast thirty yoarw. 1 cannot expect your lonisiiip to luulersUuHl the diUiculty of tearing niuo children on a miserable wage. Your lordshi...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x