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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

The Indian Advocate. i85 r " The Hero of the Yukon. - - j T HE devotion and ardent desire to teach the sav ages to be Christians have urged many mission aries beyond the Rocky Mountains, and even further to the frigid banks of the Yukon river, in Alaska. Prominent among these brave sol diers of the Church was Charles I. Seghers, born at Ghent, St. Stephen the Deacon Martyr's day, 1839. His early and only ambition was to aid in spreading the word of God among the poor In dians of the wild West. After finishing his class ics he pursued and completed his studies for the ministry at the American College. As a priest, the favored objects of his solicitude were the savages of the various tribes, whose dia lects he learned familiarly by intimate intercourse with them. After ten years of successful missionary work on the conti nent and on Vancouver's Island as a simple priest, and from 1873 as Bishop of the latter, Mgr. Seghers was promoted by the Holy Father to the new Archbishopric of Ore...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

T 1 i mi 186 The Indian Advocate. rivers. But persevering against all difficulties, Bishop Seg hers succeeded in opening many eyes to the light of the faith; and where they had found only the red man in all his igno rance of his Creator, he left, after the lapse of a season, Christians who praised God in the simple, sincere manner so pleasing to Him. "Well, Bishop," said some one to the wearied Apostle after his promotion to Oregon City, "1 congratulate you on having escaped " "What?" interrupted the ardent lover of the Cross. "Rather condole with me that I have lost charge of the most consoling and loved of labors. Believe me, I grieve sincerely that I am not left with my Indians, abandoned by all, and needing the very service I love to give." Four years were spent in organizing the province of Ore gon, when the Archbishop made preparations for a visit to Rome to present his report to the Holy Father, and with the secret purpose in his mind of obtaining from the Sovereign Pontiff a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

The Indian Advocate. 187 Prelate, "if that be all, I shall have to supply your place with a priest, and then we shall sail with good consciences, if not full purses, early in the spring." The voyage was a well-earned rest for both, and they ar rived in the Holy City wearied but joyful, and full of antici pation of the pleasures of soul to be tasted in the Home of the Popes. Fr. Pierre thought it not a little singular that the Archbishop, in his visits to the many holy spots in Rome, should choose the tombs of the martyrs as though he felt a secret kinship with the inmates. On coming out of the Cata CTmbs, Segher's first exclamation was: "Oh! how glorious to give one's life for the faith of Jesus Christ! I have always had a special devotion to the preaching martyrs. I hope they, with Sts. Peter and Paul, will gain us the grace and glory of imitating their life and death." At the Tre Fontane, where the Apostle of the Gentiles bowed his glorious head to the sword, his eye lit with heav...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

i88 The Indian Advocate. with a special affection. The Holy Father expressed himself as well pleased with the flourishing condition of the new province in Oregon, as made known to him from the diocesan report, and was speaking words of encouragement and wishes for future success, when the Archbishop surprised him with his two extraordinary requests. "Holy Father," he said, and his voice trembled as he spoke, "now that the archdiocese in Oregon is established and, with the help of God's grace, will continue to prosper, will it not please you to appoint in my place another Arch bishop and allow me to return to my poor Indians in Van couver's and Alaska? They are in sad need of my help, and, Holy Father, I feel that I know better than many another how to deal with their uncouth nature and prepare their hearts for the reception of the holy gift of faith. I know their dif ferent languages, and they have already learned to love a little the poor Bishop who preached to them four years ago....

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

The Indian Advocate. 189 your work, and you will not regret when, in future years, you witness the triumph of the Church in the Northwest, that you rank among her defenders and promoters there. Would you sacrifice -this glorious prospect for the sake of the hard, un promising missions of Alaska and Vancouver's Island?" These predictions of future glory, even of so holy a nature and from the lips of the Pope, did not have the intended effect on the imagination of Archbishop Seghers, and still firm in his noble purpose, he replied: "Yes, Holy Father, most will ingly would I leave all these bright rewards to some one more deserving than I, and most joyfully would I go back to my old post; it is not hard, and I do not fear danger, as long as I know 1 am doing God's holy will. Ah! how glorious it is to suffer even unto death for that holy will of Hisl" Then again bowing his head, as if secretly asking mercy at a still higher tribunal, the fervent prelate remained silent. The Holy Father,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

I! T- T t igo The Indian Advocate. the daily dangers we run, and I beseech you grant me and my companion the Plenary Indulgence at the moment of death, without any condition whatever, except that of simply dying." Leo's face showed surprise and looked as if crossed mo mentarily with hesitation. But the look passing, he replied blandly: "Yes, Archbishop, I can refuse you nothing in my power to grant. If it be found to be possible, I also give you this singular favor, to yourself and your companion only." On the return to America, Archbishop Seghers did not .hesitate to make use of the long-coveted privilege of returning to his beloved Indians; and supplying himself with the nec essary means of protection against the cold, for the winter season was fast advancing, and in company with an attend ant, whose name was Frank, he made his way along the banks of the Yukon, visiting the old and founding new missions. But the time of his martyrdom was near at hand, and on a cold November mornin...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

The Indian Advocate. 191 "- - 111 J Rev. Father Gratian, O. S. B., is stationed at Thurber, Tex. Rev. Father Justin, O. S. B., returned to Louisiana last month. Five children will make their first Holy Communion here on June 1. What is the matter with our constable? , Why does he not arrest the loafers who indulge in indiscriminate shooting and disturbing the public peace? It is reported that the Benedictine Fathers of Nqw Subiaco, Ark., are to establish a Monastery of their order at Muenster, in the Diocese of Dallas, Texas. Mr. Joseph Laracy, brother of our postmaster (Bro. John), has ar rived here from New Jersey, and is now engaged in opening up the farm which he purchased in this vicinity last year. Fort Hall Reservation, belonging to the Shoshone and Bannock Indians, including 400,000 acres, will, according to the President's procla mation, be opened to white settlers July 17th. It is predicted that the Choctaws and Chickasaws will reject the alterations made at Washington in ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

'imrm'f iigriM" fw'tp-Jitw'i,m'iuyijipj'Ljj 192 The Indian Advocate. zenship, remarks the Catholic Columbian. If half of the millions of dollars wasted on the Indian Bureau, with all its connections of agencies, com missions and non-sectarian schools, were given for five years to the "black gown" missionaries, then in two generations all the aborigines of this country would be civilized, Christianized and turned into intelligent and industrious citizens. Our base ball club is gradually getting into shape for the season. The boys are improving, both in fielding and batting, and are now taking "hot shots" from the bat without flinching. They also appear to be more conversant with the rules, and show better judgment in cutting off runners, "double plays" being frequent. They have been victors in several match games recently with neighborhood nines. The outlook for bountiful crops still remains promising, especially for corn. The rainfall, at present writing, appears to be a little in e...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

Vol. XIV. The Indian Advocate JULY, 1902. THE FOURTH OF JULY, Hail our country's natal morn! Hail our spreading kindred born! Hail thou banner, not yet torn! Waving o'er the free. While this day, in festal throng, Millions swell the patriot song, Shall not we thy notes prolong, Hallowed jubilee? Who would sever freedom's shrine? Who would draw the invidious line? Though by birth, one spot be mine, Dear is all the rest. Dear to me the South's fair land, Dear the central mountain band, Dear New England's rocky strand, Dear the prairied West. By our altars, pure and free, By our law's deep-rooted tree, By the past dread memory, By our Washington. By our common parent tongue, By our hopes, bright, buoyant, young, By the tie of country, strong, We will still be one. Fathers! have ye bled in vain? Ages! must ye droop again? Makerl shall we rashly stain Blessings sent by Thee? No! receive our solemn vow, While before Thy throne we bow, Ever to maintain as now Union, Liberty. No. 7

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

194 The Indian Advocate. innitmt iii4 mm I $? tt 4? I tt 4f 4? :i The Chickasaws, j 4? 4? 1 j 4? 4? 4 HE Chickasaws. like their neighbors, the Choc- I taws, were located in Mississippi before their re moval to the Indian lerntory, and occupied tnat portion of the State which at the present time bears the names of some of their most distin guished warriors Pontotoc, Pickins, Tisho mingo, etc. This territory had been ceded to them at an early date, but by and by the onward tide of civilization demanded either their recogni tion of the laws and customs of the white man or their removal to a point further west. Choosing what they thought the least of the two evils, they entered into a treaty with the United States, represented by Gen. John Coffee, Oct. 20, 1832, whereby they agreed to dispose of their lands in Mississippi and move to that region known as the Indian Territory. Accordingly arrangements were perfected, and the majority of the Chickasaws took their departure for the new lan...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

The Indian Advocate 195 their distinctive house names, the descent being traceable backward through the mother's ancestry. No sooner had the Chickasaw emigrants settled among their Choctaw brethren in the Indian Territory than they be came aware of the fact that their minority (in number) would forever exclude them from representation in the gen eral council. Accordingly, they entered into a treaty with the Choctaws on January 17, 1837, whereby they were to have the privilege of forming a district of their own within th limits of the Choctaw domain. They were also to be en titled to all the rights and privileges of the Choctaws with the exception of participating in the annuities. They weie to control and manage the residue of their funds, and select such officers for that purpose as they thought proper. In the division of lands which ensued the Chickasaws, figuratively speaking, "won the toss," otherwise became possessors of the fertile portion of the country, a tract of land perha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

196 The Indian Advocate. lieu three-fourths of their own revenue (which is merely nom inal so far as coal is concerned). By the above it will be seen that the Chickasaws are de cidedly better traders than their Choctaw brethren. The Chickasaw Nation lies within the boundaries of the Canadian and Red Rivers on the north and south, and the Choctaw Nation and Western Reservations on the east and west. Its area in square miles is 7,267, with an acreage of 4,640,935. Whether taken as an agricultural or a grazing , country, the Chickasaw Nation cannot be surpassed. The valley of the Washita is the most productive body of land in North America, yielding in ordinary seasons from fifty to eighty-five bushels of corn to the acre, with an equal propor tion of small grain. ' The Chickasaws have not, like the Choctaws, adopted the negro freedmen owned by them before the war; and in this instance it appears that they have demonstrated superior statesmanship, as the rapidity with which the negroes...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

The Indian Advocate 197 after that of the Choctaws. The principal executive officer, however, is styled "Governor" instead of Principal Chief. This change was wrought at the adoption of the Constitution in 1856. The nation is divided into four counties Panola, Pickins, Pontotoc and Tishomingo, each of which returns three Senators and eight Representatives. The legislature convenes annually at Tishomingo, the capital, on the first Wednesday in September, and usually continues for one month. Business is principally or has been up till re cently conducted in the English language through the aid of an interpreter, but the disfranchisement of the white citi zens has materially changed the aspect of the body legisla tive, which during the years prior to this revolution had risen to a higher plane than any body of law-makers in the Indian Territory. The House and Senate are now composed of full bloods. The Governor's cabinet is composed of National Secretary, National Agent, Treasurer and ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

198 The Indian Advocate. abiding people. Notwithstanding their proximity to Texas, there is little or no whisky introduced to their capital during the legislature a statement which cannot be truthfully uttered when referring to some other legislative bodies- in the Terri tory. As a people, however, the Chickasaws are not as sus ceptible to religious training as the Choctaws; but if deficient in this respect, they are certainly their equals intellectually. The Chickasaw full-bloods, however, are more superstitious than their neighbors; witch doctors and Pashofah dances being still popular in some localities. The dance of the "Pashofah," which is believed to be a certain cure in many stages of disease, is carried on in front of the patient, who is placed in a house facing the east, and only accessible to the Medicine Man, who performs his craft in secret. Meanwhile the guests dance with great energy, a young woman of the tribe jingling a few pebbles in a pair of terrapin shells sus pe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

The Indian Advocatc. 199 - ! &$? jj Neglected Catholic Indian 4"4ii Tribes Throughout Arizona. ljtijr - hhhw MONG the many Indian tribes who have come A under the benign influence of the Gospel, the iiauics ui willow, uuwcvci, uu uui cippccii 111 111c annual report of the "Indian and Negro Mis sions," are the Pima Indians, of Maricopa coun ty, Territory of Arizona. Yet there are hundreds of them who consider themselves Catholics, igno rant though they are of the Faith. At the request of the Rt. Rev. Bishop Bour gade, now most Rev. Archbishop of Santa Fe, the Franciscan Fathers of Sacred Heart Province, of St. Louis, Mo., have taken charge of all Catholics living in Ma ricopa county, since January, 1896, and have also given the Indians of the county as much attention as possible. Through entreaties of the Fathers residing at Phoenix, the Very Rev. Father Provincial was prevailed upon in January, 1901, to send a Father exclusively for the work among the Indians. Within Maricopa co...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

soo The Indian Advocate. have assembled there for common prayers every Saturday night and twice every Sunday, even though no priest cdiild visit them for months. Although there is the Phoenix Indian school, a magnifi cently equipped government institution, the Indians were continually clamoring for a Catholic school. Again charity was appealed to to buy the necessary material for a rough school building, and the Indians set to work to raise the walls for a school and a small dwelling for the teachers with four rooms. The foremost benefactress of all the work done is Rev. Mother Drexel. A regular Catholic school has been kept up under the greatest difficulties since February, 1900. The number of pupils kept on increasing, so that at present both the church and the school building are used for school purposes. In the larger building stands the altar. A broad partition separates it from the children during school hours. On Saturday this partition is removed, the desks carried out and t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

The Indian Advocate. 201 faith, they are very anxious to learn the truths of our relig ion. Thus these poor creatures make great sacrifices for the education of their children; whereas, if they would bring them to a government school, the government would provide for all. We have a number of such children from Casa Blanca, a station about twenty-five miles east of St. John's school. Probably most of these poor children will not be able to return next school year, simply because the parents are too poor to support them. They will have no crops this year, having had no rain nor water in the river to irrigate their fields. About two dollars would defray the expenses of keep ing one child for a month with some family living near the school. A bountiful opportunity, indeed, for such whom God has blessed with earthly goods to do a work of mercy towards the least of Christ's brethren. Only a mile from the Catholic school is located a prepara tory government school, whose teacher is an Indi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

202 The Indian Advocate. rant of the teachings of the Gospel. So far they have nei- ther church nor school of any kind in their midst. A very miserable Indian hut about 10 feet:long, 6 feet wide and 5 feet high is the only place that serves as a chapel. Although left to themselves for so many years, and 'even spoiled by some miserable whites, still the better class among them is anxious to have a church, day school and priest. They intend to begin this year with building'a little church and room for the priest. About fourteen miles this side of Gila Bend Reservation is another settlement of Papagoe Indians. All of these show a very good will. They also intend building a chapel for themselves this summer. Besides all these there are other Indian settlements, especially at Casa Blanca, Sacaton Flat, Sacaton and Black Water, as numerous and as desirous of the Gospel as the Indians of St.' John's Mission. All these stations 'should have a much larger chapel, and at least one Catholic da...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

The Indian Advocate 203 Father Sheridan's Success, ARMER Mentz sat on the broad steo to his door. """ with a forefinger on a favorite passage in Shake speare. Mentz was not a model tarmer, out witn a little effort he kept his family securely and de cently. In his youth he had ardently hoped for a thorough education, but one grinding care after another had removed his ambition forever out of his reach. He would read, though, and did until the people of the neighborhood in which he lived looked upon him as a prodigy of learning. So much effect had his wisdom upon them that, in 1867, the peo ple made Him sheriff of the county, an arduous position with small salary, but he saved from it sufficient to buy a good many books for his library, a three-ply Brussels carpet for his front room, and a pony of the broncho persuasion, a little beauty and warranted for unlimited' tricks. Of course, Mentz's reputation as a scholar improved with his friends, while the women of the hamlet held Mistress...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1902

204 The Indian Advocate. just come in right. Sheridan, come here. How would you like to go to college, Sheridan?" queried Mentz. "Why, I'd like it, you know, father." "And I'm going to start you inside of a week. We'll de cide what school to-night." "Where's the money to come from?" demanded the youth. "That's my part of the bargain," said the old man, grimly. Mentz did not wait until night to study over his plans. While he sat there on the step he thought of all the colleges and institutions in the State, and found himself mentally dis satisfied with either the location or influences. He did not intend his son should become dissipated; he must think of his future, and the old man went on toiling up height after height where he had in fancy already placed the youth. However, Sheridan seemed inclined to arrange about the college for himself. "You know John Dillon, father. He's going to St. Joseph's. He's the only boy in Caxton who treated me as if I were a human when you sent me to s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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