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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 January 1899

6 SPOKANE POULTRY SHOW. Theo. Hewes, one of the best judges of poultry in America, will be the judge at the Spokane poultry show to-be held January 24 to 28. A one and one-fifth fare on all roads has been made. Entrance fees shall be as follows: Single birds, 25 cents; pens, 50 cents additional, and collections, $1 additional. Rabbits, free; bantams, pigeons and other pet stock free. Free coops will be supplied by the association for all exhibits. The show will be governed by the rules and regu lations of the American Poultry Association, under which all non-weight classes are handicapped one and one-fifth points in favor of classes subject to weight, and solid colored varieties are handicapped one and one-fifth points in favor of parti-colored varieties in all sweepstake competitions. No exhibitor will be allowed under any circum stances to handle any birds except his or her own, except in presence of and with consent of the owner. Any infringement of this rule will debar the offen...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 January 1899

VINELAND NOTES. The combination of irrigation and brilliant sun shine in the fertile valleys of the Northwest pro duce some wonderful results. For example, most of the strawberry beds planted in Vineland last March bore strawberries enough in the following May and June for the family supply, and such an eminent authority as Robert Schleicher, whose fruit farm is within five miles of Vineland, under like conditions, states that his strawberries set in the fall produced a full crop during the following season. Eastern growers find this hard to be lieve when their experience teaches that a full crop is not to be expected until the second fruiting season. Vineland boasts many cherry, peach and pear trees which bore fruits the first season from planting. O. A. James has a peach tree set in March, 1897, that in August, 1898, yielded a bushel of fine fruit. One three-year-old Idaho pear tree near Vineland produced nineteen large, handsome fruits the third year from setting. The Vineland ch...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 January 1899

8 Ranch and Range ISSUED EVERY THURSDAY. In the interests of the Farmers, Hor ticulturists, and Stockmen of Washing ton, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah, British Columbia. Published by the Ranch and Range Company. Editorial Offices, - - Seattle, Wash. BUSINESS OFFICES Seattle 315-316 Pioneer Building. Spokane, Suite F Hypotheekbank Bldg. Subscription in advance, ?1.00 per year Address all comunications to Ranch and Range, 315-316 Pioneer building, Seattle, Washington. The circulation of Ranch and Range reaches, with this issue 7,000 copies. We claim the largest circulation of any farm paper west of Chicago and north of San Francisco, making this as a guarantee to our advertisers, who are extended a cordial invitation to cail and inspect our books, paper bills, etc., at any time. This journal carries the largest and best advertising patronage of any ag ricultural journal west of St. Paul or north of San Francisco —a high testi- monial to the sterling worth of Ranch and Range. DO NOT WAS...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 January 1899

cheese is shipped to all the towns of importance in Western Washington. California potatoes are exhibited in the markets of Portland and the Sound cities. It caps the climax, however, to see Oregon prunes shipped from the or chards to Portland, where they are re packed and sent back to the stores in the leading prune-bearing districts. EURAL MAIL DELIVERY. Postal Inspectors Houpt and Rath bone were in the city on Sunday, and had a long Interview with the carriers on the rural route. This service has developed wonderfully since its incep tion and has been made a permanency by the government. The inspectors found that over 200 boxes were used daily by suburban people, in many instances more than one family receiving mail in a particu lar box. The average route is 30 miles long—ls miles out and an equal dis tance back. For the present these routes will not be lengthened. It uses up nearly every hour of daylight now to get around the circuit. In the spring some additional boxes may be p...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 January 1899

10 HOW I EAISE WHEAT. We reproduce below further an swers to the queries on wheat culture by practical farmers of the Inland Em pire: THE QUESTIONS. 1. What varieties of wheat are grown in your community, and what is fche relative importance o». each va riety? 2. What are the advantages and dis advantages of these varieties? 3. Which is most commonly prac ticed, fall or spring sowing? 4. Is summer fallowing practiced, and how often? 5. How do the best farmers in your community handle their summer fal low? 6. Are you bothered wtih wild oats or any serious pests in wheat fields? 7. How may these pests best be com batted? 8. How do you treat wheat for smut? 9. Do you raise any crop on summer fallow? 10. How much seed per acre do you sow? 11. When do you plow and how deep? 12. What method of harvesting do you prefer, by header, binder or com bined harvester? 13. Do you prefer a seeder or drill, and why? K. F. DYER, ROSALIA. 1. Winter wheat, Red Amber and Jones Fife, Club, Red Chaff and ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 January 1899

RELATIVE VALUE OF BOOTS AND SILAGE. One of the most interesting discus sions brought out at the recent dairy meeting at Ellensburg was on the relative value of roots and silage. But one mistake the advocates of roots made was in assuming that, if it cost til) cents to produce a ton of roots and $1.20 to produce a ton of sil age, then roots are more profitable than silage. The fact is, a ton of sil age has much more nutriment in it than a ton of rots, and may hence cost more per ton and yet be cneaper. A feed may do one or all of four things in a ration. (1) It furnishes nutriment. (2) It may help to bal ance the ration. (3) It may make the ration more palatable and thus cause the cow to eat more of it. (4) It may have a physiological effect on the bowels such that a larger amount of food may be digested. It is plain, therefore, that linseed oil meal, for in stance would be worth more in the Palouse country where protein is scarce, than in Yakima, where protien is too abundant; for i...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 January 1899

12 HOABD ON STATE DAIRYMEN. In the last number of Hoard's Dairj^nan, appears a column review of the recent Dairymen's meeting by Hon. W. D. Hoard. In part he said: "Although the industry is as yet in an infant condition in Washington, it was made very evident to us that it is in the hands of a most plucky and intelligent class of farmers. "The address of President Stevens, which we hope ere long to present to our readers, was a model of concise and up-to-date dairy thought and sug gestion. Mr. Stevens himself is a thoroughly posted dairy farmer and a breeder of dairy cattle, and need not take a back seat for any man, in any state, for the manner and thorough ness with which he demonstrates his theory and practice. He has one of the best business herds of Jerseys at the head of the Yakima Valley, that we have visited in many a day. Pro fessor W. J. Spillman, Director of the Washington Experiment Station at Pullman, was the moving spirit of the convention, and was requested by Mr. Ste...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 January 1899

MARKET REPORT. SEATTLE. The following prices are being offer ed to the producer by the local dealers for delivery in round lots on the dock or in the car at Seattle: Trade in the vegetable market is good. Potatoes are easier and lower; not nlany coming in. Potatoes —Native Burbanks, $16-?18; Yakima Burbanks, |18-$2 O. Many of the apples coming in are of a poorer quality. This accounts a good deal for the lower quotations on apples. Apples—Fancy, 75c@$l; very fancy, $1@51.50; apples, cooking, 25@50. To quote them in another way, they are; Bellflower, 25@50; King, 24@40; Spitzenberg, 75(5>51.50; Baldwin, 50@ $1: Gloria Mundi, 25@50; Greenings, 25@50. Celery, 40c per dozen; hot house let tuce, 40c; onions, silverskins, 12@18; cabbage, 11/£@2cI 1 / £@2c per pound for native; parsnips, 75c per sack. Cauliflower, 60@$l per doz; turnips, 50c per sack;Merced sweets, 2%c; car rots, 50c per sack; beets, 75c per sack; cranberries $7@s9 per bbl; pumpkins, lc; squash, iy 2 @1%. The hide and w...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 January 1899

14 FOR SALE—A BLOODED PIG. Stockmen who are always looking for bargains will not fail to be interested in the following from the Hood River (Ore.) Glacier: I wish to advertise a pig we have for sale through your valuable paper. The pig was pur chased six or eight weeks ago by W. H. Perry from Joe Purser of Hardscrabble. It was then 8 months old and weighed 30 pounds. After being brought home he was given a bath of soft soap and kerosene and well rubbed with a scrubbing brush, and came out so beautiful and curly that he was forthwith named Joe Hardscrabble. He was carefully placed in a pen prepared for him, and from that time on for several weeks was given the best that Boscobel could produce. But the change from Hardscrabbling to high living did not improve him a great deal, as he still held his own. . Being very proud of my new curiosity, no one was allowed to leave the place without taking a lock at it, and various were the opinions in regard to it. We were advised to examine its ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 January 1899

Apples My Specialty Scions on all stock cut from bearing trees; tested in this state. Yakima Nursery J A-WCL, Trees We have our own nursery and sell you trees thnt we guarantee to bo FREE FROM DISEASE AND TRUE TO NAME. Nursery, 423 East Union; seed store and pack- Ing grounds, 1123 Second avenue. : Puget Sound Nursery & Seed Co., ' iC. N. Sandahl, Mngr., Seattle. SEEDS GROWN IN STATE OF WASHINGTON Pride of Washington Peas, Blue Im perial, American, Alpha and Marrow fat; ■',"All Seasons" Cabbage,' Salsify, Shepard Radish, Hanson and Salaman der Lettuce, Coffee Pea, staple varieties Beans, Russian and White Sunflower. J. W. B. DAHLL, Waterville, Wn THE ARGUS Publishes All the political news, gossip and items of general interest. $2 Per Year. Advertising Rates on Application 630 New York Block, Seattle, Wash. Printed Parchment =: -:- BUTTER PAPER CREAMERVMEN are urged to write us for -: -:- fimukkh and bampi.kb -:- . Catalogs : Phicklists of Nurserymen Stockmen, etc., a specialty -...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 January 1899

SUCCESS! SIMPLE This is the magic word that encourages us all. The That is what one of our customers says about the most successful man is the one who uses the most advan- process of heating milk with our Ideal Milk Heater. tageously the means provided in his especial line. In *^ other words, a successful man will promote his success Xt is a*" ''•'W Ascription; sort of gathers up all by the use of machinery that has proved successful. the facts and boils ****+ " into one word *Tpt«|r^ sbrOW It can be used either on -ie pump or gravity system. It makes no noise. It requires little room. It can be Is the most successful creamery machine of recent years. quickly attached. It is easy to clean. You should be posted in regard to it. You should see that it is a part of your creamery equipment. We are glad to put them in on trial where charges : are paid. It churns exhaustively. It works thoroughly. Booklet giving full description sent on application. Prices quoted on application. . , ;;j ....

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 February 1899

Library frAhCH And Range -^T ' ISSUED EVERY WEEK *$fr ,: I Vol. 4, No. 46 CARDS NOT TRUMPS. While the U. S. Separator shows testimonial letters from the following Agricultural Experiment Stations: lowa, Minnesota, Cornell and Massachusetts, bear in mind that the De Laval Separator is blessed with letters likewise and of a more recent date,^as~thejollowing testify: / . ■..-; bur,;-:.-. i>.-.->. .: : Massachusetts Agricultural College. Cornell University Experiment Station. - Ti Amheret, «Mass., Jan 12, 1898. $ W» '■'" Ithaca, N. V., Jan. 10, 1898. "We have used a De Laval'Baby'; No. 3 separator daily in "** "After another year's experience I ' see no ; reason to alter our Dairy School during the past several terms, separating the opinion regarding the 'Alpha' De Laval separators express from 600 lbs. to 1200 lbs. of milk at a run, and with an aver- ed by me a year ago, which was^as follows: age speed of 6812 rev. per minute have obtained an average "Being asked to revise the su...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 February 1899

2 % Do you Contemplate the Purchase of a new Threshing Rig % jo%fc This year? Would it not -■ be wise to investigate as to whose machinery gives the best satisfaction on ~^£ f^ this coast? If so write us for Catalogue, flailed free,on application. ? - .^"Mo"' '- *^ £ Engines, Fli& 7 Threshers, |l Idling tfET Mi-UJ r JIdCKCIS, Saw Mills, HorsePowerss ■* THE" RUSSELL" COMPOUND TRACTION ENOINE TAKES TBE LEAD, f -^•: It is built in several sizes and is a wood and straw burner. > Write for particulars. '*' • n:;?l % Russell & Co., - Portland, Ore. % 2&i 320-324 Belmont St. and 160-166 East First St. jig* Jf^ls. Kill the Bug's! §n^ IIW ■ J' Vr most complete line of C|* rV PlimnS 'ncludimg ..... V^-J^^Jl W iarß p y p ' #i^«^'. I i ilk I] Hydraulic Sprayers Also Pumps for Whitewashing |;| ~'\ V |KJ ; BJf |pf Pumps fitted in any way wanted. Send for circular. - W&^^^"S- J>i '^WKF v|^ p iM^MiM Pnl <nri = 1 iriti H w CTn ho. Ms m our standard spray l^Ul^Ull YY -llLyil....

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 February 1899

RANCH AND RANGE Vel. 4, No. 46 TEAE OFF ,THE MASK! BT ADAM M. STEVENS. I notice it is reported that process butter is being sold in the markets of the state as Washington creamery but ter, and parties selling it seem to think dairymen are too particular in asking that it should be branded for what it is. Now, the dairymen and creamery men demand that all their dairy prod ucts be marked or branded and that no oleaginous substance or compound shall be made in imitation of yellow butter or sold as such. Now, when it is asked that process or renovated but ter be marked or branded when offered for sale in the markets of the state, it is objected by the venders of said reno vated butter that it is class legislation. A law that effects all law-abiding citi zens beneficially cannot be called class legislation. The constitution of the United States gives no person a right to commit a fraud. The rights of all consumers of dairy products are safe-guarded by requiring that process or renovated ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 February 1899

4 PRUNE DRYING. By J. P. McMinn, of Walla Walla, be fore Northwest Fruitgrowers' Asso ciation. Before describing my process of dry ng, perhaps it would not be amiss to give you a short description of my Iryer in order that you can better un lerstand my method. The main building is elevated six feet and has a large porch at each end. At one end of the front porch is a dip ping room, with other small rooms for 3torage purposes and a large closet for a, bleacher. Under the main building and at one side of the furnace room is a large bin six feet wide and extending the full length of the dryer; this serves as the receptacle for the dried fruit as it is emptied from the trays. The dryer is composed of two sep arate kilns, placed end to end and each kiln is 10 trays long, 14 high and 2 wide, giving each a capacity of 280 trays and 560 for both. Each kiln has DR. N. G. BLALOCK. President Northwest Fruitgrowers' Association. its own furnace, which is at the out side end, between the two kil...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 February 1899

through a tunnel-shaped dryer with graduated heat, starting at a low tem perature, and increasing to 175 to 200. This prevents dripping also. Where prunes are put in an evaporator with a high temperature to start, they are more liable to drip, and cause quite a loss. Prof. Balmer stated that during the past season he had visited the leading prune districts of Southwestern Wash ington, and Western Oregon, and found that the science of evaporation was yet in an experimental stage. Nearly ev ery grower was employing different methods from his neighbors. Evapor ators were built and next year it may be that the grower finds that the sys tem is not entirely satisfactory, and he tears it all out and reconstructs it ac cording to new principles. These con stant changes have been very costly to the growers. Prof Balmer asserted that the system of steam drying would eventually be adopted, as it could be regulated better than other systems. Mr. Allen stated that he has equip ped 100 evaporator...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 February 1899

adiocre box of fruit. It is difficult, met imos, to find just the right size i peaches or apples to fill a box, but would be better to leave the box un led upon the packing table, than to I it with varying sizes only to blast c chances of the balance of an other se good shipment. In many pack g houses I have seen the packers us g but one box at a time and placing erein fruit that should be graded to three classes, as to size, and each iss placed in a box of the proper pro ■rtions. By using several boxes, of fferent sizes, at one time the packer ft place each fruit where it belongs, d when the boxes are filled each will fcsent an even and regular appear ;ce. And below a certain unwritten kv, well known to all of us, as to the aallest size that fruit can be classed i marketable, and below that stand d we must not choose, but throw fay. By throw away Ido not neces rily imply waste. Undersized fruit n be profitably disposed of, for one iy, by feeding to pigs. In proof of is assertion I ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 February 1899

work. And in this business, as in all other lines, no laggards are wanted, and if any exist, they will, ere long, be left far in the rear by the progressive element that studies the wants of the people, conforms to their desires and thus gains a competence for itself. Another important subject in reference to the packing of fruit must not be overlooked. I refer to the branding of our packages. I presume all of us when we first put our produce on the markets, used a stencil and the old familiar lamp-black dauber to brand our boxes. The objections to this method are many: It is difficult to hold the stencil firmly enough to se cure a distinct impression, it is more difficult to secure uniformity in the color of the impression, and, when made, the impression is always easily blurred when anything touches it, making it unsightly and very untidy in appearance. The expense of a steel die is now so slight, boxmakers have all seen the necessity of their use so clearly, and now makes no char...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 February 1899

8 Ranch and Range ' ISSUED EVERY THURSDAY. I In the interests of the Farmers, Hor ticulturists, and Stockmen of Washing ton, Oregon, idauo, Montana, Utah, .British Columbia. by the Ranch and Range Company. Offices, - - Seattle, Wash. IVK'jMnuu- Hijwii lull. Lung Uiutttuce connection f BUSINESS OFFICES 'Seattle 315-316 Pioneer Building. Spokane, Su.te F Hypotheekbank Bldg. i, _ in advance, Ifl.OO per year ji ■Address all comunications to Ranch < and Range, 315-316 Pioneer building, .' Seattle, Washington. I A. B. Leckenby, in charge of the ex perimental work of the Division of Grasses on the Pacific coast, has gone to Washington City, where he has been tailed to confer with the Secretary of Agriculture, James Wilson, regarding the enlargement of the department's Operations in the new west. Mr. Leckenby will probably touch Upon the fact that some of the experi ment stations of the Nortnwest can be taade very much more useful by relo cating and placing them in more fa vorable distri...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 2 February 1899

C~ s~222^S^5L2' n'«'i^^ in price and we; ) MUILIJI I.ILU-JMlllflll. GUARANTEE TO PLEASE YOU IN QUALITY < ffpimo - IFllmirl" What more could we do? Our catalogue tells all, < Ki^ iiP 9 r> r^i BY B^ and Is devoted largely to practical matters pertaining C li*^*l=3Kßsff.W IB A lIEH to poultry raising. Has 143 pages; mailed to any \S ■ • Ifjgj^'flfr, It M■■£AM I W address for Gc. No wild and woolly statements toy C H ,1T"!,, ' J IB l^MM^r'mm^ m* ___ __ __^ outfits, nor prize package lots to < I A IlaWI^IIaTl) AT/IIIC : offer.-Fair treatment, prompt < 4& -" ' JWk i I 111 I IK A I Ll|#^| service and full value arc what I V&s!BikJ£te~£3Bj&<& Mil \J WMM ri ■ mflVitF we try to give our customers. , ) vEwESSSSb!''^ DES MOINES INCUBATOR CO. Box 543, Dcs Molnes, lowa. ing that Spokane's citizens paid all the bills. Through the courtesy of the North ern Pacific Railway there was tendered to the citizens of the Lewiston valley a special train. L. A. Porter, the w...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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