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Elephind.com contains 66,432 items from Day Book, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 26 December 1911

f net a holiday today. The mem bers will not be required to meet the president until January 2. Boston, birthplace of patriot ism, is all "het up" because ele mentary schools have adopted an Englishman's "patriotic reader." Indianapolis federal attaches attaches today commenced ar rangement of evidence to be pre sented to U. S. grand jury in vestigating McNamara dynamit ing conspiracy. Theodore Roosevelt will'not be a guest at the peace banquet to be held at Waldorf-Astoria, N. Y., next Saturday night, President Taft, Andy Carnegie and Elbert H. Gary will be the speakers. The reason Roosevelt wont be a guest is that he ain't invited. General Bernardo Reyes, fa mous general and statesman and late bugaboo of the Madero ad ministration, has surrendered himself to the Mexican govern ment. " Reyes was deserted by his troops, and in surrendering, ad mitted that the people we're not with him in his desire for a revo lution. "General Reyes will be brought to Mexico City and treated with all...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 26 December 1911

mmmm THIS' LORD -'NAMED AS CO-RESPONDENT oiitirch Christmas tree and held Christmas exercises to empty pews. Rev. Mueller ancl his con gregation have been engaged in differing for some time. o o DANCE ENDS IN ROW George Newman was- fined $10 .and costs and James Hogan and Charles Barry, $1 and costs each, by Judge Uhler this morning, on a charge of fighting at a dance in Turner hall, 12th and Western, Saturday night. The entertainment was given by the wagon drivers of the Chi cago Evening American, and trouble developed early in the. evening. Detectives Parker and Feeny of the Maxwell street station were notified that1 two men had been stabbed at the hall, and were sent there to preserve or der. The injured men were re moved to the hospital before the arrival of the officers, and their .assailants were not caught. It was 1:45 when the two de tectives entered the-hall. Accord ing to Parker, Newman attacked him without provocation. -Parker drew his billy, to subdue New man, and then B...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

THE DAY BOOK 500.SO. PEORIA ST. 398 TEL. MONROE 353 Vol. 1, No.78 Chicago, Wednesday, Dec. 27,, 1911 One Cent HOW BEEF TRUST GULPED THREE HUNDRED MILLION WORTH OF COMPETITION Yeeder Tells of Taking Over of Two Companies When Billion Dollar Trust Tirst Was Planned $500,000, 000 of Water to $200,000,000 Stock. xBit by bit the truth about the "high finance", operations of the millionaire packers is coming to light. in, Judge Carpenter's court. Xhe-.gqvefnment today proved "by 'Albert H. Veeder, corporation -attorney- and ''father" of the Beef Trust," 'that' in 1902 ,the packers entered no a' gigantic conspir acy, to control the packing indus try of the world. This, they attempted to do by the formation of -a company, the capital stock vof which was, to have been $773,567,000, of which $591,000,000 Was. ''water." , . The formation of this company jn 1902 fell through, not because of the panic 6f 1903 as already claimed by ,the defense, but be cause E. H. Harriman and, the other eastern ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

federal court, is an extremely edi fying spectacle. Veeder today produced the rec ords leading up to the formation of the National Packing com pany. He was question by Attor ney Pierce Butler, for the govern ment. Butler, first, attempted to find out what the name of the as sociation under which the packers met was. Veeder said at first he did not remember any .name. Butler wished to know how the meet ing were called, in that case. Veeder said the meetings were not called under any name, but by communications addressed to "P. O. Box 247?" Veeder said that was the only name ever used by the secretary either in calling meetings, or in referring to meetings. Veeder then told how the "Big Three' (the Armour group, the Swift group, and the Morris group) decided early in 1902 that they would form a huge trust. . He told of the application to Harriman of a loan of $90,000,000 which was needed by the packers to buy up a number of competing companies. v He said that the whole proposi tion wa...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

ments showed that one of the Na tional Packing company subsi diaries lost $1,500,000 in one year, it actually made a profit of $5, 000 in the three years before the loan was repaid. Sidelights 'were also shown on the amiable' way in which the packers believed in each other to day. Two companies, The Bimbler, Van Wagner & Co of Newark, N. J., and the L. M. Anthony Co., of Fall River, Mass., were local companies, which were controlled by Gustavus Swift. When the proposal for the combine came, one of the first suggestions made at a meeting of "P. O. Box 247" was' that Swift should sell these companies to the combine. '"It was proposed that Mr: Swift sell these properties so he could not obstruct a business in which he had "been concerned," said Veeder. ' "What do you mean by 'ob struct?' " asked Attorney Butler. "I don't know," replied Veeder, "unless I mean 'interfere with.' " A little more questioning by Butler brought out that what Mr. Veeder meant was that the .Ar mour and Morr...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

bother you." . After his place was closed Foster said he met Wheeler in Chief McWeeney's office. The chief said to the witness: "Such men as you (meaning Foster) are worse than the lowest dogs, taking money from girls, and paying it out to protect your vice." Foster said that when he asked Chief McWeeny what he thought of Wheeler and the others charg ed with accepting the graft the chief replied they were worse if they took it. The witness did not say that he had ever said protection money directly to Inspector Wheeler, but charged. Wheeler with getting a part of that paid to Bonfield. "I went to Wheeler's office and told him I wanted to run," he said. "He told me I couldn't. I said I had paid protection money to Bonfield, and that he had got his share of it. I told him I knew he had." Foster said he had conducted the Hubbard court place from 1908 until early in 1911. He said he had paid thousands of dollars during the three years. His place was closed once by DetectivesJ McCarthy a...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

-THE NEWSPAPERS ON STREET CAR SERVICE . The Chicago Journal has lately been taking a daily slam at the traction interests. The Examiner, on Tuesday, said : "The elevated interests are now paying the penalty of initial overcapitalization and utter failure to maintain their properties on a good service basis. The city will not j)ay their depreciation bills witha-stroke of the pen. "Worse still, the elevated interests have not even kept their pledges of service betterments as a rsult of their recent" financial merger. They have broken their pledge to install through routes and give transfers. "In dealing wtih these people the city "cannot forget that the worst overcrowding on any of the city's traction lines is on the ele vated roads and that it is deliberate, since, there are now no ob stacles to immediate through routes. "It was one of Yerke's favorite tricks to make service as bad as possible in order that public clamor would coerce the Council into new franchisei bounties. It is an...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

aware of the rotten service they get, for good money, and don't need 'editorials to tell them something they already know. But, just the same, it's refreshing occasionally, to read some thing in these papers that shows they are finding out that there are people in existence outside of the advertising field. Some people will wonder why v the Journal, Examiner and Tribune, if they were on the level, didn't keep up a daily hammering on the traction company to give the people what they were paying for. ' . Can it be that they are now hammering rotten street car condi tioners a blind behind which to push the subway job through before the people 'wake up and assert their right to a voice in"vhat is to 'be done. The subway requires not only city streets, but, according to present plans, is to he started with the people's money. So it makes no difference from what angle you view it, it is a people's question. Whether the people will demand the right to do their own thinking, or let the dail...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

Reviewing Jawn's past life, we don't blame him- for beinsr-'care-ful. ' . .' "Vatican has refused1 positively to grant Count Boni de Castel lane annulment of his mairiage to Anna Gould, now Duchess of Talleyrand. - Scores of Persians are being tried by Russian court, martial on charge of having fired on Czar's troops. Expected they all Will be condemned to death. ' 'Cardinal Farley was granted farewell audience by. Pope. Pius today. He sails for N, Y. Jan uary 3. 18 lodgers afMunicipal Night Shelter, Berlin, are dead of pto maine poisoning caused by Christinas .feastof smoked her ring: Tewfik Pasha, Turkish ambas sador to London, has declined of fer of grand viziership of Otto man Empire. Can you blame him? Wm. J. Carey, representative in Congress from 4th Wis., dist rict, has announced his candi dacy for mayor of Milwaukee, against Emil Seidel, Socialist in cumbent. Len Small thinks primary law has turned government over to "thoughtlessvmobs." The "thoughtlessness" of the 'mobs dou...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

2 i someone to tell President Taft he isn't a felon "because he has paid everything back." David Shoppenagon, chief of the Michigan Chippewa's, died at age of 105 yesterday. (Also at Bay City, Mich.) Violet Edmands, rich nance of Rev. C. V. T. Richeson, has left home to become settlement work er in New York. Nevertheless, the law does not look upon a common burglar, as any the less a burglar if he hap- nen to suffer from attack of senti ment after he has been found J out and return the stolen goods. Of course, with a banker, it doubtless is different. Jacob and Hess Hembree, brothers, fought pistol duel be fore their . mother at Wheat, Tehn., which ended only -when Hess dropped dead. Kansas City, Kas., is going to prohibit use of men dressed as Santa Claus in future. One of the fake Santas promised boy supply of toys Monday, and then didn't deliver. ' ' John W. Cook, Lawrenceburg, Ind., went rabbit hunting, and worked his gun by string attach ed to trigger. He managed to crawl to hi...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

LEARNING TO HANBLE YOtJR1 FISTS ABE' VATTELL' n f. GIVES'AfiyipE.QN PEFENSET . ,'. K - J Attell blocking left and countering with,right. (Featherweight Charnpidn Abe 'Attell is the hero of more f than. 250 battles in the' squared .ring. Hehas come-up from the bottom round of the ladder through sheer. ability. At first he' was a knock out fighter, but quickly picked up' cleverness until he is today heatf and shoulders Oyer-most of the so called clever, boxers. In today's story he explains ;the .defensive side of boxing. Editor.) . ' By Abe Attell.' Featherweight Champion. I have engaged in about 250 bouts since I .began boxing and what I have to say here, about the defensive side of the sport, ex plains the methods I. follow. Having learned position, the yqung boxer should-take up the defense. Beginners invariably overlook one. important part of defense guarding , the body. 3Vhena'b'low is sliot' toward a

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

'! i beginner, he usually covers Tiis face, leaving his body the most vulnerable part exposed. There are several methods of defense, some being peculiar to individuals, but the three most important are blocking, ducking and sidestepping. To block a blow, use the right arm, when possible. Always re member this arm is mainly for defense and the left chiefly for delivering punches. When a blow is started and you mean to block it, shoot the right arm up so it catches your opponent's punching arm, under the forearm. This lifts his arm from its course and swings him around a trifle. Watch this shift ing action. It usually puts a man in position for you to deliver an effective punch. Keen sight is necessary in blocking, for you must figure u stantly where the blow is aimed, especially if your opponent uses a punch like the famous "cork screw," which seems to be aimed for oife place, only to land at an other. It will be hard to judge blows at first, but the knack win soon come to you. When ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

wmmmmmmm INDIAN-GIVING AS A FINE ART Employes of the Common wealth Edison Company, from the office boy to the president, are to be made beneficiaries under a service annuity system which the company will establish Jan. 1. Continuous service on the part of the employes for a stated number , of years will entitle them on re tirement to an annuity based on their annual earnings and on the pumber of years of continuous service. The plan, which t has been recommended by the public pol icy committee of the National Electrict Light Association, pro vides that the entire annuities be paid by the company, without any contribution on tht part of the employes. It provides also that the annuities shall not be consid ered any part of the wages of the employes nor any philanthropic scheme of the company. It is a form of compensation for faithful service which cannot be included within ordinary wages. News Item. A news item that reads nice and sounds good and makes a fel low feel like cracking his...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

ous service is trie price demand ed to get on the pension roll. Small wages, long hours and bad conditions must be put up with. If the' employes object either as individuals or collec tively, they get canned, and the continuous service pension re quirement becomes impossible. Who has been the gainer? No one has ever claimed that any corporation advocating or contemplating the adoption of any pension scheme was actuated by philanthropic motions, big business being noted for driving hard bargains. "Briefly stated the plan divides the employes into three classes those who have reached the age of 55 years and have thirty years' or morecontinuous service to their credit; those who have reached the age of 60 years with fifteen years' servicer and those who have reached -the age of 65 years with fifteen years' service to their credit." Let employers devote less time to figuring out dope on how to beat the future, by putting more time and attention to their em ployes' present needs.. Let th...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

"CHERISH-. YOUR". AMBITION'," ADVISES .GRAND OPERA, l SINGERSHE'S HAD EXPERIENCE r7 t " ; rfJwWzMm 'S,uw,3TOCXJ " Alma Gluck, as "Mirni" in "La Bpheme." New York, Dec: 26:' 'Cher ish your abitibn. .No "matter what obstacles seem to intervene, keep your ideal beforeyou, and i you have in you the ability, to do" what your heart desires, your op portunity will -almost surely come." , p a That is the- advice of Alma Gluck to every girl who a,spires to a career, to a life work of any sort. Her own rise to a foremost place in the musical world was from a depth of poverty, and an opposition of circumstances. Alma Gluck was reared'ambng the tenements" jof New "York's Alma Gluck, .Soprano. lower East Side, provided for the necessities of life. She sang at the Metropolitan opera, hotse after studying music only two years, and her appearance on that stage

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

vas the first time she had ever sung in public. Says Miss Gluck in telling her story: "My sister brought me, an orphan, from Roumania, when P was 6. From the time I was a little girl, I was crazy to study music, but my sister said 'no'. "For one thing, she could-not afford lessons for me; for another thing, she thought a musical ca reer meant going straight to the devil. "I graduated from the high school when I was 15, and, as I could not study music, I began to study law. I went to work in a law office, studying both in and out of Office hours. Before I was 17, 1 had matriculated at the New York law school. Soon afterward I married, Bernard Gluck. "Marriage ended my legal career, and began a very happy home life. My little girl, Abigail, came, and for nearly four years so filled my existence that I thought of little else. "All the time, however, at the back of my mind, was the desire to be a singer. I cherishecHt, and 'bided my time, doing what seem ed best and wisest from day to d...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

mmmmmmjmmmimmjm T'ORCEDO W.ED BY, GUN ' SHE SAYS W v jSypvj Mrs. Abraham Hammerstein. New York, Dec. 27. ,Miss Mirian Henrique, billed in vaude ville asv "The Great American iBeauty" says.she's going to "raise the particular dickens with that Hammerstein family." In private life she is Mrs. Ab raham Hammerstein, daughter-in-law to the impresario. The oth er day she appeared in court and asked for three warrants against her husband, charging bigamy, non-support and attempted mur der. Mrs. Hammerstein. explained her request for the , attempted murder warrant by saying that she was forced into marriage at the point of a gun. ' Locking the barndoor after the horse is gone is sometimes play ing a good joke on thev thief in case he brings the critter back. POLICE GUARD L C. LINES, FOLLOWING. WRECK The entire suburban system of the Illinois. Central is under guard by police and private de tectives today as a result of the wrecking of three passenger trains and a freight and an alleg ed att...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

OSCAR GETS THE USUAL KIND OF CHRISTMAS CIGARS HEfte, MR OSGA-R, ARE SOME "Pretty oqars For you. MfcRRY Christ- v MASS - x TANK YOU, . ' )333)H.L'P(CKie3, TANK YOU J JJER ?IRl-. SHE KNOWS HOW I SNCMOY A QOOT &MOKB. A- 'tA Effluvia N J) GJMSHoe A-" so .dot iss 43ER BRAND.' Y tfdBriMMMMail

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

, .' - , .'v riii kT - F THE DAILY SHORT STORY Brothers. By the flickering light of the brushwood "fire, Clarence of Keo kuk read the column headed "Vanity Fair."- Hamburg and the Shoshone -'Tough and the others listened withjanguid inter est, interjecting here and there facetious remarks orient the foibles of the "rich. "Here's a j4ame wot wore a peck of green diamonds to a dago prince's ball," dbserved Clarence of Keokuk. "Now one of them sparklers would V kept this bunch in hay and oats for a year. '.Tain't right it ain't !" Thev others chuckled their ac quiescence aiid one brought crum bh'rigerice rails to make a bon nier fire. Clarence of Keokuk turned again to the column' of Vanity Fair, and as he read his scowl became deeper. "Here's u lady wid four hy phens in her name went and give a pink ball and strung a yard of pearls around everybody's neck for favors. And there's the Sho shone Tough and me hungry for J-buckwheat cakes." "With 'lasses," put in the Sho-' shbne Tough, lic...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 27 December 1911

mmmmmmmmmmmm rope teas and dinners to pet edu cated ant eaters you know you fcrould !' Clarence of Keokuk turned aercely upon his accuser. "I jvould not," he said. "I'd spend It every cent for the brotherhood of man. I've some feelin', I kave." "Yes," interjected Hamburg, "along about dinner time." Clarence of Keokuk became tenement. "Everything ought to be divided everything," he de dared, pounding his fist upon a bickoty chip. ".What's yours is mine, Tough. What's mine is yours. That's right, ain't it?" The Tough took a long pull at his smelly pipe. "Oh, it's de right dope, all right," he agreed, "but tain't human nature." "I wish I had a million dollars," declared Clarence of Keokuk. "I'd prove it. I'd give it all away. I'd Great, sizzling cross-ties ! Look at this !" The bunch aroused and peered over the shoulder of the Teader at the scrap of newspaper which he had just turned. They read: "Keokuk, la., July 12. A dili gent effort is being made to dis cover the whereabouts of Cla...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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