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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Facts About Irrigation. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Facts About Irrigation. Our correspondent " F. M. Shaw," San Diego, writes as follows:—"lnsome of the southern counties, irrigation will have to be generally resorted to for almost any crop except the small grains and some of the hardy grasses; and as the water from wells is not always just suited to the particular plant to be irrigated, an exposure for some length of time in open reservoir's might be beneficial, especially where the impurity is not of a saline or alkaline nature. I have noticed a marked difference in the effect of water from the same well, by an exposure of say a week or ten days. The difference is always in favor of the exposed, and against that of freshly pumped water. The reasons for that difference I am not able to give, but I suppose the most effective improving constituents, added by exposure, is oxygen and ammonia." The improvement noticed in water that has been allowed to stand some time in reservoirs is probably due more to its increased temperature than a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Irrigating by Windmills. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Irrigating by Windmills. In our issue of February 11th, wo published a letter from Mr. F. M. Shaw, of San Diego, in which he spoke of a pump and windmill in that locality, costing, with the well, but $400, which raised to a hight of 120 feet, sufficient water to irrigate two acres. We have since received another letter from the same correspondent, called out by queries as to the statement then made, in which he writes:—"The pump referred to is in use upon the grounds of McDonald & Gale, in this place, and is of the Smith & Walmsly pattern, 3inch barrel, double-acting, driven by a 16---foot " Excelsior" mill. But at the depth of 80 feet, I consider it entirely practicable to raise water in large quantities; and with simpler machines. In the first place it has been found that those mills intended to revolve both horizontally and vertically, are twice as expenpensive as one simply revolving one way; or, in other words, placed to only use the prevailing wind. By ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Summer Ranges for Stock. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Summer Ranges for Stock. Under thia caption the Sacramento Union of Tuesday last has a well-timed article, calling the attention of stock raisers in the already parched valleys of this State to the fact that there is an abundance of nutritive grasses growing on the upper bench land of the Sierra range. These elevated pastures are usually in good condition by the first of July, and afford most excellent feed until the Ist or middle of October. This year, however, cattle and sheep may be driven to the very summit of the main range as early as the Ist of June, or sooner. In fact, bunch grass has doubtless already taken the place of snow along the bench land running from Strawberry Valley on the Placerville road to Mount Gregory on the Middle Fork. Early in July, 1866— following a winter much more severe than that last past —we found green bunch grass from four to ten inches in length, covering hundreds of acres so densely that the ground could scarcely be seen, and reaching up nearly t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
From Petaluma to Healdsburg. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

From Petaluma to Healdsburg. J. W. Cartier writes as follows, tinder date of May 7th:—Between Petaluma and Santa Bosa there is much pasture land; but whatever land I saw under cultivation looked very promising. Barley appears to be the principal crop in this county, particularly around Healdsburg where there will doubtless be a large crop. Some of the barley fields are a magnificent Bight. The pasturage is very good. All along the road from Petaluma the hills are clad in green as far as the eye can discern; a greater contrast to the country around San Jose and Los Angeles cannot be imagined. I was much pleased to see several very good orchards and vineyards between here and Petaluma; indeed there are quite a number. I think it rather strange every farmer does not see the importance of early planting a good orchard. The railroad is completed a little beyond Mark West creek; there are about eight miles to build yet between there and Healdsburg. When that is done it will add greatly to...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE VINEYARD. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

THE VINEYARD. In our last article on this subject we had worked our vineyard through the second year's growth. Our efforts vm to this step having been principally directed to securing a good growth of vine in a good form. We are now to commence operations for the Third Year. As a general thing, in this State, the vines begin to bear on tho third year from the cuttings. So that we not only are required to consider the continued growth and form of the vine but also the question of fruit. As the vine should not be allowed to bear but a small crop this year, the pruning should be done early in tho fall; as we have before remarked that vines pruned early in the fall—we mean, of course, after the leaves have dropped and the sap has become still—will make a greater growth of wood the following season than those pruned later in the season. This rule holds good not only with respect to grapes but to all other shrubs and plants. This year should particularly be devoted to forming a good head ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Vintage Prospect. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

The Vintage Prospect. Parties thoroughly conversant with the wine interests of California, says the Bulletin, after receiving ail vices from all the largo grape districts, are of the opinion that the prospect for the vintage is better this season than ever before. Tho number of new vines coming into bearing is very large.and the old ones everywhere arolooking finely, the grapes having already "sot" perfectly, and no damage having been done anywhere by frost or floods. In most localities the danger of damago by frost is entirely passed for the season, and there is no likelihood of injury to any considerable extent being done hereafter to any locality. The danger from frost is considered over by tho 15th May in all parts of the Shite; and this being to some extent an exceptional season, late frosts are not looked for. The dry winter anddessicating winds which have recently been so disastrous to tho growing grain crops, have not effected the vines in the least, ltains within tho next t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE ORCHARD. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

THE ORCHARD.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Management of Orchards. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

The Management of Orchards. A correspondent of the Journal of Horticulture says that almost all apples thrive on dwarf stocks, but he has found that some thus thrive better than others, among which ho names tho early Harvest, American Snmmer Tearmain, Summer Koso, Early Strawberry, Bed Astrachan, Gravenstem, Porter, Summer Rambo, Duchess of Oldenburg, Maiden's Blush, Fall Harvey, Hubbardson's Nonesuch and Fallawator. A very groat error is often made in pruning fruit trees in cutting away to too great an extent the small branches near the center of the tree. It is right that enough should be cut away to let in the sun light and allow of a free circulation of air; but the fruit spurs should always be loft, and, as a general thing, the water shoots or suckers only pruned out. When a tree is properly trimmed and tho orchard not set too close the best fruit is generally grown nearest the center of the tree. Fruit growers in California, where labor is high, and a general disposition manif...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Variety in Fruit Culture. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Variety in Fruit Culture. In order to make fruit growing satisfactorily profitable, pomologists must cultivate varieties thut will ripen in succession, in order to avoid the disadvantage of having on hand at. one time, a supply so largo that the fruit cannot be disposed of as it should be. It is not good policy to cultivate a larger crop than can be handled successfully and secure remunerative prices; and it is especially poor policy to risk all the labor and expense of season upon a singlo kind of fruit. A mixed husbandry is as much safer and more profitable to the poniologist as to the grain grower. Tho strawberry crop may be destroyed by drouth; and yet tho rasberry crop, which follows it, may, by proper management, compensate all loss on the strawberries. Early currants and gooseberries always bring large prices when in good shape. In some markets tho earliest do not bring as large a return as the very latest So careful is thin feature of marketing studied by exporionced cultnri...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Pear Culture. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Pear Culture. The pear which seems to be fast dying out in many localities at tho Kant, is the healthiest of all fruits in California, tho longest livcil, ami the most productive, and tho fruit, as compared with tho pears of other States, is superior in quantity. Somo of the older trees in California yield more than half a ton of fruit each, on an average every year. Tho most profitable pears aro the GloutMorceau, Bartlett, Easter lieurre, Vicar of Wakeneld, and the Winter Nellis. The liartlett is tho most profitable for mountain cultivation, because it ripens after tho valley pears are gone in tho San Francisco market, and then bring from five to ten cents per pound. An experienced pear eulturist says that ho has examined thousands of dwarf pour trees in tho grounds of others, and has never seen good, healthy, vigorous trees where annual pruning has been omitted. Near his orchard which contains 2,000 healthy, thrifty, dwarf pear trees, a neighbor planted trees at tho same time, obt...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURAL NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

AGRICULTURAL NOTES. CALIFORNIA. The Foot HibhH. —Good reports from the crops in the foot hills still continue to reach us, and thero is every reason to believe that the crops there will come fully up to the average of our prosperous years. We append a few extracts from our mountain exchanges :— Large AimivAii of Sheep.—Tho William Taber brought up from tho Southern Coast y 000 sheep, which woro landed direct from tho vessel at Saucelito. Dhouth and the Cattle.—lt is now evident that the rains which may fall after this data will not holp tho grain crops materially, although the pastures would be freshened, and there would be somo augmontation of tho hay crop. A largo number of cattle and shoe;]) have been driven off to tho mountains, and we hoar that a great uumbor aro still moving in tho direction of Nevada. Thoso will be saved, and will augment tho resources of our meat markets. But thousands of cattle will be left to take their chances on tho dry plains, whero oven now thnre is ha...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Labor for the Unemployed and Unfortunate. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Labor for the Unemployed and Unfortunate. Many of the farmers of this State are just now in a most unfortunate and trying situation—we refer to those who are located in regions where the drouth has been most severe. Many are greatly in debt, without the means to pay, and many others, still more unfortunate, have not the means to support their families even through the long period that awaits the planting and incoming of another crop. A large opportunity is here presented on the part of creditors and others to show a spirit of liberality in this season of want and necessity. There are many who have horses and tools and a little means left, and what is better than all, a will to do whatever presents, that will enable them and their families to live until they can again find employment in their own fields. The Alta has made a good suggestion for this last class as follows:— The best chance for employment seems to be in the reclaimed tule land, of which there are probably 100,000 acres ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Artificial Limbs. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Artificial Limbs. Simplicity of construction in all things is at once the greatest beauty and the best recommendation. In nothing is this more applicable than to the substitutes for lost limbs. That this is one of the great objects of the inventions here illustrated, is seen by an examination of the drawings, while it is also evident that utility, comfort and durability are likewise obtained. The engravings represent artificial limbs which have novel features not heretofore obtained in them. India rubber is largely used in their construction, the feet and hands particularly being constructed of this substance. Fig. 1 presents a full-longtii leg standing erect, to bo applied in all oases where amputation oocnrs above the knee joint. Fig. 2 represents a leg to be applied where the leg has been amputated below the knee joint, and the stump is flexible enough and sufficiently long to enable the wearer to use it in walking. It also represents the leg with the heel compressed, and in its ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
California Immigrant Union. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

California Immigrant Union. The reports of the officers of the California Immigrant Union for the year ending April 30th, 1871, have appeared, and show that the society has > been . active in its work. During the past year, 774 letters have been received from the United States, Canada, Europe and Australia, asking for information concerning California. The general agent has received personal applications from 1,2G6 Americans und 466 foreigners'making enquiries relative to securing lands in this State. Documents to the number of nearly forty- thousand havo been distributed throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico, Europe and Australia. These documents were as follows : Pamphlet (English), All About California 15,757 Gorman do.;.'. ...'•■•••••...' 4,016 Hittell'B KiMay, Cal. a Home for the Emigrant.. . 7,903 Resources of California ...' • 4,096 Btat« Surveyor Gen. Report 1,462 U. S. Surveyor Gen. Report W8 Fahair'B Essay, Farming Lands of Cal 789 Scientific Press Supple...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
An Ancient Patent. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

An Ancient Patent. The first patent over granted in England for the preservation of food, reads as follows : " A. D. IG9I, 7, No. 278." " Porter Thomas, and White John.—A grant unto them of the solo use, exerciso, and benefit of their new invencon of keeping and preserving by liquors or otherwise all sorts of flesh, fowle, and flesh, and many other things, either in pieces or in whole bodyes, at a cheaper rate, for many years in all clymates, without changing the nature, quality, tnste, smell, or colour thereof, asgood,palatablo, and wholesome, to be eaten and made use of for any intent and purpose whatsoever, as when first killed or put into such liquor; to hold and enjoy the sumo for 14 years, according to the statue." Can any modern patent beat this ? A Goukmand.—A Mr. Rolgtone died some years sinco in London, who, in ton years,' literally ate up a fortune of one hundred and fifty thousand pounds sterling. This singular person traversed all Europe for the sake of gratifying his a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POPULAR LECTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

POPULAR LECTURES.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Study of Modern Languages. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

The Study of Modern Languages. rprof I'nul Pi°d» before the Mkchanio Abts Ooi,, i eu'k, M»'claunirs' liiHtituto Hull, H. F. Fifth Series. Uoported expressly for the Tbksh.] Lkct. I. May 13. Prof. Pioda, in commencing his lecture, remarked on the varied aspects under which could bo considered. It is the vehicle of thought, allowing of the communication and expression of ideas and facts. But in addition to its connection with the present, it is also connected with the past, with the whole history of tho human race; it is a link joining together every tribe and nation; it shows the relations between the most distant peoples. Tho study of the languages, of their changes and variations, of the similarity and dissimilarity of one with another, has enabled us to discover many new facts in the history of former nations, and has cleared up many obscure points; has opened up many new avenues of knowledge and has, through tho recent works on philology, been raised to the dignity of a science. ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
An Immense Aquarium. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

An Immense Aquarium. A company was lately formed in London, with a capital of $60,000, to make at the northen end of the Crystal Palace (partly burnt down in 1868) an aquarium of large size, which is nearly finshed. It contains all the sucgessive improvements which experience has suggested since 1846. The aquarium is 312 feet long, and 20 feet high, and in width 53 feet in some places, and 35 in others. The public portions of the building consist of three rooms — a saloon, 184x16^ feet; a south room, 30 feet by 8% feet; and a north room, 14 feet by 8% feet. Besides theso, there are a work room, a steam engine and boiler room, an apartment to contain the heating apparatus, two store rooms; an attendants' gallery running from end to end of the entire building, and an office. There are 150,000 gallons of sea water, weighing 700 tons, of which 130,000 gallons are in a reservoir below the saloon, and 20,000 gallons are distributed among GO tanks containing the animals. These tanks are of...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
GOOD HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

GOOD HEALTH.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Climates for Invalids. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 20 May 1871

Climates for Invalids. The great advantage often derived by invalids from a change of climate is so apparent that a large amount of attention and research has been expended by Eastern writers on hygiene, to decide upon the best localities for invalids to resort to. A work upon this subject has recently been published by Wood & Holbrook, of New York, entitled "Climates for Invalids," which is very highly spoken of, both for the instruction it affords to invalids, and also for the general information it contains with regard to the surroundings and climatic conditions of the various localities recommended as a resort for invalids. According to the notices we have read of it, for we have not seen the work itself, it describes quite fully the various advantages possessed by differeat sections of the Atlantic and Missisippi States, and central portions of this continent; but makes no allusion to the Pacific Coast, which probably possesses more advantages in this respect than a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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