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Title: Grenville Standard Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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II. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

n. It was with wonder that Nurse Mu riel and the rest of the staff watched Dr. Cameron fight with death for the sake of the wounded officer. It was as- though by sheer force of person ality he kept him alive, when it seem ed that he was half over the border. Night after night, after a gruelling day, when more wounded had been brought in to the already overcrowd ed hospital, Dr. Cameron hovered by the bedside of the officer. When he should have been taking his scanty rest, he was there. Instead of sleep the iron constitution of the man hed to put up with added watching. And he goc his reward. Slowly, almost as though it was too much of an effort, the sick man turned the corner and came back to earth. When it was settled that he might live, Lady Muriel Deane went to Dr. Cameron and thanked him with her soft eyes glowing. She had forgotten for the moment that daily his attitude towards her had been grimmer and more cold, much to her dismay; now she could only remember that he had manag...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SCARSDALE. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

SCARSDALE. 0 The friends of Mr G. Daniel, son of Cr J. Daniel, of Scarsdale, will be pleased to hear that be now holds the position of Sergeant-Major in the 8th Light Horse Regiment, 3rd Brigade. This regiment has done splendid work at the front, and suffered severe losses. Previous to enlisting, when war was de clared, Sergt-Mjr. Daniel was a school master in South Gippsland. Bugler E. Youden, who was formerly corporal bugler of the 7th Regiment, Bal larat, and was afterwards in the 70th Regiment, in writing to his father, Const. 0. Yonden, of Scarsdale. makes refer ence to several soldiers of that district. He says . " I am glad to say I received your parcel of socks, shirts, pipe, and to bacco, &c., and it was very acceptable, I can tell you. I-was also glad to receive your letters, to know yon were well. I have not seen Fred Wrigley or George Daniel for two months. I met Norman Carnegie four days ago ; he is well, and wishes to be remembered to you. Dig gers Stokoe and D...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Call to the Colors! RECRUITS WANTED. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

RECRUITS' WANTED. •Victoria-requires an average of 80 re cruits daily to reinforce. Victorians at the front. Minimum height... 5 feet 2 inches Age ,f. , ... 18 to 45 years Cljest measurement (Jnlly expanded) , ;.. 33 inches Persons desiring to enlist should, if in the metropolitan area, apply at. the recruiting depot at military headquart ers, and if in other localities at the near est town hall, shire hall, drill hall, or re cruiting depot, where arrangements will be made formedieal examination. Free railway tickets to the metropolis will be granted aft^r medical examina tion. Rates of} Pay per Day. After Embarkation ... Before (.including Embarkation. deferred pay); Lieutenant .... 18^ Bd 21s Sergeant ./.'3 0s 10s 6d Corporal .... 9s 10s Private ... 5s; 6s Separation Allowance.' Separation allowance will be paid to married men who are receiving less than 8s per day, but such-allowance will not exceed the amount necessary to make up the difference between their daily rate of pay an...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FIGHTING FOR HIS GLASSES. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

FIGHTING FOR HIS GLASSES. A pair of field-glasses "made in Germany" was responsible for the loss of a trench by the Germans in circumstances at once laughable and inspiring. The story was told at University College by Professor J. H. Morgan. The hero of it was a young British subaltern who "won the V-C. The subaltern had a pair of Zeiss field-glasses of which he was extra ordinarily proud. He bored everyone stiff "by talking about them continu ally. One day his company had "been compelled to fail back on their sup port trenches owing to a sudden Ger- j man attack. All at once the subaltern shouted "Good heavens!" and bolted through I the communication trench. A sergeant, -who was very fond of •the young officer, went after him, and came back shortly after to the commanding officer to report: — "Sir, he has recaptured the trench." IThe commanding officer collected his men, and again advanced to the fire trench, where he found the sub altern, with a revolver in each hand, in front of ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MARVELS OF SURGERY. WHAT OUR DOCTORS ARE DOING. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

MARVELS OF SURGERY. WHAT OUR DOCTORS ARE DOING. The most astounding thing about modern science is the fact that as fast as it invents new and ingenious methods of destruction it provides new and equally ingenious means of restoration. It restores no less quick ly than it destroys. The present war has furnished at once a test and a triumph for the science of healing, writes a "Daily Chronicle" representa tive. Within a few hours of receiving their wounds on the field of battle the soldiers of to-day are Deing cared for, and in many cases cured, in the most elaborately equipped English hospitals. In its physical sense the process of restoration has become hardly less mechanical—and happily hardly less certain—than the process of destruc tion. "If you want to see miracles," said the chief medical officer of a large London hospital recently, "I can show you some here—miracles of mod ern surgery." And he was as good as ! his word. Hobbling along one of the J wide corridors of the hospita...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IV. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

IV. Dr. Cameron went out of the big, bare hospital building. The thunder of guns had died away. In fact, the last few days had been comparatively peaceful, for tha zone of fighting had somewhat shifted. He was thinking hard. He thought of Muriel now, and his tired face tensed. How he loved her, yet how he had detested the idea oi ner coming at first? When he had neard that Lady Muriel Deane was to be a nurse under him he had kick ed hard. "She'll wear rattling bangles," he had said, angrily. "She'll drop hair pins all over, and shriek when she sees blood, and faint when the first wounded man is brought in." Someone was coming towards him. Un .er the faint morning light he saw it was Lady Muriel with something that was white and cloudy around her head. His haart beat quickly, but he kept himself in hand with an iron will. Under the meagre light he saw her face. It was softly flushed, and her eyes were as dark as the sky and as radiant as sun-kissea pansies. Strong man a he was, he fe...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MY BROTHER WOT STAYED AT HOME. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

MY BROTHER WOT STAYED AT HOME. I've picked up me old Lee-Enfield, An' I've buckled me web about, For I'm only a bloomin' private, An' 'ave got ter see it out. An' thougli 'e shames 'is manhood, An' stains 'is pedigree, Thank God there's some of us old 'uns left, An' we'll fight until we're free. But should ther foe o'erpower us, An' we gits overthrown, Then 'e'll know 'e 'elped ter kill me Me brother wot stayjed at 'ome. T. Skeyhill, in "Poems from the Peninsula"

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
JEWISH SOLDIERS. Some of the Many in Various Armies Tell of Adventures. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

JEWISli SOLDIERS. Some of the Many in Various Armies Tell of Adventures. In the huge German and Austrian armies Jews are well represented both among officers and soldiers. A col lection of letters written by German and Austrian Jews at the front, which has just appeared at Berlin, paints the liie of these men in thrilling- and vivid fashion. The letter writers tell rela tives and friends at home of tragic moments of battle, of amusing experi ences during hours of relaxation, of religious services held while shells screamed through the air, 01 cheery evenings spent with co-religionists in France or Poland who forgot for the time being that their guests were in vaders of their native soil. Through out the hook there are countless lit tle touches, bits of reflective phrase, that bring clearly before the reader how w?r reacts on the minds of those waging it. One of the most interesting letters of ail is from Private Werner of the 104th Infantry, deserving the death of his brother Walter...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Ad. Cree Entertainers. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

As will be seen from onr advertising column, Linton is to be favored with a visit of the above talented Company on Monday, 25th inst,.and judgingfrom re ports patrons are assured of a first-cluss entertainment. It is a number of years since Ad Cree last appeared in Linton, but he left a lasting impression behind him as a comedian who can be excruciat ingly funny without the introduction oE the slightest trace of vulgarity or inuen do. On this occasion Mr Cree will pre sent an entirely new programme of songs and sketches, including his latest suc cess, "I'm a Hundred Years Old." This sketch of the centenarian is con sidered the finest characterisation Mr Cree has ever staged. The supporting artists include Miss Dolly Stewart iu 44 Monologues," Mr R. A. Bartleman, the popular baritone ; Mr Jack M'Ken zie, champion dancer and piper ; Miss Jennie Cree, who will be heard in several Scottish songs, duets, and comedy sketches. Altogether the entertainment promises to be of a bright and bre...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OLD MIRROR SUPERSTITIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

OLD MIRROR SUPERSTITIONS. The mistrust of the ghostly mirror is so old and so far spread that we meet with it in the folklore of every land." An old tradition warns us that the new moon, which brings us such good fortune when we look at it in the calm evening sky, carries a mes sage of evil to those who see it first reflected in a looking-glass. For such unlucky mortals it is said that the lunar virus distils slow poison and corroding .care. And, again, it is declared that the friends who glance at their reflec tions standing side by side are doom ed to quick dissension. In Scandin avia the Swedish girl who looks into her glass by candle-light is told that she risks the loss of her lover. One superstition in this connection that seems to be almost universal is that it is very unlucky for a bride to see herself in a mirror after her toilet is completed. If she be discreet, she will turn away from that fair picture which pleases her so well, and then draw on her glove, or have some ti...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE DAWN. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

THE DAWN. "Nurse Muriel, Major Lawrence Bel 1 ham is calling for you." The doctor spoke coldly, but then he never did expand much, and Nurse Muriel was quite used now to his curt manner, though at first she had been made quite unhappy by it. "Thank you, doctor," she answered, quietly; "I will' go to him. Is he very bad?" She spoke wistfully, and the hag gard-faced doctor frowned. "He cannot live, poor thing," he said, with a touch of pity in his usual ly sharp voice that made her realise that the case, was a hopeless one. She was getting used to men com ing in to hospital battered and woun- I ded, but she could never get used to the brave, patient way they suffered, each with one great ambition, to get well and have "another shot at the beggars!" Now she hurried away; the doctor gazed at her, hesitated a moment, and then followed her up the long ward between the small iron beds to where the wounded major lay. j "Muriel!" Nurse Muriel, on hearing her name, hurried to the bedside of t...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
INVENTORS AND THE PIANO. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

INVENTORS AND THE PIANO. When we realise the multitude of inventors who have tried their hand at devising mechanism for the piano, it is surprising to note that, although it has undergone many alterations, the check action invented by Erard nearly a hundred years ago is still in use to-day in all its essential fea tures. Most inventors in this line have directed their attention to im provement in the hammer and dem per mechanism; hut it is reported that recently an improvement has been made in the key mechanism that is quite revolutionary. The or dinary key works on the fulcrum prin ciple, and it is necessary to counter weight each key with lead, and.al though the keys work easily, there is a very considerable weight of mater ial, to be put into motion. The new plan is to delicately balance each key on a rocker, thus producing the "cradle"' keyboard. This plan en ables the key to respond more readily to the touch, and repeats more rapid ly, and as the damper is operated quicker, rap...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WAR ITEMS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

WAR ITEMS. Turkish baths are unknown in Tur key. Every Italian who is fit is liable to 19 years' service—from his twen tieth birthday. Holland,, with an area one-fourth the size of the State of New York, ranks third amongst the countries of the world in the number of its colonial1 residents, and sixth in the area of its ! colonies. j Lady Paget, a British Red Cross nurse, who went to Serbia, has been 1 honored by having a street called after he:\ The finest street in Uskub has ' been called "Lady Paget Street." I William Pitt, the Prime Minister in England of over 100 years ago, once said: "England has saved herself by aer courage—she will save Europe by her example." In the present war, dogs are accom plishing many remarkable feats with an intelligence and sagacity little short of wonderful. They are being intensively used in the moving of j guns of the lighter kind, for scout and 1 sentry duty, and for seeking out the wounded. A novel advertisement is now being painted on the safe...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
An Expert. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

' An Expert. Quite recently a man appeared at the recruiting-offices in Newcastle and stated to the officer in charge that he wished to enlist into His Ma jesty's Army. "Well, my man, what regiment do you prefer to join?" asked the officer. "Well," replied the recruit, "I should like to join the cavalry." "Cavalry," repeated the liead of the ! recruiting department. "All right, my man, do you know anything about | horses?" I "Do I know anything about i horses?" replied the would-be recruit, seriously. "Why, I backed a winner ; and two seconds yesterday!" A tourist had reached the only inn i in a lonely Highland glen. As he g:azed around at the grim, en circling mountains, and thought how far away the world seemed, a sudden thought struck him. "But don't you find it very lonely here? For instance, when you are ill, you will never be able to have a doctor." "Nae, sir," replied the native; "there's nane o' them roond here. We hae jist tae dee a naitural death." \ Sunday-School Teacher:...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TRAINING HORSES FOR WAR. France Has 200,000 War Horses. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

TRAINING HORSES FOR WAR. France Has 200,000 War Horses It is hard to realise what an im portant part horses play in war, for we are so accustomed to motors in every way that we think the war horse is like the cab-horse—almost extinct. The war-footing of horses is just over 200,000 for Germany, the same number for France, 100,000 for Aus tria and Great Britain, and over 600,000 for Russia. A horse, like a man, has to he spe cially trained. It is the cavalryman's other self, as it were, and unless both are thoroughly trained then the whole cannot work properly together. The_ training of man and horse is seen at its best at the great French Cavalry School at Saumur. Here come all the smart French lieuten ants to learn horse-riding, veterinary work, and at least something about horse-shoeing and saddle-making. There is an immense practice ground there, and there can be seen dragoons and horses galloping, leap ing hurdles and cavalrymen mounting and dismounting their horses at full speed...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Cycling & Motoring. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

| Cycling & Motoring. To-day the average Australian motor ist is fully aware of the real importance of supporting home industries. In the past a considerable number of foreign made tyres have found a market in this country, resulting in large sums of money going oversea. - In twelve months previ ous to the war over £850,000 of manu factured rubber goods, mostly motor tyres, were imported into the Common wealth. There was really no sound reason why these imports should have been so high, for the Australian made " Dunlop " has no superior in the world, either for quality or service. In this di rection Australia is well able to be self supporting, thereby keeping thsouands of Australian workmen employed. One lesson the war has taught is that Aus tralians must make this country as self contained as possible. Indnstries must be built up and supported in lieti of im porting goods. Motorists can materially help by using Australian made tyres. In this connection it is interesting to...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Grenvilleshire Estimates. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 23 October 1915

The following estimates for the en siling year were framed at the last meet ing of the Grenville Shire Council :— EAST RIDING. Holly bush-Werneth road ... £200 Pitfield-Ballarat road ... 75 Illabarook road 30 Berringa-Derwent Jacks road 40 Staffordshire Reef road 50 Ryan's and Broderick's road 40 Day labor 251' Happy Valley and Piggoreet 20 Gordon's Bridge 60 £766 WEST RIDING. Linton-Wallinduc road £250 Wallinduc-Berrybank road... 250 Werneth and district 50 Linton-Carngham road 10 Linton-Mortchup road 20 O'Meara's-Snake Valley ... 20 Linton township 20 Culvdrts and bridges... 70 Shire Hall ... 27 Reservoirs ... 20 Day labor ... ... 77 \ Spring Hill road ' ...' 20 Mt. Bute road ]0 Main Roads Board ... ... 23 £867 NORTH RIDING. Smythes road £100 Cherrytree road 100 Haddon road, No. 2 boundary 40 Medwell's road ... 40 Ross' Creek road 40 Wittshire Lane 20 Mitchell's Lane 36 Davies road, Ross' Creek ... 20 Bull Inn-Sago Hill 20 Surface labor 173 £589

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Treat For Him. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 October 1915

A Treat For Him. James, my laa, saia me grocer to his new assistant, "who bought that mouldy cheese to-day?" "Mrs. Brown, sir," was the youth's reply. "And the stale loaf we could not sell last night?" "Mrs. Brown, sir." "Where's that lump of rancid but ter that the baker refused?" "Mrs. Brown bought it cheap, sir," was the answer. "And the six eggs we could not sell a week since?" "Mrs. Brown." "Are you ill, sir?" asked James, as the grocer turned green and groan ed. "No, no; only I'm going to tea at Brown's to-night," replied the un happy man as he wiped the perspira tion from his face and sank into a chair.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Not To Be Sung Idly. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 October 1915

Not To Be Sung Idly. Mr. wm irwin tells now sacred "The Marseillaise" has become to the French people: — I was talking with a Frenchwoman, one of those gentle, efficient daugh ters of France who have sent all that they most love to the line, and who are doing man's work at home. I have forgotten how it came up; but I happened to. hum a bar of the "Mar seillaise." She put out a restraining hand; I saw that somehow I had hurt her. "It is the most wonderful song," she said. "It is France—it is France!" I looked at her; the tears were in her eyes. The song, so perfectly ex pressive of France, has struck into the depths of French emotion. It must not oe rendered carelessly. It must be rendered as a rite of patriot ism, with all accompaniments of beauty—like Mass.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BOOKS ON THE BATTLEFIELD. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 October 1915

BOOKS ON THE BATTLEFIELD. "An army in which every soldier read his Bible and every officer read his Field Service Pocket-Book daily, would be the finest army ever seen," said Sir John French, on one occa sion', and although our brave lads do not confine themselves entirely- to these two books, it is a significant fact that in the British Army almost every officer's kit contains the Field Service Pocket-Book—a potted re sume of military text-books issued by the War Office—and the Bible is easily first favorite as a book for the battlefield. It has been noticed, too, that '"Tommy" prefers solid reading ra ther than the lighter kind. A com mittee of ladies who organised the supply of literature to our soldiers have recorded that requests for "tra vels and history, and requests for some books of a more solid charac ter," are being constantly made. A respectable artisan asked for "Dante," adding thai he had "never had time to read Dante before." Marcus Aurelius is a favorite with a great...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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