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Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 10,319 items from Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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ANNEXING HEAVEN. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

ANNEXING HEAVEN. Lieutenant-Colonel Seton Churchill, presidiug at a recent meeting, told of a Kaffir who, seeing a drumhead service during the first Boer war, asked out officers what it meant. , ' They are worshipping God,' he was I told. ' and jvant to go to heaven where Ho lives.' ' Heaven very nice place?' asked the Kaffir. ' Yes,' was the reply. , 'The why,' asked the Kaffir, 'you English not annex heaven f' ! Never be idle, but keep! your handt or mind usefully employed, excepf when sleeping. \ \ ?

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KILLED BY DELUSION. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

KILLED BY DELUSION. Great is the power of imagination. The following story of this power over the human body is well authenticated : A poor watchmaker who lived in an obscure quarter was the prey of a sin gular delusion. He imagined that his soul had passed from his body into a peculiar watch he had worked on for twenty years. . ' On the day my watch stops,' he was wont to say, 'I shall die. My life has become subordinate to i hat watch.' One day the watch began to run irre gularly — at first too fast, then too slow. ?' I am very ill,' said the old man, and he took to his bed. Two days later the watch stopped. The excited man. noticed the unmov ing hand, rose to a sitting posture, ut i ered a cry, and fell baok dead.

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Bright Side. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

s*i The Bright Side. After the Ways and Means Com mittee had been compelled to leave its old quarters and go over to a new House of Representatives office build ing some of his friends were sympath ising with Champ Clark. 'It might have been worse, Champ,' they said. 'Cheer up. Pretty soon they will have the electric cars run ning in the subway and then you can ride over.' 'Yes,' replied Clark. 'It might have been worse. Reminds me of an Irishman I knew down in St. Louis who had both his legs cut off by a railroad train. 'It might have been worse, Mike,' they said. ''Sure,' Mike replied; 'suppose I had been a chorus girl.' '

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Practice and Precept. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

Practice and Precept. John Jones, Solicitor,' was the legend on the big brass plate outside the office door. John Jones had pass ed through college and had returned t to his native village to practice. Enter upon the scene the oldest in habitant, who always interfered everywhere, and made himself a gen eral nuisance. The noise of the door opening caus ed Mr. Jones to look up. There stood old 'Uncle John.' 'Humph!' exclaimed the latter. 'So you re a lawyer, are you? 'Yes,' replied the young man proudly. 'And what do you. know about law?' — — — - was the old gentleman's next ques tion. Now, look here, Uncle John, you just be civil, or I'll put you out of here!' — the young lawyer's voice spoke of his rising anger. 'You can't put .me out!' Quickly the young fellow swung round in his new swivel-chair and seized one of the brand-new books Denmd mm. Quickly turning over tne pages he. found what he sought. 'If, after due' notice has been serv ed upon trespasser, he still refuses to leave, ...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HIS FIRST LOVE. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

HIS FIRST LOVE. A little boy to love inclined, A little maid one day did find, Walking alone, he kept behind Like This. Then to a seat at last came she, . And, being tired, sat down, you see, Right at the end, the other, he, Like This. At last he smiled, and she smiled, too, And soon the distance shorter grew Between them, as when lovers woo, Likethis. But pa was passing by, and he Dragged Tommy home, and soon wer see That little boy on pater's knee ?siin enn

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Most Acceptable. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

Most Acceptable. Dry den, the author, who was notor iously poor, was one evening in com pany with the Duke of Buckingham, Lord Dorset, and some other noble men of wit and genius. It happened that the conversation, which was lit erary, turned on the art of composi tion, and elegance of style; and after some debate it was agreed that each party should write something on whatever subject seemed to strike his imagination, and place it under the candlestick for Mr. Dry den's judg ment. Most of the company took uncom mon pains to out-do each other, while Lord Dorset, with much composure, wrote two or three lines, and care lessly threw them to the place; agreed on. The rest having finished, the arbitrator opened the leaves of -tlieir destiny. In going through the whole, he displayed strong marks of pleasure and satisfaction; but at one in particular he seemed in raptures. 'I must acknowledge,' said Dryden, 'that there are abundance of fine things in my hands, and sucli as do honor lo the p...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CARE FOR YOUR BOY. Chats With the Ambitious—And Others. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

CARE FOR YOUR BOY. Chats With the Ambitious — And Others. - By Orison Swett Harden. . I One of the bitterest things in many a business man's life has been the dis covery, after he has made his money, that he has lost his hold upon his boy, and he would give a large part of his fortune to recover his loss. I have been in homes where the re lation between father and sons was so strained and formal that the latter would no more think of making a con fidant of their lather than they would of a stranger. They have been so re buffed, snubbed and scolded, so un kindly treated,' that they would never think of going to him for advice or suggestions regarding any confidential matters. Any business man would be horri fied at the suggestion that he would ruin his boy by neglect, that his ab sorption in business would result in the undoing of his own son. But it is the easiest thing in the world to for feit a boy's confidence. It will take only a little snubbing, a little scolding, a little indi...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE USUAL WAY. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

THE USUAL WAY. There was once a little man, and his rod and line he took, j For he said, 'I'll go a-fishing in the j neighbouring brook.' ! And it chanced a little maiden was 1 walking out that day, And they met- — in the usual way. Then he sat down beside her, and an hour or two went by. But still upon the grassy bank his rod ana line did lie. 'I thought,' she shylv whispered, you d be be fiishing all the day !' And he was — in the usual way. So he gravely took his rod in hand, and threw the line about, But the £sh perceived distinctly he was ' looking out; A ill1 he i-aiij. ''Sweetheart. I love you!' , but- sVie said she could not stay, Bui she did — in the usual way. Then the stars came out above them, ? I and she gave a little, sigh, ' ; As they watched the silver ripples like I . the roomei ts running by ; ? ' We must say good-bye ' she whisper ed, by the alders old and grey, And they did — in the usual way. And day by day, beside the stream, they wandered to and fro, Ajnd day ...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW COLIC IS CAUSED. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

HOW COLIC IS CAUSED. One of the most fruitful causes of I colic is the too common habit of allow- I ing horses to partake of large draughts I of water .immediately after finishing a | feed of oats. There is no surer way of generating an attack of colic than this, the reason being that when a large quantity of water is thus imbibed it has the effect of carrying with it out of the stomach and into th^ intestines some of the freshly eaten grain. This grain being still in a raw and undigested con dition, its effect when it reaches the intestines is to give rise to the irrita tion and inflammation wnicn are tne immediate causes of the colic. In deal ing with cases of this kind the most obvious course to adopt is to take pre cautions to prevent the animals from drinking large quantities of water under the circumstances just referred to. When an animal falls a victim to an attack of colic, the best thing to do is to administer a dose consisting of one ounce of laudanum and two ounc-cs of s...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DAIRYING. COWS BEFORE AND AFTER CALVING. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

DAIRYING. COWS BEFORE AND AFTER CALVING. The most critical time with the dairy cow is the three weeks previous to and following her calving. In the former she is fitted for the trying ordeal of maternity, and in the latter -ihe is brought to her best pro duction , thereby laying the foundation for her year's work as a profitable dairy animal. The writer believes, in the profit f.lipra is in havmiz a dairv cow dry for at least thirty days prior to calving. A large flow oi milk in the year imme diately following is assured thereby, as well as a stronger and healthier calf. If the cow is milked from calving to calving, while this practice lessens the chance of milk fever, it is done at the expense of production and of the health of the calf, for the food which should go to nurture the mother and her yet uuborn calf is used in the elaboration of milk. Assuming that the cow' has been dried off, and that she is a deep milker, the fear of milk ferer is ever preseat in the mind of the owner...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DAYSEY MAYME AND HER FOLKS A Strange Light in the Heavens. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

DAYSEY MAYME AND HER FOLKS A Strange Light in the Heavens. By Francis L. Garside. It is quite the fashion to abuse the men. A fashion that has lasted long er than hobble skirts, and that will prevail long after the new pannier overskirts are forgotten. Women meet at afternoon teas and abuse the men, who are downtown earning a living. Later in the even ing they gather in halls and abuse the. men, leaving the babies at home with the men while they do it. A favorite failing for abuse is the charge made against the mien that thev carouse around at night. Mrs. Lysander John Appleton makes this particular masculine weakness her hobby, giving the impression that Ly sander John is at that vtery moment frivolling up and down beneath the electric lights. That he knows seventeen different ways for playing soltaire is never made public at these meetings. The man who knows seventeen different ways of playing soltaire is either con fined in jail or a model husband. Ly sander John is not confined ...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE LIGHTHOUSE KEEPER. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

THE LIGHTHOUSE KEEPER. Every third month a broadshould jred, squarely built man promenaded along (he quays of the little fishing village on the island of Pelworm. He ?as dressed in a black Prince Albert v.-oat, white vest and stovepipe hat when he walked along- the quays, but when he disappeared he took up his vocation of attending, the lighthouse on Bishop's Rock. Why he had entered this branch of the Govenrment service I have never been able to find out. Now, at the iige of forty-nine years, he was filled with a horror of the sea, and the. Prince Albert coat he wore during his week off, he put on as a protest against his work. Nothing gave him more pleasure than to be taken for a drummer. 'The sea is as smooth as a polished floor,' he said to me one day when we were sitting together on the shore looking westward to where the light house was dimly visible against the sky. 'but the sea is treacherous. 'Around Bishop's Rock there are undertows, currents and eddies which nobody knows....

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AGRICULTURE. MAKING BUSH HAY. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

AGRICULTURE. ?- - ? ? w - ? MAKING BUSH HA*. In seasons of plenty the pastorahsi may, with advantage, save some of tlu best of his surplus grasses in the form of bush hay, or ensilage, and if graziers and dairymen considered this matter more fully thev would find themselves in a better position to meet Use ravages of the ^drought and severity of the winter months. One has only to take a trip through the dairying districts to see what state of affairs exists amongst most of the dairymen. Cows have died in lat-DTA nnmhfirs simnlv tlirnuorh star vation. and the farmers are a great deal to blame themselves., for not providing artificial fodder in the shape of either bush hay or ensilage. The simple rea son is that too much is being paid for lpnd, hence the farmer has to stock the land to the very utmost of its carry ing capacity during sprine when it is. at its he6t, to enable him to make both ends meet, and cutting a few acres of meadow hay, o. cultivating, say halfa dozen acres, is qu...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
He'd Got It. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

He'd Got It. 'My son,' said the successful city merchant, whose scion had recently started in a shipping office, 'You can't get on in this world without push. Luck is all very well in its way, and may give a man a helping hand now and again, but it's as unreliable as — ha! ha! — the Australian climate, my boy. Take it from me, all the most successful men got on by push.' 'But, father ? ' 'No buts, Percy. Just bear my les son in mind — it's push that does it.' 'I know, father,' said the son gloom ily, 'I got it this morning.' 'Pray, tell me why the price of bread Has mounted up so high?' 'It is because,' the baker said, 'The wheat is dear to buy.' 'Then tell me why does wheat abide So high?' I asked the seer. 'Oh, that's gone upward,' he replied, 'Because the bread is dear!' There is no fool like the peace maker who interferes between hus band and wife. As an illustration of great devotion to truth, a would-be M.P. told his au ditors that he 'underwent a severe thrashing when a boy f...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
INCREASED VALUE OF SHEEP. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

INCREASED VALUE OF SHEEP. Some figures furnished by Mr. Alban Gee, manager of the.Sydney Meat Pre serving Company Limited, illustrate the improved condition of the stock and country during the past 12 months. In August last, when the sheep coming to market became fit' for export as fro zen mutton, the company decided to en gage in the export trade, and from August 31 of this year to November 33 last, 60,000 sheep (woolly and shorn) were purchased at an average price of 19s. 9Ad. per head : the weight of the sheep averaged 52.421b., and the total : cost was £59,312 10s. For the corres Doildinir neriod last, rear tli» nnmnanv purchased 42,803 sheep (shorn) at an average price of 6s. 9d., weighing 30,64 lb., and totalling £14,438 lC.s. '.Id. : while 1 for the same period in 190] upwards cf 112,076 sheep (woolly and shorn) were purchased at an average of 12s. Id. per head, the average weight being 43.241b., at a. total cost of £67,743 3s. Id. The sheep this season were mainly aethers, w...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW TO PRESERVE THE SURPLUS FEED. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

HOW TO PRESERVE THE SURPLUS FEED. A large subject has been opened up by the question as to how to preserve surplus feed in good years, and silos naturally take an important position in this connection. Excellent ensilage can be made from most native grasses or herbage; anything succulent which stock will eat in the green state will make good ensilage. Trefoil makes very good ensilage, whilst even the thistle lias been used with good success, and although the latter, when it has been in silo stock for any time, has rather an uninviting appearance, yet it has boen found that stock eat it rreely. Ensilage can also he made by an addi tion of any of the above in such proportions as may be convenient, but, on the other hand, if we intend growing crops for this purpose, the most suit able will depend greatly upon the soil and climate of the district in which we are situated. Ensilage can be made from wheat, barley, oats, maize, sorg hum, rye. lucerne, and many other kinds, hence one has a ...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Family Notices [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 23 August 1912

DEATH Ducret.— On the 21st August, at Strat- ford, Christina Margaret, dearly be- loved wife of Alfred Ducret, Aged 38 years. FUNERAL NOTICE, The friends. of Mr A. Ducret are re- spectfully invited to follow the remains of his late beloved wife to the place of interment, the Nuntin Cemetery. The Funeral Cortege will leave Mr Ducret' s residence at 2 p.m. on Friday,   23rd August (to-day) for the Church of England, where a short service will be held, the cortege leaving the Church about 3 p.m. T. L. POOLE, Undertaker.

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 30 August 1912

mL ( Th6 Supreme Courts the people, bare decided that Dr.Sheldon's New Discovery wins against Coughs and Colds. /Price, Is. 6d.^ and 3s. Obtainable from M. M' Ilroy Sjiratford and Briagolong.

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 30 August 1912

For Chronic Chest Complaints, Woods' Great Peppermint Cure, Is 5d ' I THOUGHT HE WOULD BREAK A BLOOD VESSEL.' ' My little boy had a croupy cough foe some time,' writes Mrs. E. E. Bul!% Beaumont-street, Hamilton, Newcastle, N.S.W. ' He would cough so long thac I thought he would break a blood vessel. I was really frightened for him, because he is not strong, and continual coughing made his chest quite sore. After trying many remedies without any improvement, I gave him Dr. Sheldon's New Discovery* The firat dose stopped the coughing, and in a week's time he was cured.' Ob tainable from M, Mcllroy, Stratford and Briagolong, The Supreme Court, the people, have decided that Dr. Sheldon's New Discovery wins againnt Coughs and Colds.. Price. Is. 6d. and 3s. Obtainable from M. H* Ilroy Stratford and Briagolong.

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CLYDEBANK. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 30 August 1912

CLYDEBANK. A concert and dance was held in th» Clydebank Hall on Tuesday, 20th. inat. The members of the Tennis Club, who got up the entertainment are gratified to know that its object, to pay off . the debt remaining on the Hall piano, has been obtained. CrR, J. Thomson was chairman for the ? .? ? Tl ? j. ? ? 1 1 evttuuig. . i- i'ts uuuuwd was opened oy Mr A, Jorgensen playing an overture, and songs were rendered by Messrs Crowe, Greaves, Hickman, and L. , Jorgensen, who kindly came from Stratford to assist. Mr T. Oullinan, who has made himself a favorite here, as everywhere, gave two songs in his happiest manner, and was encored, as were most of the other singers for their enjoyable numbers. Mr Adlard a local singer, was enthusiBsticly . received, one of his encore ditties being obviously well-known to his audience. Accompaniments were played by Mrs G. Glover, Miss Wain, and Mr A, Jorgensen. During aa interval Mr Robb presented Mr Jack Hopkins with a set of handsome carver and sil...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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