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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

The Indian Advocate. ' 165 with the rights of self-government. This brought about the treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, which resulted in their sell ing their lands east of the Mississippi and purchasing the tract now occupied by them and the Chickasaws. It was agreed that the proceeds of the sale was to be placed in the treasury and paid within a certain time with interest at 5 per cent up to date of payment. But the payment was deferred for half a century; the interest, which would have swelled the original sum to many millions, was only allowed for two years, and the principal cut down so that the entire sum only amounted to about $1,641,896 when divided. The treaty was followed by a universal preparation for the new land, many of the very old as well as the very young sharing in the toilsome journey. We shall not dwell upon the hardships undergone by these patient people, not a few of whom perished in their pilgrimage. The greater number sojourned in Eagle, Tow sen, Bok-tuk-kalo a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

i66 The Indian Advocate. The Choctaw Nation covers an area of 10,450 square miles and an acreage of 6,688,000. It is therefore the largest of the Five Nations. Of this great tract of land scarcely one-third is fitted for agricultural purposes, especially in the eastern counties, where the surface is broken by mountain chains whose long and rather narrow valleys are not always the most fertile. The prairie land of Blue County is excep tionally good, while the bottom lands of the South Canadian are highly productive, yielding enormous crops of corn, cot ton, etc. Rich tracts of land are also to be found here and there adjacent to the waters of Red River, Blue and the various branches of Boggy Creek. The country throughout is splendidly watered and well adapted to stock raising. But the chief wealth of the Choctaw Nation is and will henceforth be dependent upon the apparently inexhaustible coal beds, which are now being developed with great rapidity. The in come accruing to the citizen...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

s v The Indian Advocate. 167 Southwest, this side of the Sierra Madre Mountains. Its diversity of landscape is remarkable, exhibiting a rare pano rama within the limits of a day's travel. East of the Kia mitia range the country is very sparsely settled, and but few h ibitations are to be met with in the Sans Bois, Sugar Loaf and Pushma-lin mountains. In these regions bear, panther, mountain lion and other wild animals are to be met with, while deer, turkey and smaller game are plentiful. Regarding the Indian people, it is worthy of observation that the full-bloods never erect their dwellings beside a public highway, nor within proximity to each other, but rather seek an isolated spot at the foot of some hill and close to water. Here they cultivate a small patch of corn and raise their hogs, upon which food they chiefly subsist. We refer only to the small minority or unenlightened portion of the population, for the vast majority of the Choctaws are equal in point of intelligence more...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

1 68 The Indian Advocate. ! t History of the Kiowas, From the Report of the Bureau of Ethnology. t 11 . Continued from the May Number. HE leading facts in the traditional history of the T Kiowa are those of their early residence at the extreme neaa 01 tne Missouri ana rneir suDse quent removal to the east and alliance with the Crows. It is impossible to assign any definite date to this early migration from the mountain country, but it was probably about or before 1700. It was subsequent to the separation of the Crows from the Hidatsa, an event which proba bly took place before the end of the seventeenth century, and it must have been long before the discovery of the Black Hills by the Dakota,, which, according to a calen dar of that people, occurred in 1775. The present tai-me or sun-dance "medicine" of the Kiowa was obtained from the Crows while the two tribes were neighbors in the north, at a date probably very near 1765. It is probable that scarcity of game or severity of climate...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

The Indian Advocate. 169 that tribe lived about the three forks of the Missouri, near where are now Gallatin and Virginia City, Montana. This information, obtained from old men without the use of lead ing questions, and with the aid of good maps, tallies exactly with the earliest tradition of the Kiowa tribe. They say fur ther that the Kiowa moved down from the mountains and eastward along the Yellowstone in company with the Crows, and then turned southeastward to about the present neigh borhood of Fort Robinson, Nebraska, where they parted with the Crows and continued southward. "Plenty-poles," then nearly ninety years of age, first met the Kiowas when he was a small boy on the head of the North Platte, west of the present town of Cheyenne, Wyoming. The friendship between the Kiowa and the Crows was close and intimate, in spite of occasional quarrels, and con tinued after the Kiowa had entirely removed from the north and established themselves on the Arkansas. They made common caus...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

170 The Indian Advocati:. calling themselves Nadiisha Dcna. They are not a detached band of the Apache tribe proper of Arizona, as has commonly been supposed, but came down with the Kiowa from the north, and neither tribe has any tradition of a time when they were not associated. This ancient Athapascan alliance is another link in the chain connecting the Kiowa with the far north. We come now to more definite historic ground. Situated east of the Crows, the Kiowas took possession of the Black Hills, and having by this time procured some horses, began to make raids on the Spanish frontiers to the south, while they established a friendly trade and intercourse with the Arikara and Mandan on the Missouri. They are mentioned under the name of Cargua (for Caigua) in a Spanish docu ment of 1732, and again as Caigua in 1735. In 1748 the Spanish historian Villasenor mentions the "Cayguas," in con nection with Comanche, Apache, Navaho and Ute, as among the hostile tribes of New Mexico. It wil...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

The Indian Advocate. 171 and had driven them out from that region. This is admitted by the Kiowa, who continued at war with the Dakota and Cheyenne until about 1840, when a permanent peace was made. It does not appear that the Arapaho had anything to do with this expulsion of the Kiowa, with whom they seem generally to have been on friendly terms, although at a later period we find them at war with the Kiowa, being probably drawn into hostilities through their connection with the Chey enne. As is welt known to ethnologists, the Dakota are com paratively recent immigrants from east of the Missouri. They first reached the Black Hills in 1775, as already stated, so that the final expulsion of the Kiowa must have occurred between that date and 1805, when Lewis and Clarke found the Cheyenne in possession of the same region, the Cheyenne being then at war with the Dakota. Curiously enough, there is no note of this war on any of the several Dakota calendars covering this period, described ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

CD llteJSl rmm 172 The Indian Advocate. '"" '" t ( la tl it ! ! ! t t j I Indian Lore' j 1 .! t. HERE are at present fifty-two Indian Nations in the United States, each of which has a dialect of its own. These fifty-two dialects are reducible to eight distinct families of languages, each of which differs from the others as the Latin, Slavonic, Germanic and Celtic languages of Europe differ radically from each other. As the Latin nation alities (the Italian, French, Spanish and Portu guese) speak cognate tongues, so also do the many Algonquin nations of the St. Lawrence Valley and the Lake Superior country. To the great Algon quin family belong the Algonquins, properly called, the Mon tagnais, the Abemakis of Maine, the Pequods and Narragan sets, the Delawares, the Ottawas, the Chippewas, the Illinois, the Sacs and Foxes (or Ontagamies), the Pottawatomies,-the Menominees, and, to some extent, the Crees also, of British America, in whose language many Algonquin words are to be found. ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

The Indian Advocate. 173 As to the origin of the Indian races, they are no doubt from Asia. We have seen in missionary periodicals photo graphic pictures of some Asiatic people, and we can truly say that they so closely resemble our Indians that there is no doubt about their common origin. Father Grellon, who had labored for years among the Hurons, of Canada, and had left that country after the destruction of the Huron Mission in 1648-49-50, and went to Asia, relates that he met, in Central Asia, a Chrit-tian Huron woman and heard her confession in the language which neither of them had spoken for years. This poor woman had been sold as a slave from tribe to tribe till she was brought far into the interior of Asia. There is no doubt that in remote times Asiatic tribes, many of. whom are still of roving, nomadic disposition, crossed Behring's Strait, and, once on American soil, pushed on southward and in other directions. Moreover, the many islands in the Pacific Ocean seem to indica...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

174 The Indian Advocate. mation of national features, color, intellectual capacity and other peculiarities. It is noticeable that our German, French, Irish and other foreign nationalities gradually undergo con siderable change of features after having been in this country many years. This is especially true of their descendants in. the second, third and further generations. WVAiiWVNAVWWW THE LETTER "S D a ID you ever think what a strange thing the letter S is? asks the Chicago Herald. It is a serpent in dis guise. Listen you can hear it hiss. It is the wiz ard of the alphabet. It gives possession and mul tiplies indefinitely by its touch. It changes a tree into trees and a house into houses. Sometimes it is very spiteful and will change a pet into a pest, a pear into a spear, a word into a sword and laughter into slaughter. Farmers have to watch it closely. It will make scorn of his corn and reduce every peck to a speck. Sometimes he finds it useful. If he needs more room for his st...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

The Indian Advocate. 175 $- The Month of the Sacred Heart. 0 F all the devotions which draw, by an irresistible sweetness, the hearts of nations and of conti nents, as well as of religious and social commu nities, none of the present day compete with the devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Cities, parishes, families, consecrate themselves to the Sacred Heart. Societies are formed in schools and colleges, and when the first Friday of any month in the year dawns, the communion rails are filled, again and again, with old and young, men and women, youths, maidens, and even children of ten der years all who have come to an age to receive our Lord in the Holy Sacrament of the Altar. Founded, as this devotion is, on the Incarnation, it comes fundamentally into the belief and practices of all Catholics, since He who is adored as God in Heaven and on earth may well claim for His divine Heart the adoration of ours, while there is a quality of tenderness in the devotion which give's it an u...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

176 The Indian Advocate. The whole world understands this, and when we put into words what the fact of the Incarnation has always implied, that the heart of the God-man was "in all things like unto our hearts, save without sin," every heart that lives, has ever lived or will live, understands the bond between the Heart of the Redeemer and itself; understands how His Heart is to be approached; how its approbation and love is to be won; how its treasures of grace and mercy and benediction are to be secured. And our "Month of the Sacred Heart?" That month of June, of which the American poet, Lowell, says: "Now, if ever, come perfect days." The full-blossoming time mild airs which are still fresh, the heat of summer being still delayed. Beautiful month of reparation as well as devotion, when fervent hearts are striving to atone for their own past coldness towards this loving Heart, as well as for the coldness and indifference of the world around us! Beautiful month, which, in the midst ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

The Indian Advocate. 177 JTHE INDIAN ADVOCATE J . ! Published by the Benedictine Fathers of . J J SACKED HEART MISSION. OKLAHOMA, jj j A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by our Regular Superiors. TERMS OP SDHSCRIPTIONl Single Copies 15c. Annual $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign $1.25. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma. IRIVH.KOKSl I. Every Subscriber and Benefactor will participate in all the merits, prayers and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. a. A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Every year, in the month of September, two Solemn Masses are sung for our Bene factors, one for the Living and one f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

178 The Indian Advocate. Herr Frederick Krupp, maker of guns and cannons, is the richest man in Germany. A practical comment on the' progress of civilization. We need guns and cannons to keep up civilization. The poor and blind world! - Envy is the daughter of pride, the author of revenge, the beginning of secret sedition and the perpetual tormentor of virtue. It is the filthy slime of the soul, a venom, a poison that consumeth the flesh and dryeth up the marrow of the bones. - The most powerful incentive to a virtuous life is not the eloquence, but example. The old poetic maxim is still true: Men are more moved by what they see than by what they hear. Our Lord began not to teach and to do, but to do and to teach; and those who are to carry on His work" must imi tate Him in this as in everything else. - The Holy Father is described by recent visitors to Rome as in unusually exuberant and sanguine spirits and, despite his incessant protests against encroachments upon the rights and f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

The Indian Advocate. 179, The water that flows from a spring does not congeal in , the winter. And those sentiments of friendship, which flow from the heart, cannot be frozen by adversity. Those who have felt the weight of personal adversity be come steadied thereby. The heart is strengthened by carry ing the private burden, so that it has immunity from the swarm of lesser evils. At the same time they are strong enough and ready to give a hand to others. As a novelist says of a Sister of Charity he describes: "She was ordained to her work by the world's heavy hand." Whisky and wife-beating, says Church Progress, seem to be inseparable companions among a certain class of intem perate brutes. It has been left to an Indian woman, how ever, to find a solution to their divorce. As a revenge for the beating she received, this wise wife tied the hands and feet of her drunken spouse, salted his hands,' face and clothing and put him out in the field where the cattle licked his exposed member...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

U i8o The Indian Advocate. there is also an all-important duty of Catholics at the ballot box and in politics a sacred duty which cannot be shirked and which will be mentioned at the judgment of the all knowing God. All due honor and praise to the fearless champion of Catholic Indian schools, Congressman Fitzger ald, of Massachusetts! Had there been more Fitzgeralds, our schools would be all right. It seems that Canada has been more successful in her treatment of the Indians than we have. The Sacred Heart Review summarizes the reasons why from a long article in the Transcript: "First, because in Canada agreements and treat ies with the Indians have been faithfully kept. Second, be cause up to the present time the Indian reservations of Canada have been kept comparatively free from the inrush of white settlers. Third, because the general character and efficiency of, the men in the Indian service in Canada is superior to those in the United States. Fourth, because the Canadian Governm...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

The Indian Advocate. 181 when weighed in that balance of profit and loss. If the pos session of the only true faith is so inestimable in value, what a dreadful, unspeakable misfortune it is to lose it! Every now and then we hear the cry ascend, "Make the South Catholic!" Very well; let us make it Catholic. The usual plan proposed is that of conversion. Experience has proved, however, that conversion is a slow process. The census now shows that New England is Catholic, yet it can not truthfully be said that the people of New England were converted to the Catholic faith. The change was brought about partly through the gradual extinction of the old race, but chiefly by the immigration of new races French Cana dians, Irish, Germans, Poles, Hungarians and such like. This fact is known to all. Now, it seems to us that the time has come when advantage may be taken of the steady stream of Catholic immigration pouring into this country and its course turned to account. Let us consider for a ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

182 The Indian Advocate. of immigration be turned in that direction, where the condi tions of life are healthier and homes more easy to obtain? Why should men be crowded together in shambles, where vice is, misery is, and moral death, when greater opportuni ties await them elsewhere? Let us make the South Catholic as New England was so made. There are priests in the South who will welcome the coming of these people and minister to their needs, and God is there as well as in the crowded cities. Go south and build homes, churches, schools love, hope, pray, toil, and the South will become Catholic and God be well pleased. Concluding Lines of the "Fall of the Indian." Yet sometimes in the gay and noisy street Of the great city, which usurps the place Of the small Indian village, one shall see Some miserable relic of that race Whose sorely-tarnished fortunes we have sung; Yet how debased and fallen! In his eye The flame of noble daring has gone out, And his brave face has lost its martia...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

n The Indian Advocaie. 183 mam am 1 r gr A Retrospect, 1877 1902. & 8f May 12, 1877, three strangers descended a bald hill in the then Pottawatomie Nation, Indian Territory, and took per manent possession of what was to be the future Sacred Heart Mission. They found but a log cabin, occupied by a married Our New Monastery. couple, who were serving the meals to the men employed in the construction of the first building of the Monastery. They were all Indians, and the travelers, just arrived from France (save one), had to content themselves to live under a tent over a month. We were assured that the rest of the

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

184 ' The Indian Advocate. community would soon follow; but the treacherous Cana dian more wicked than ever made them camp on its shores over eight days. It was on the eve of the feast of the Sacred Heart that they were able to cross, and hence the community chose the Sacred Heart as its patron. We were nine in num ber three priests, two clerics, two novices and two lay brothers. What a change since then! A new Territory has been been carved out, civilization has advanced, churches and schools have been erected and smiling crops are telling of the fertility of the soil; mines have developed, and today the once Indian Territory is looking forward to statehood, having all the requisites for it. Poor Sacred Heart was destroyed by fire last year, effacing our monastery, beautiful church, and every principal build ing save one the Convent of the Benedictine Sisters. Our new Monastery (a picture of which is given on the preceding page) is now finished and occupied. It is built of brick, w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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