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Title: Ranche And Range Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 January 1899

2 fiX f,e f!«r fie fi«r x«^ fie fi«r f,«r #i«r f?sr fi%r fie *,c #i«r f,«r fj«r. #i«r flr^c^r fjr fjr f,r fi«r $ Continue Their False Statements I ■* . ♦■ Js^ Y-Tj ) r =>| l^ iP Tlle Columbia Implement Company, Portland, Ore., continue their false statements in the Ranch *^£~j X{T" jJJIiPH X and Range of December Ist, and state they "simply reiterated the contents" of a circular of the Secre- fl^^ tary of the State Fair Association in the issue of October 20. In that issue their advertisement reads If \ HfeH If*S'fSlill'S^ "Both these firms had offered a separator as premium prior to our entering the field." * ""T^ 111 I jilliHll Hi The Secretary of the Fair Association made no such statement in his circular, and so it appears >|5r \ vj If I ill 'I'l that the Columbia Implement Company add another false statement to cover up the first falsehood. S -*rz+: \ il|i''JnßlliP|^ We never withdrew any offer of premium made by us or by any representative agent and we chal- j£* * ywk 'v...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 January 1899

RANCH AND RANGE Vol. 4, No. 43 WRITE TO YOUR REPRESENTATIVE. There is always a critical period in the history of eveFy enterprise, and such may be said at the pres ent time in regard to the dairy industry. The pres ent dairy law has been a good one, but the condi tions existing today have outgrown it. There will be presented to the legislature now in session ''amendments to the present dairy law which are in dispensable to further progress. Adulterated dairy products as well as adulterations of every kind are a deadly enemy of the farmer. The coal mine owner, the lumber dealer, in fact every line of in dustry, puts politics on the shelf when the laws which are to be enacted affect their pocketbooks. You shouM do the same. The sides of your pocket book may be close together and you cannot afford to be a lobbyist, but you can write a postal card or letter to the representatives from your county de manding their support in passing the amendment. Make your letter short and to the point....

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 January 1899

4 inches, the next three sets 2x12 inches, the next two 2xlo inches, then two sets 2xß inches, and the top one 2x6 inches. The top space being abor three feet. The center of the girts were kept in line, making the silo a little larger at top, which 1 think a good plan, for as the silage settles it crowds more firmly against the sides. For siding I used 8 inch shiplap. When this was put on, an opening was left about three feet wide, beginning with the third space between girts, this opening continuing to top, through which to put cut silage. This opening is next the feedway, which is six feet wide and just in front of cows. Also two spaces were left at top next driveway, about six feet wide, to make it more convenient filling. Then another thickness of shiplap, was put on with tared paper between, well lapped at edges. The second boards breaking joints of first, and not reaching openings left, by about two inches, so that when the shutters were put in place joints would be broken. Sh...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 January 1899

12th of this month, deferring as long as I well could, and even too long, but I want my silage to hold out in the spring time. Now some may be ready to say you have built your silo, raised your oats and peas, and clover and put into it, and fed it to your cows. But what we want to know is "Does it Pay?" This is a natural question, the answer of which, as I view it, must be sought for in results. And 1 think a fair consideration of this subject would not be complete or satisfactory without giving the results. But in order to make this satisfactory, other influences that have been brought to bear in bringing' about these results, should first be considered. Gov. Hoard will tell us; Prof. Spillman will tell us, and as practical dairymen we must all know *hat the food eaten by our cows is largely respon sible for the results. Of the other influences let us first note the other feeds that my cows have had, and of these, first the grain. During the late fall, winter and early spring 1 fee...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 January 1899

6 the education work which has been intrusted to my hands in this state. The function of the Agri cultural College and School of Science in this state and of similar institutions elsewhere is to bring the best that science has to offer to inform and elevate human industry. Such institutions mark a new thought in education. It is possible to take tne simplest and most ccmmon-place things and phen omena about us and make these the basis of the highest possible education, and it is possible in turn for an education thus gained to reflect upon industry and elevate it and make the conditions ot life easier and happier. But do not forget that it is possible for no elementary study of science to render such a service. Some folks have the idea that colleges of agriculture and mechanical arts should be very elemenutry in the education given. Do not believe it. Not only does the farm deserve the best that science has to offer, but it is only the best, the deepest investigation that can avail ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 January 1899

everything to feed will surely be found among the rear guard. There is temperament in cattle as in men. we speak of certain characteristics of an individual as indicative of certain temperaments. If this is true of man, and no one doubts it, it is equally true of animals. As the temperament of a man will large ly govern his possibilities in the world, so the tem perament of the cow will largely govern her possi bilities in the dairy. Temperament, then, governs functions. In the beef breeds the phlegmatic temperament is so thoroughly established that it is one of the dominant characteristics. If it were not so the great prize animals of our fat stock shows could never have been produced. Dairy temperament is synonymous with nerve power. Nerve power is dependent upon a large brain and large, strong spinal cord. A wide fore head and a strong back should be the requisites of a good dairy cow. If the brain is affected in any way the secretions are affected, and this is true when an anima...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 January 1899

8 Ranch and Range ISSUED KVKRV THURSDAY. In the interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists, and Stockmen of Washington' Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah, British Columbia. published BY thk RANCH AND RANGE COMPANY. Editorial Offices, .... Seattle, Wash. BUSINESS OFFICKS: Seattle, - - - 315-816 Pioneer building. Spokane, - - Suite F Hypotheek bank building. SUBSCRIPTION, IN ADVANCE, - $1.00 PKR YEAR. Address all communications to Kanch and Kange, 315-316 Pioneer building, Seattle, Washington. Who has Shorthorns for sale? If there are any stock breeders in the West who can supply 50 young heifers, or cows and a bull, of the Shorthorn or Durham breed, we have a customer. Write at once to Ranch and Range. -^. -^. "^. Grand Master Augustus High, of the State Grange, who contributed an interesting article on that or ganization in our issue of two weeks ago, has been elected president pro-tern of the state senate. ■^. -^. -^. At the State Dairymen's convention, when the re port of the committtee...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 January 1899

(Continued from page 7.) still, perhaps, the dairymen were doing very well Many among them made money. But we all know that such a practice would be ruinous today. Conditions have changed. The all-year-around dairy is fast taking the place of the six to seven-months dairy. When the pastures dry up toward fall, in order to relieve the dairy cow from a like misfortune, her ration must consist of something else than timothy hay, cornmeal, etc. Thus forced to abandon the "good old way," we are compelled to find a new way that will suit ex isting conditions. We now have with us the win ter dairy—that is to say, two-thirds of our herd freshen during the fall and early winter months. The great question that now presents itself to the owner of a winter dairy is the one of food for the winter. It must be a milk-producing food. In or der to realize a profit from the business, it must be a food most of which can be produced from the ranch. 'In its selection the question of cost is the great de...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 January 1899

10 generally very characteristic, the animal is down, unable to rise, she may be quite comatose, the breathing stertorous, the eyes staring; the boweis have ceased to act and the contents of the posterior part of the bowels is very hard and dry. The tem perature may vary greatly, from 95 to 105 degrees. Such are the symptoms as they are generally o» --serveu. I believe that any of you who have seen a typical case of milk fever will readily recognize these. The treatments have varied as much as the theo ries of the cause of the disease, from stimulants, as hot as can be given, to aconite in good large doses to lower the blood pressure, and the most of us have tried nearly all of them with good, indif ferent and bad results. If we should obtain a remedy which may act nearly as a specific, it will not pay us to throw over board everything that has been used prior to this. That is there are certain attentions which should be given every patient. She should be placed in comfortable quart...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 January 1899

If there is a dairy convention or farm institute within reach he attends it. His table will show the best literature in the land. No. 7 is a man who sneers at the cows of No. 10, at his books, dairy papers and registered bull. He says all these things are a humbug. One man makes money at every turn, the other shuts his eyes, ears and mind and keeps cows at an absolute loss and don't know it. The first man is going ahead, the other running behind. The difference of 32 cents per 100 in milk represents the value of putting brains, mental effort, into this business of keeping cows. That man deceives himself fearfully who thinks he is saving money by not spending money and time to know all he can concerning the cow. If we are going to the expense of keeping cows, caring for them, milking them, and all other expenses, we are foolish indeed if we do not work as far as possible towards two things; a better judgment in ourselves, and a better cow. If we improve our judgment we must keep post...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 January 1899

12 The cow is his manufacturing machine. She must be constructed to suit her purpose and his profit. It is our duty to know and practice these finer econ omies in constructing the cow and in her manage ment if we expect the larger per cent of profit. Here is one more hard fact to illustrate the loss that comes to men who persist in thinking that they don't need sound dairy knowledge and good cows to do business with. During the summer of 1898 the Kansas Agricul tural College made an investigation of the patrons of the Meriden Creamery to ascertain the income they were realizing per cow for milk sold to the creamery. The poorest cow averaged 7.54 annually, and the best one only $42.09, making a difference of $34.55 per cow. Taking the poorest five herds, the average per cow is $9.44 and for the best five only 33.74, a difference of $24.30, or 257 per cent. Where records have been kept, it has been found that it takes from $20 to $30 to pay for keeping a cow in Kansas. It will thus be...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 January 1899

HARKET REPORT. Potatoes were way up last week, but have now dropped. The high price was caused by the snow here west of the mountains, and was purely speculative. The price will probably go lower rather than higher. Potatoes—Native Burbanks, $18@20; Yak ima Burbanks, $20@25. Apple market is steady. Apples—Fancy, 76c@$l; very fancy, $1® 1.50; apples, cooking, 25@50c. To quote them In another way, they are: Belleflower, 50c@$l: King, 50c@$l; Spitzen berg, 75c@51.50; Baldwin, 50c@>$l; Gloria Mundi. 40©50 c. Greenings, 50@60c; Celery, 40c per doz; hothouse lettuce, 40c; onions, silverskins, 5080 c; cabbage, l@lM>c per lb for native; parsnips, 75c per sack. Hran, $15; shorts, $16. <* PAYING PRICKS. nutter—Ranch, lB@20c; fancy dairy, 20® 22c; native creamery, 25@26V6c; storage creamery, 22c. There is a medium demand for poultry. Live poultry—Chickens, 10c; turkeys, 12c; ducks, 10@llc per lb. Ranch eggs are lower, being 24@27c. Live stock—Choice beef cattle, cows, 2% @3c- steers. ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 January 1899

14 STATE DAIRY SCHOOL. Pullman, Wash., Jan. 4, 1899. Editor Ranch and Range: Please note that the Dairy School, in connection with the Washington Agricultural College and School of Science begins on Monday, March 13, 1899, and continues 10 weeks. Accommodations will be provided for 20 students. Should more than that number apply, preference will be given to those having had most experience. For further information apply to W. J. SPILLMAN, Professor of Agriculture. Bulletin on Cherries. The Oregon Agricultural College Experiment Sta tion has recently issued a bulletin on cherries. The bulletin was prepared by Prof. G. W. Shaw. After giving a full explanation of the experiments and tests, says the Portland Tradesman, the treatise closes with the following statement of the food con stituents of the average cherry: Water 81.25 Dry matter 18.75 Total 100.00 The dry matter is thus composed: Sugar 11.21 Albumenoids 91 Fat and carbohydrates 5. G7 Acid 43 Ash 53 Total 18.75 "It is evident fr...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 January 1899

Pacific ■ Jacob Hettrick, * J | Local and district agents C^ f\€\ CI" _ flQiiir wanted on all parts of the V/vCl^ MS. Pacific Coast. yelm, w n . a Jj Ik la a Cream Separator a paying Invest /% j\</\^^ /"* 7" ll H ment? If you keep cows, what is your ob /-% VF IT! I I 1 > V I jHB ject In so doing? What system do you •*■ *-3^ '■"M'^r mJ \m ■n% use to cream your milk? What per cent. *—-* *^ W IKI of the fat In the milk are you able to get . . __^ > _ \AB\ with the present system? What Is the .jl' I "A 1• _ A — _^ V|B\ cost in time, labor and ware? Do not wait .'£' '■— d /~f I 4 #^ /^ B^P^^^N^ until you see how your neighbor Is going I \L A I l.^Cir ' ißfl^ t0 make a separator pay; figure It out I iVll l^Ah-'^^ yourself. Buy an "Eclipse Separator" at MT SRSBj once and get your share of Increased prof kBHHHP^W' its gained by the use of a separator. All Cream Separatorsli^iim jgSSfcsrsFA bX?S -J". :ss ■^ '-lh. bricks Winter Apples Wanted Potatoes, Onions, Hay, Grain, Creamery and...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 12 January 1899

J. R ADAMS. Wholesale and Retail Cash Grocer, 512 Second Aye., Seattle, Wash. Will Save You Honey "- \ On Every Article You Use In The Grocery Line. Send Adams your name and your friend's name, so he can mail you his price list. Write for special cash prices on anything you need. Best American fine Granulated Sugar, |5.95 for lOJ-pound sacks. Star Tobacco, 39c per pound. JP AHAIVIQ Wholesale and Retail Cash Grocer, • I^» r\LJrAlv\&i 512 Second Aye., Seattle, Wash. I SEED - - SEED { | _ just RECEIVED — 8 { SEVERAL CAR LOADS OF 8 | Choice Garden Field Grass & Flower Seed Slii 1 1 LILLY BOGARDUS & CO., Inc., Seattle | I ..;..;.. Wholesale --:--:— 8 | HAY, GRAIN, FLOUR, FEED, CEREALS, SALT, ETC. | t WRITE US FOR PRICES . 8 RANCH AND RANGE.

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 January 1899

hAhch Amp sffi* 4^' ISSUED EVERY WEEK I|jfr Vol. 4, No. 45 I While the U. S. Separator shows testimonial letters from the following ||| $:Q Agricultural Experiment Stations: lowa, Minnesota, Cornell and Massachusetts, 'fsi %j-:\ f bear in mind that the De Laval Separator is blessed with letters likewise and of a 111 |H more recent date, as the following testify: p| te|f£ Massachusetts Agricultural College. Cornell University Experiment Station. *N*§ §§g Amheret, Mass., Jan 12, 1898. Ithaca, N. V., Jan, 10, 1898. . g|f§ dl ,^ v "We have used a De Laval 'Baby' No. 3 separator daily in "After another year's experience I see no .reason to alter itSßs ££% our Dairy School during the past severall terms* separating the opinion regarding the 'Alpha' De Laval separators express- US/ HIS from 600 lbs. to 1200 lbs. of mdlk at a run, and with an aver- ed by me a year ago, which was as follows: |r|2|g \ WJS! . age speed of 5812 rev. per minute have obtained an average "Bedng asked to revise the...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 January 1899

2 % Do you Contemplate the Purchase of a new Threshing Rig % J^r This year? Would it not be wise to investigate as to whose machinery gives the best satisfaction on ds»* J^P this coast? If so write us for Catalogue, flailed free on application. J *'i\fl^. Js^ l^llf^lllvJi nL^: Threshers, :dsr* JSaw Mills, -♦ THE " RUSSELL" COMPOUND TRACTION ENGINE TAKES THE LEAD. # -^*: It is built in several sizes and is a wood and straw burner. Write for particulars. 4 Russell & Co., - Portland, Ore. $ Jjk; 320-324 Belmont St. and 160-166 East First St. J^ j»'* y* y* y* y* y* j*^ y* >^^ yt^ yt^ yt^ ** yt^ ■** ** yt^ yt^ j&. y* y* y* & 4* Kill the Bug's! ftffV UW JILjT >^ most complete line of Sorav Pumos lncludinis •• • • v^J^p=^uL I iiH I Hydraulic Sprayers Also Pumps for Whitewashing (fe|iiS» V fell IfcErJ |k/ Tumps fitted In any way wanted. Send for circular. ' If ™ x^M Da 1 c 011 =W^ll i" on H i*rl w CTn fi°- ws m our standard spray \ :== __J? r^Ul^Ull IILUII 111UYV. VU. pump...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 January 1899

RANCH AND RANGE Vol. 4, No. 45 RATION FOR DAIRY HERD. I have a herd of 125 cows, and I enclose you a formula of my present ration as follows: ' —Digestible Nutrients- Organic Carbo- Matter. Protein, hydrates. Fat. 20 lbs timothy hay 16.48 .60 8.78 .24 20 lbs. mangels 1.60 .22 .96 .— B Ib* chop 4-28 .61 2.36 .14 p j bran 4.14 .63 2.20 Totals 26~44 2.06 14.30 .62 If it is not asking too much, please advise me where I am off. D. S. T. Hadlock, Wash. The foregoing formula presents lees digestible protein than is accounted desirable, if the chop mentioned is, as we suspect, what is generally termed middlings. If the hay, or even half of it, was clover, this defect would be remedied, and clover, we are told, grows to perfection in the state of Washington. But clover cannot be had for the present time, and possibly not for the next year. Pea vine hay makes an excellent substitute for clover, and unless there is clover seeding coming forward for next season, we suggest sowing some oats and ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 January 1899

4 of the cash value." Great care is taken not to value any property too high. "Art. 16. No insurance in this company shall take effect until the amount of property insured or made liable for the losses shall amount to $25,000." The insured amount at present is 50,000. BY-LAWS. Article I.—The Members. "Sec. 1. Any member by getting insured shall give to and deposit with the board of directors a note for 3 per cent of the amount of his insurance. Said note bears no interest, but shall be secured to the board's satisfaction; it shall be due when he fails to pay his assessment in case of fire." On these notes depends the stability of the con cern, therefore very great care is being exercised in accepting people's notes, but as the soliciting agent is instructed to find out the farmers' financial standing before he gets to them, he always knows beforehand whether he can accept a man's note or not, and not only that, but the note has to be in dorsed by a second party, so as to make it dou...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 26 January 1899

Osceola; S. L. Sorenson, iFleusted; E. A. Boatman, Orting; A. L. Meeker, Sumner; Alfred Brannan, Auburn. A FARMER. THE LYLE FRUIT OU.TLOOK. The copy of Ranch and Range for December 29, 1898, to hand. The statement, on page 8, "Nothing like it," is slightly in error, as Mr. Kroenung'a ranch is seven miles from the town of Lyle, the only landing and shipping point, but one of the best on the Columbia river. Mr. Kroenung has what will make a good fruit ranch in time. He has quite a number of young fruit trees set that in a few years will be in bearing. The James Fitz orchard, adjoining the Kroenung farm on the west, is exceptionally well handled. Part of it has been in bearing for three years, pro ducing fruit that is second to none. James Morgan's ranch joins Mr. Kroenung on the south. He has a fine young orchard out. Some of the trees should bear the coming season. Mr. Mor gan is a street car conductor in Portland, Or. He is an active, intelligent, go-ahead man, that will undoubtedly...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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