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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1996

luly 1996 Farm Bureau News Couple finds simple life on farm ARARAT —Before Frank Levering took over his father's orchard business, he was a Hollywood screenwriter. He co-wrote the screenplay for Demi Moore's debut film, "Parasite," which was among the 15 top-grossing movies of 1982. Movie-goers wore special glasses to watch it in 3-D. "It's still in video stores, but I think it's because it was Demi Moore's first movie," Levering said. Mrs. Moore was 19 in 1981 when the movie was filmed in a desert outside of Los Angeles. "I spent a lot of time on the set with Demi Moore and really got to know her," Levering said. "She was nice and friendly to everyone and always smiling." He co-wrote the script with two other screenwriters. "I met them at a party and we cooked up this idea for a horror film," Levering said. "It was a take-off on the old-fashioned monster films of the 1950s—sort of quirky and scary. It's about a scientist, who after a nuclear holocaust, tries to save the world after...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1996

Farm Bureau News Wildlife officials seeking public input on hunting (Continued from page 1) ments on hunters who hunt on their farmland. "Maybe hunters could be required to bag more does," Duncan told Everett. Harvesting female deer is a key to controlling the deer population, wildlife officials often point out. To do that , Virginia has the most liberal deer hunting season and bag limits in the nation. In Virginia, it's possible that one hunter could legally kill more than 170 deer in one season by obtaining a license for bow hunting, muzzleloader hunting and general firearms hunting. A hunter could kill twice that many by participating in DMAP. That wouldn't be realistic, but it would be legal, Duncan pointed out. Through their crops, farmers unintentionally "feed a lot of deer," Wayne F. Pryor, a VFBF board member, told wildlife officials. Pryor questioned whether hunters respect the property of farmers. "Hunting isn't a right; it's a privilege," responded William L. Woodfin Jr.,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1996

July 1996 Committees urged to sponsor safety events Safety is a subject close to most women's hearts, but especially farm women's. We know how important it is that tractors have rollover protection bars, that the power takeoff shafts on equipment have shields, and that farm vehicles display "slow moving vehicle" signs. We also know how important it is that children know how to dial 9-1-1, that drivers and passengers buckle up before riding in a car, and that all households have a poison control number handy. Since we're so safety conscious, many of our committees are constantly on the lookout for ways to promote safety in their counties. Virginia Farm Bureau's Safety Coordinator Bruce Stone said that the women's committees "can be vital players in the Farm Bureau's overall safety efforts." He added, however, that the women need to Attn: SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS f i ...J L*s. W-" jwp D M nj Insurance seem to be a which just keeps up your company's There is a solution! Call the Virginia ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1996

Farm Bureau News Election year politics could stall farm agenda What can farmers expect from Washington in the remainder of this year? Probably not much. Because this is a presidential election year, Congress will be in session far less than normal, taking long breaks for both political par- ties' conventions and then attempting to adjourn in early October so members can campaign for their own seats. Congress and the president have started work on the fiscal 1997 budget even though they just completed work on the '96 spending plan. After the government shutdown strategy boomeranged on congressional "I Can't Believe It," She Says Woman "Rubs Away" Arthritis Pain After Reading Free Booklet Man Ends Backache Misery, Plays Tennis Again CHICAGO (special)-Neighbors were astounded when a woman who for years had suffered from arthritis was discovered busily sweeping her walkway The woman then exercised by riding a bicycle. Asked about her transformation, she explained that she had read a pr...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1996

July 1996 Did you miss spring planting? Then plant for fall harvest Where spent spring crops have been taken out of the garden, don't yield to the summer doldrums and / let weeds take over productive space. Increase your plot's yield while deterring weed growth by planting new crops in empty places. Some of the best quality produce comes from the warm days and cool nights of fall. These conditions add sugar to sweet corn and crispness to carrots. Succession plantings of warm season crops, such as corn and beans, make them available for The amazing walk-behind brush cutter! The DR® FIELD and BRUSH MOWER CLEARS & MAINTAINS meadows, pastures, roadsides, fences, wooded and rough non-lawn areas with ease. Mows over 1/2 acre per hour! CUTS tall grass, weeds, brush, brambles, sumac - even tough saplings up to 1" thick! Plus CHOPS and MULCHES most everything it cuts; leaves NO TANGLE of material to trip over or to pick up like hand-held brush cutters and sicklebair mowers. POWER...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1996

Farm Bureau News (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words in Single letters or figures and groups of figures ad. (Example: a 1 5-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552. You do not have to use this coupon. Richmond, VA 23261. CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. > Deadline: Ads must be received by the 10th of each month. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. (FOr your convenience we are providing this coupon. Please submit ad...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1996

July I 996 The Farmers Market (Continued ) MAGIC COOKIE BAR -- recipe. $2 send S. A. S. E. to: Peggy Mitchell, P. O. Box 1183, Tappahannock, Va. 22560. TROY-BILT — rototillers discount prices. Call Hickory Hill Nursery, 540-942-3871. HEDGE AGAINST — inflation, buy American Eagle gold coins, purchase below mint prices. I -800-849-7291, leave message. FOR SALE — hand-made quilts. 540-880-2182. NOW! — Frozen tomato slices. Garden fresh flavor, year round. Complete, easy, instructions. $I, Hamiltons, Box 652, New Ulm, Mn. 56073. COLDWATER DILLPICKLES! - Can in minutes. No hot brine, delicious, crisp. Recipe, $I, Hamiltons, Box 652, New Ulm, Mn. 56073. SAVE 75 PERCENT ON WORK CLOTHES! - Good, clean, recycled in very best quality. Money-back guarantee, free brochure. Suntex Recycling, toll-free, 1-800-909-9025, 24 hours, seven days. COMPUTERS - 486 DX2BO/ 586 100, 400MB-I.IGIGB harddrives, 4/16-MRAM, VGA monitor, prices starting $725. 540-872-7018. 1985 BAYLINER BOAT — 16 feet. 85 H.P., m...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1996

HHHj 77)© Voice of Virginia's Agricultural Producers g T 1?! Its easy —just call our toll free number 1-800-229-7779 or contact your local Farm Bureau Office TRIGON Trigon Blue Cross Blue Shield The Farm Bureau Advantage — Another Savings Opportunity Your Farm Bureau membership benefits will offer substantial discounts on other insurance products such as Homeowner, Auto and Life provided through other insurance carriers. Plus you will receive discounts on home and garden equipment and supplies, travel services...and many other products. Contact the Virginia Farm Bureau to take advantage of the benefits offered by the 3 new Medical Insurance Programs from Trigon Blue Cross Blue Shield. 3 New Insurance Programs That Give You The Power yfcH O/* Choice For Your Health Care Coverage And will give you the protection you deserve when you need medical attention . . The new Farm Bureau Programs* offer you: ► Greater Choice Than We Have Offered Before You choose the coverage... the doctors......

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1996

Farm Bureau News Volume 55, Number 7 Beef cattle producers still seeing low prices By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor U.S. beef cattle producers are getting trampled on by the pork and poultry industries, record-high feed prices and an oversupply of cattle. "We're down, but not out," said Raymond Buchanan, president of the Virginia Cattlemen's Association. "As long as consumption of beef stays up, we're all right." As prices remain low, cattle producers with off-farm jobs or other sources of income are likely to sell part of their herd. Some small producers already have sold half or more of their herd, Buchanan said. For those seeking a long-term investment, it's a good time to buy cattle, said Jim Johnson, a fieldman with the Virginia Cattlemen's Association. His organization conducts sales and helps market about 160,000 cattle in Virginia annually. Tack theft on the rise in Virginia By Chris Baxter Staff Writer and Designer FAIRFAX—Horse owners need to keep a watchful eye on t...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1996

Farm Bureau News Taxes, education top policy development By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor Property taxes, sludge fertilizer and agriculture education are among key issues that Farm Bureau leaders began discussing in July. A major function of Farm Bureau is to solve problems of its members, said Alex Hamilton, director of public affairs for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. Farm Bureau leaders focus on issues to present to state and national lawmakers for consideration. Leaders from Farm Bureau's seven districts gathered for policy development meetings during the last half of July. On Nov. 6 and 7, the VFBF Resolutions Committee will meet in Staunton to discuss policies. Committee members will develop a consensus on issues for the VFBF Annual Convention, which is Dec. 2-5 in Richmond. Some Virginia resolutions could reach the floor of discussion at the American Farm Bureau Federation Annual Meeting in Nashville Jan. 5-9. Voting delegates from each state attend the national m...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1996

August 1996 1950s food safety law will hopefully be reformed After several delays and postponements, Congress in mid-July was moving toward repealing a food safety law based on 1950s era science. On July 17, the House of Representatives Commerce Committee passed reform legislation that would replace the tired, outdated Delaney Clause, which requires "zerotolerance" of pesticide residues in food. If approved, the new law, known as the Food Quality Protection Act (H.R. 1627), will end the threat for farmers of losing about a dozen important field crop protectants. The Clinton administration voiced its support of the bi-par-tisan reform measure. At press time, the measure was expected to pass the House floor and the Senate and then enter a Farmers looking for answers from presidential candidates This month both major political parties will hold their conventions. Bob Dole is the presumptive candidate of Farm Focus the Republican party, and President Clinton is seeking re-election. Both...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1996

Farm Bureau News Sweet treats come from summer's surplus This is the time of year when you may find that your garden and your kitchen have become over- loaded with the fruits and vegetables of your summer harvest. Instead of just freezing, canning or distributing your surplus to friends and family, try turning some of these garden delights into deliciously sweet treats. Berries of any type, peeled and chopped peaches and nectarines, or grated zucchini and carrots make great tasting additions to your favorite muffin or quick bread recipes. Fruits and vegetables also enhance the nutritional content of recipes by adding vitamins, minerals and fiber. Because produce adds moisture to baked goods, you can easily reduce the amount of fat called for in your recipe by 25 percent without sacrificing the texture. The coffee cake and muffin recipes that follow have already been modified in fat content. Canola oil is used in place of shortening, butter or margarine because it is rich in unsatura...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1996

August 1996 Farm Bureau backs new Extension director BLACKSBURG—The state's largest farm organization is pleased with the appointment of Dr. C. Clark Jones as the new director of Virginia Cooperative Extension. The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, which represents approximately 35,000 of the state's 47,000 full- and part-time farmers, believes Jones' experience and leadership will be a boost to Virginia agriculture. Jones has worked with Extension for nearly two decades and has served the past year as interim director. During this period, he has overseen a major restructuring effort within the organization. "Dr. Jones is an excellent choice to lead Extension into the next century," noted VFBF President C. Wayne Ashworth. "His wide range of experience here in Virginia, his knowledge of farmers' needs and his commitment to promoting Extension will serve us all well." While interim director, Jones worked with other university administrators in fashioning one of the most comprehensive r...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1996

Farm Bureau News Farm crayfish demand is increasing PETERSBURG—Most people associate crayfish with the bayous of Cajun country, but demand for the delicacy is growing rapidly and many Virginians are looking at crayfish as an interesting new farming venture. "This is one way land in certain areas that may not be as productive could be turned to an alternative crop that could bring some added profit to the farmers," explained Dr. Brian Nerrie, an aquaculture Extension specialist at Virginia State University. Crayfish are small crustaceans that look like bite-size lobsters, taste like crabs and grow in freshwater. Getting started in the business is not difficult, Nerrie said. "The ponds that they're grown in are relatively shallow. It does not require a lot of earth moving. Water quality is important so you need to have a good water supply," Nerrie said. "It's a self-replicating population, so once the crayfish are stocked in your pond and you harvest some of them the remainder will re...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1996

August 1996 Stolen saddles, bridles rarely are recovered (Continued from page 1) as well as to help recover stolen property. "I believe it's a ring. It's organized. They have an established way to get rid of the saddles to get money." It is possible that the stolen tack is being transported across state lines, Folsom said. That would explain why the tack is never recovered near the location from which it was taken. In fact, most stolen tack is never recovered, he added. With a horse population of close to 225,000, Virginia is a good target for tack thieves, Folsom said. The state's road system attracts them as well. Most of the recent tack thefts have occurred near interstate highways. "Virginia's highway system is excellent and provides a rapid means of escape," he explained. "So you put a lot of horses with an easy route to escape and you begin to have more and more problems." Most cases of tack theft have occurred in the afternoon when the horse owner is away at work. Although in...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1996

Farm Bureau News Beef cattle prices may improve by '97 or '98 (Continued from page 1) 1978. "After we work the numbers of cattle down somewhat, prices will come back up," Richman said. Meanwhile, the low price cycle is "very hurtful to cow-calf operations, especially with the high grain prices." added Richman, who has Angus and Charolais cattle in Shenandoah County. "We'll come back to a more stable market by 1998," Johnson said. "We could see light at the end of the tunnel in late 1997." Average prices reached a high of 94 cents a pound for 500-pound steers in the fall of 1993 in Virginia. This was for graded feeder cattle in sales conducted by the cattlemen's association. These are cattle that go to feedlots to put on weight and then to meat packers for final processing. By the fall of 1994, average prices had dropped to 79 cents and then to 65 cents by 1995. Most calves coming off the farm are sold in the fall. Prices then will be about the same or slightly lower than those of 19...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1996

August 1996 Stores team up with cattle group to move meat fasfe samples help sell more retail beef By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor Beef producers want to see Americans hurry to stores and restaurants and buy tons of beef, America has too many cattle, and cattle feed prices have skyrocketed. Eat more beef; that's the solution, according to the National Cattlemen's Beef Association. To help make that happen, cattle producers in Virginia are paying a $1 checkoff per animal sold. Half goes to the Virginia Cattlemen's Industry Board, and the rest goes to the national association. The national association is running "Beef. It's What's For Dinner" commercials nationwide this summer and expects to reach 5b million women. Ads are appearing in several women's magazines. So far, the ad campaign has resulted in 2,000 recipe requests from consumers each week. The effort is expected to help sell 510 million additional pounds of beef this summer. The Virginia beef industry collected nearly ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1996

Farm Bureau News Caution needed on roads with farm equipment By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor A speeding car can catch up with a slow-moving tractor in just seconds. This poses a serious hazard if a car rounds a curve or tops a hill and comes up on a tractor on the other side. To help motorists quickly see tractors and farm equipment, state law requires a bright orange triangular sign on the back of farm equipment using public roads. It's known as a "slow-moving vehicle" sign. The risk of a tractor-related wreck is greatest in rural areas during the spring, summer and fall when farmers are planting crops, harvesting them or cutting hay or silage, said Bruce Stone, safety coordinator for the Virginia Farm Bureau. In just 7 seconds, a car traveling 400 feet at 55 mph will reach a tractor going 15 mph, Stone noted, adding that a football field is 300 feet long. A farmer died in April in Page County after a delivery truck sideswiped his tractor on a public road. The truck had appr...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1996

August 1996 Delaney could make retail food cost more (Continued from page 1) replaced with a unified safety standard, a standard that will ensure the protection of our food quality standards by allowing the approval of pesticide tolerances when there is a reasonable certainty that no harm will come to the consuming public", said U.S. Rep. Thomas J. Bliley Jr., R-Va., chairman of the House Commerce Committee. After months of congressional delays, this action will likely be a big relief for farmers who recently voiced concerns about the potential impact of the outdated Delaney Clause. "It's scary," said Nelson County apple grower Tom Bomar before the committee changes were announced. "It would put a lot of farmers out of business," explained Northumberland County soybean producer Rob Hall. Without reform, the Delaney Clause, which is part of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, would cancel nine commonly used chemicals, possibly as early as the 1997 growing season. It would place ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1996

Farm Bureau News VFBF grabs four national awards St. PETERSBURG, FLA.—The sun shone on the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Communications Department, which brought home four national awards and an honorable mention from the Sunshine State June 25. The awards, which recognize state Farm Bureaus for their excellence in media relations, print and broadcast reporting, photography and design, were given by the American Farm Bureau Federation at its annual information conference. Virginia's four awards were matched only by the Kansas Farm Bureau which also garnered four awards in the 60,000-member and over category. Virginia won awards for Best Media Relations Program, Best Audio Visual Presentation, Best Print News Story and Best Photo Essay. VFBF Communications Director Greg Hicks and his staff shared the media relations award, which recognizes a state for its year-long efforts in generating positive news coverage through the media. "The media relations program is very effective... base...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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