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Elephind.com contains 110,008 items from Weekly Times, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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HART ON THE WING CONTROL INSTINCT RELAXES [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

HART ON TiHE WING CONTROL. INSTINCT RELAXES i W. E. Hart, the aviator, made several flights at Richmond (N.S.W.) on Janu ary 19, the first since he met with an accident in the same locality fifteen months ago. The flights were made in a bi plane constructed by himself. His long est was three miles, with a passenger, at a height of 150 feet. When he landed from .his last flight a wire attached to the wheels snapped, and part of the landing gear was damaged. 'Hart states that he does not intend to fly professionally again. He- will only make ascents to please himself or in aid of charity. .He remarked that his long absence from the pilot's seat had caused him to lose the instinct of con- J trolling the levers for the time being, ! and he had. to watch every movement, j whereas, prior to the accident, he' worked the controls instinctively.

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

HOWARD S. BELL, D.O., F.V.O.A., Eyesight Specialist P&ton's Buddings, 115 Elizabeth street (Next McSwan's), .Melbourne. Clients whose sight we have tested and fitted with our incomparable lenses have testi fied to the comfort and satisfaction they have experienced. Our scientifically fitted glasses are indis pensable to you if your sight is defective or your vision is not as distinct as it ougbt to be. WORLD'S RECORD SMASHERS BREEDING PENS FOR SALE AT HALF-PRICE. Five and Unrelated Male of Any of the Breeds as Below, 40/. Send for a Pen. Don't delay. Absolute satisfaction guaranteed or vour money re funded. ANDALUSIANS, BROWN LEGHORNS, WHITE LEGHORNS (Pad man, Kianear, American and other strains), BLAC-K OR PINGTONS. BUFF or WHITE ORPINGTONS, MINORCAS. BARRED and WHITE PLY MOUTH ROCKS, SILVER WYANDOTTE?. WHITE WYANDOTTES, SILVER - GREY DORKINGS, and INDIAN GAME. AYLESBURY, PEKIN, and MUSCOVY, and the WORLD RENOWNED INDIAN RUN NERS. r have my own strain tested to 15-i eggs, a...

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
EGG-PRESERVING A NEW PROCESS [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

A NEW PROCESS A French, engineer, M. Lesearde, has developed a new process for preserving eggs, which is said to be much supe rior to the common cold-storage me thod. As everyone knows, the ordin ary methods of cold storage for eggs are far from perfect, partly, perhaps, because certain microbes withstand freezing temperature without serious hurt; moreover, eggs as ordinarily han dled are affected by the surrounding air through the effects of evaporation. For these reasons prolonged cold stor age markedly impairs the value of eggs. It is found that by the Lesearde' pro cess eggs may be kept as long as ten months, while the limit for the custom ary process is about four months. Moreover, the eggs stored on the new plan retain a much better quality. The inventor, in fact, claims that they can be sold as fresh eggs, and that it is impossible to detect any difference. In carrying out the Lesearde process, according to the "Scientific American," the eggs are set up upon a piece of cardbo...

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE HUMORIST [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

Her Father (sternly): Young man, can you support my daughter in t'he style she's been accustomed? Lover (briskly): I can, but I'd be ashamed to. Louis: Uncle, what's chagrin? Uncle: "Well, it's what a stout cnan feels when he runs his hardest and jumps on a tramcar that doesn't start for ten minutes. She: Mr Brown does not pay his wife much attention. He: No. The only time I ever knew of his going out with her was one time when the gas exploded. , "Where is the Island of Ceylon situated?" the schoolmaster asked. "Don't know, sir," answered the dull boy of the class. "Don't you know where tea comes from?" "Yes, sir; mother borrows it from the next-door neighbor." First Girl: I like a man with a past. A man with a past is always interesting. Second Girl: That's true; but I don't think it's nearly as interesting as a man with a future. Third Girl: The man who interests me is the man with a present; and the more expensive the present is the more interest I take in it. , The people of a ...

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SELECTION OF THE MAYING HEN USE OF TRAP NESTS [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

| SELECTION OF THE MAYING HEN USB OF TRAP NESTS To make a success, it is imperative j that we know our hens. We must test their abilities. We cannot afford to keep drones (says a writer in the Canadian "Maritime Farmer.") There fore we must adopt methods by which we can determine the good from the bad. Noticing a hen repeatedly upon the nest is not a guarantee that she is about to lay. In using trap nests I have almost daily captured hens on the nest, but no eggs, and their annual records were very low. Every time a hen cackles when com ing -off the nest is no criterion that she has laid. X believe it was Collingwood who once said "a cackling hen is either a layer or a liar," and in using trap nests I have found quite a number of these cacklers to be "liars." So, prior to the adoption, of trap nests, the selection of layers has been more or less" guess work. It was said by some writers that "spare and leggy birds are the best layers." This opinion, no doubt, was based upon the fact ...

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

i Wo U. BLACKHAM, PRODUCE SALESMAN, 59-61 KING ST., MELBOURNE. Highest Current Prices Secured for Coasfga merits of— BUTTER, EGGS, POULTRY, CARCASS VEAL and PORK; And .FRUIT of All Descriptions. Sales Weekly. Prompt Returas, Correspondence IaYitod. aKSS£5$^aS^^^EB$SSS38SmB®SOT2 S3JK3SS5 Pianos Beohsteisi Lipp Feupfch Ecke Thumfep - Ttisrt b obii'bitaiy C9 better value to bo Qbtslocd (a AmtraSfe. S£ND FOB FRgE ILLUSTRATED AND DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE Q2. SOLE AGENTS> SffifewS" Melbourne, Bcndigo, Geclo&g. May be purchased by easy Instalments S^aBSAtahaaaaagl Full value allowed for your old Piano &» part payment

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

LEARN T0_HYPNOTJSE , INSTRUCTION FREE I You can become a Hypnotist In a few hour's time without leaving your home. You can «Tway tfce minds of others, control fellowship Ind affection, cure disease and bad habits, Gratify your ambitionB, and produce amuse ment by the hour. My mammoth Illustrated Son or Key to Hypnotism, which! send fr#>a of charge and postage paid, will tell you «ii about this marvellous science. It con tains beautiful ana artistic engravings, and shows you just what Hypnotism is, and what it will accomplish. Send for it, and learn to fcytmotise. Remember, this wonderful book costs you nothing. A chance of a lifetime. Write to-day. Address— ' . CI. H. BARRADflN, Dept. W.T., Pitt street, SYDNEY,

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
POULTRY QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

By "UTILITY" . QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 'Anxious (Gippsland).—The trouble Is known as chicken-pox. Wash the affected parts ■with Condy's fluid (diluted). Then rub dry j with a soft cloth. Anoint the parts with white zinc ointment. Rub the eyelids with vaseline to prevent them sticking together. : Repeat this treatment every day, and give Epsom salts in the drinking water. Rhode Island.—The trouble is known as disease of the liver. It is generally brought about by irregular feeding or too much heat ing and stimulating food. Give the affected bird powdered rhubarb and lard in the form j of a pill. Soak grain in lime water, feeding very sparingly. Green i'ood can be supplied in abundance. Wash the eyes with boracic j acid lotion, and then anoint with vaseline. ! L.F.J.—-The ducks have a form of paralysis. Paint the vertebrae (from the neck to the tail) with acetic acid, repeating every four hours. . 2. Salt should only be^ given in very email quantities to either duck's or fowls. T, M. (S...

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CAUSES OF SWARMING INSTRUCTIVE DEDUCTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

CAUSES OF SWARMING INSTRUCTIVE DEDUCTIONS. Mr Albert Gale, the well-known apiarist, points out that as spring cid vances. and bee food becomes more plentiful bees seem to'realise the con ditions necessary for swarming. As queens do not leave the hive, after the return from their marital flight; until they go forth with the first • spring swarm, the swarming conditions must be arrived at by the queen noting the abundance of the food supplies brought in by the bees, and the genial warmth of spring. These auxiliai'ies conduce to the rapid increase in worker , brood followed by drone production. Drones, as their strength of j^jwer and flight increase, do not remain in the hive like young workers, but are eager to gfc't on the wing. During the warmest parts of the spring days their deep huni can be heard , in mid-air, and they may be seen busy at the entrance to the hives. This is a sure indication that queen cells are in progress, and young queens are developing. "When looking through t...

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

FOUNDED 1864. Pupils prepared !or Junior ana Senior Public and other Examinations, Pupils (from 7 years) specially cared for in the Preparatory Department. Reside Pupils under personal supervision of the Principal and Mrs Parson. - nt Splendid Modem Buildings, Playing Fields (nearly 10 acres in extent), Exceiie provision lor all. school games, Tennis, Rowing, etc. Splendid, bracing climate. FIRST TERM 1914, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10. Illustrated Prospectus on Application. . ■ 0\ A. S. M. PARSON, B.A., Principal.

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE BEEKEEPER QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS Honey Mead.—G.C. (Jeparit).—To make honey mead, 'put into a clean boiier five gal lons of soft water. When hot, add one quart pure honey. Boil gently for one hour and a half, skimming often. Empty into earthen vessel, and when, blood warm pour into a clean cask. The bung should be put in loosely. If thecellai is warm fermentation will begin in from five to 15 days. After 14 days' fer mentation, draw off into another casit, leav ing the dregs. In the second cask fermenta tion should be allowed to go on from 10 to 14 days. "When the mead ' is calm, Vso that nothing more is heard in the cask, close the " bung. Allow 30 days for the mead to clear, then draw off into bottles, cork well, and pack in sand. It will effervesce in a few days rather strongly. • This is the honey mead of the ancient Germans, who attributed health and great age-to its use. It is a de lightfully cool ,and refreshing beverage. Wax Moths.—Apiarist (jiuroa).—Tne comb in bee hives is the natural...

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LIFE IN KOREA JAPANESE INTENSELY HATED PEACEFUL PEOPLE OPPRESSED [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

JAPANESE INTENSELY HATED PEACEFUL PEOPLE OPPRESSED "Throughout Korea the Japanese are cordially hated by the natives, and are also disliked by the Europeans," said a well-known mining engineer, who has spent some years in Japan and Korea, and is now on a visit to Australia. "Some of- the unfortunate Koreans cross over to Siberia so as to escape from Japanese oppression, but the of ficials there, being so far from the St. Petersburg headquarters, never miss an opportunity of blackmailing" the Koreans, many of whom say that there is little to choose between Jap anese and Russian rule." Questioned regarding the trials, on charges of conspiracy, of 123 Chris tian Korean^, which provoked so much attention and so many protests in different parts of the world, the visitor said that an explanation of this affair which is freely offered in Korea, is that the charges were trumped up solely for political purposes. The Jap anese Minister for War was anxious to establish an army division in Kore...

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CABLE BUDGET Imperial Affairs SOUTH AFRICAN STRIKE OVER. [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

Imperial Affairs SOUTH AFRICAN STRIKE OVER. Complete calm prevails throughout South Africa, and the strikers every where have gone back to work. On the strike committee's recom mendation the railway men resumed work. All were re-employed uncon ditionally, with the exception of the strike leaders, including the local sec retary of the railway men's unions. Messrs Boydell and Kentridge, offi cials of the Natal Engineers' Union, were arrested for circularising mem bers and threatening; that they would be posted as undesirables unless they struck. Resistance of the railway men in South Africa has practically collapsed, and it is expected that the whole of the services will be resumed in a day or two. The citizen force is being demobil ised, except those who have not yet undergone their annual training. Col ored strikers, at a meeting, paased a motion in favor of joining the white men's union, having failed to form one of their own. The Johannesburg correspondent of "The Times" says that...

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PEERYBINCLE PAPERS [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

My friend, The Journalist, was really angry at the beginning of the week. It was a cable message published in the press that roused his ire. The mes sage was dated from Madrid, and it told of how King Alfonso of Spain, while in conversation with several pressmen, had made some more or less facetious remarks. The King intends to con struct workmen's cottages on certain of the Royal estates. He predicted that if he continued building such cottages at his own expense he would eventually have everything "up the spout," and would find himself in gaol. He ex pressed the hope that the tribunals would discover a means of pardoning him, as he would never be able to sign his . own pardon. "My objection to Alfonso," said The Journalist, when commenting upon this cable message, is that he is a non-union humorist. He manufactures jests for which he receives no payment, and the said jests are cabled round the world and allowed to compete with the pro ducts of unionist joke-makers, like Harry Laud...

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CALENDAR FOR THE WEEK. JANUARY. [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

CALENDAR FOR THE WEEK. I I JANUARY. The following calendar, showing times nf rising and setting of the sun and moon for the seven days ending January 30 193.4 (Mel bourne Standard Time), is supplied hv thl courtesy of the Victorian Government aT tronomer. Mr P. Baracchi:— 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Saturday Sunday . , Monday . Tuesday . Wednesday Thursday . Friday . . New Moon 7 41 7 40 7 40 7 39 7 38 7 37 7 37 January 26, Rises Pe!iL 2 57 6 1G 4 0 7 3 5 5 7 41 G 8 8 14 7 9 8 41 8 8 9 6 9 4 9 30

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
To Avoid Imprisonment [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

To Avoid Imprisonment j Mr. W. A. Callaway, Deputy Irw, j spector-General of Penal Establish-; ments and Gaols, has suggested a re-: form in the administration of the law. He recommends that for certain offences, in the punishment for which, fines or imprisonment are alternatives, a compromise should he permitted, so that if an offender is not in. a posi tion to pay the whole amount of the fine, but can pay a part of it, that part should be accepted, and the term of imprisonment diminished accord ingly. That is to say, that if he could pay half the fine, that should be ac cepted, and the period of imprison ment cut down by half. It is simple, j equitable, and has been successfully, ,adopted elsewhere. As things. are, ' now, the offender must either pay th© I whole amount or serve the whole term, which is unnecessarily harsh and certainly not economical. Th© fact that the law provides for a fine at-once concedes the principle that a fine is sufficient punishment for a given offence, ...

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Passing of the British Ship [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

Passing- of the British Ship Time seems to have pronounced the doom of the sailing ship so far as the British mercantile marine is concerned, and a local indication of this lies in the fact that two weeks ago out of ten oversea ships in port only one was British. In spite of what Kippling's engineer .said to the young man who considered that the romance of the sea went out when steam came in, a certain air of romance has gone with the sailing ship. It is identified with so much of our history, imperial and local, it is in itself such a thing of beauty and ma jesty, and so much has been written about it (by the authors more particu larly of our youth) that it has begot ten a history of its own. It is still such a picturesque object in our ports, so suggestive of adventure and so full of memories that one cannot but re gret that "Ichabod" has been written, over it, that it has not only largely passed from British hands, but must shrink and retreat still further before the imperious ri...

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Fashion and Local Industry [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

Fashion and Local Industry Fashion came in with Eve, and has kept wives good-tempered and hus bands philosophic, to use no stronger term, ever since. Taking it all round, the women gain. Their fashion changes. That of man does not. Judg ing by his dress, a man is never sure whether he is himself or a waiter. He always looks unimpressionable and funereally dull. He has only two colors on which to ring the changes—black and white, and is for the most part at a great disadvantage. He wants all the aid that artifice can give him, and gets little effective assistance. No man wishes to look pretty, and very few contrive to be handsome. Whereas woman starts with a handicap heavily in her favor, and is supplemented by all the graces of color and costume and knows how to use both, much to the gaiety of the nations. A witness be fore the Interstate Commission made pathetic reference to the quickness with which fashion in shoes changed. Last year merchants had been told by trade journals that ...

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Faults of a Young Country [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

Faults of a Young Country Australia lor the Australians is one of those sentiments which are well meant, but which are not entirely prac ticable. She is only, if modesty of statement is to be consulted, in her ado lescence. The country is not yet ef fectually populated, and a measure of outside aid is still necessary on occa sion. Mr Carmichael, Minister for Education in New South Wales, is of opinion that in spite of improved means of transport, there is a great danger of Australia remaining in the backwash of civilisation, unless men who lead the destinies of the country keep them selves abreast of what is being- done in Europe and America. To import men to All positions in the Public Service or elsewhere is not a good policy in itself, provided the Australian sets himself out to make himself competent for a specified position. There is a great danger of his not doing this — at any rate, consistently. The Australian character has many excellent features, but there is an underlying...

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Wages Dost in Strikes [Newspaper Article] — Weekly Times — 24 January 1914

Wages Dost in Strikes In the nature of things there is now no reason for strikes, for constitutional methods have been established, every man has a vote, and labor is, for the most part, in the majority. That dis poses of the whole situation. To strike is only a kind of economic suicide, and is, in the vast majority of cases, against the worker, a depletion of the trades union funds, and a direct and indirect loss to the class which does the strik ing*. There is a kind of chai<m, no doubt, in feeling one is gambling with one's destiny; and it is one of the fatal predilections of human nature to do it. But it is economically unsound. Statistics drawn up by the Board of Trade in Great Britain show that for the last ten years and in ten trades there has been a loss of £17,413,188 in wages and a net immediate gain of £2,714,340. On the other hand, by ac credited methods the workers have gained £15,000,000. It is a ridiculous error to suppose that wages can be in creased on .d...

Publication Title: Weekly Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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