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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

The Indian Advocate. 145 r THE INDIAN ADVOCATE A """""1 "J - I".N.Ul.UI(V ..- V. ; wt :: :: SACRED HEART MISSION. OKLAHOMA j i A Monthly Review Under tlie Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by our Regular Superiors. OMSKMH OP SUnSCHIPTIONl Single Copies 15c. Annual Si. 00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign Si. 25. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart. Oklahoma. PIHVILBOKSl 1. E cry Subscriber and Benefai tor will participate "n all the merits, prajers and good w irks of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbej. 2. A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered eerv First Saturday of the month for our departed Friend's, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Eery year, in the month of September, two Solemn Masses arc sung for our Bene factors, one for the Living and one for ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

?' fcj 146 The Indian Advocate. The best sort of revenge is not to be like him who did the injury. Ardent spirits have drowned more people than all the waters of the world. - Education begins the gentleman, but reading, good com pany and reflection must finish him. A firm determination to act right will steer even inexpe rience safely over dangerous passages. , Those who are talentless themselves are the first to talk about the conceit of others; for mediocrity bears but one flower envy. Punctuality is one of the characteristics of politeness. He who does not keep his appointments promptly is unfit for the society of gentlemen, and will soon find himself shut out from it. It behooves us to watch against and suppress the first no tions of spiritual pride, such as proneness to think too highly of ourselves, or a desire to have others think highly of us on account of our position or pretended attainments. - The growlers in this world are generally the ones who have given the world occa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

The Indian Advocate. 147 Prejudice may be considered as a continual false medium of viewing things; for prejudiced persons not only never speak well, but also never think well of those whom they dis like, and the whole character and conduct is considered with an eye to that particular thing which offends them. At the present time 25 Indian boarding schools are being supported by the Catholic Indian Bureau. Of these schools, 3 are located in California, 1 in Idaho, 2 in Michigan, 2 in Minnesota, 5 in Montana, 1 in New Mexico, 1 in North Da kota, 2 in Oklahoma, 1 in Oregon, 2 in South Dakota, 1 in Washington, 3 in Wisconsin and 1 in Wyoming. According to reports for the quarter ending December 31, 1901, the ca pacity of these schools was 3,433, the enrollment 2,144, and the average attendance 1,998. Just suppose that Franklin, in the early days when we were struggling for our independence, had met at the court of France the chilly reception given the Boer representatives at Washington...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

148 The Indian Advocate. Since we are grass and like a brief day of years at best, what is the use of so much anxious care, of so much fussing and fretting? What is the good of hoarding money for other people to ruin themselves with when you are dead? What is the good of hating your neighbor? What is the sense of try ing to act a part of seeming to be other than we are? What is the gain of guile, or envy, or evil speaking? What? I should like to know. For, since you are grass and shall soon lie down in the grave, God knows you, and I do not want our dreams in that sleep of death to be of hate or malice or evil speaking. Then be swift to forgive. There is in the countries of the East a species of black ants that suddenly attack articles of furniture. Their work is insidious and unseen. Externally, all seems right, until suddenly the whole thing collapses in a cloud of dust. So it is where discord and harshness exist in domestic or commu nity life. It will eat out the very life of hom...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

The Indian Advocate. 149 season, guide into the path of virtue of which Mary is the perfect flower. She of whom Longfellow was moved to say: "And if our faith had given us nothing more Than this example of all womanhood, So mild, so merciful, so strong, so good; So patient, peaceful, loyal, loving, pure, This were enough to prove it higher and truer Than all the creeds the world had known before." The Society for the Propagation of the Faith has just com pleted and published the statistics of martyrdom among the Catholic missionaries of the world for the year 1901. Nothing could be more interesting reading than the account of how these brave soldiers of the Cross met their deaths while fight ing for the "Faith and for the salvation of their brethren in distant lands. The list includes 171 missionaries, of whom nine were Bishops. Of the latter, four were French, three Italians (who were barbarously put to death by the Chinese), one Canadian and one Dutch (Mgr. Hamer, who was burned a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

150 The Indian Advocate. I y I Origin of the Devotion to Mary j j IN THE CATHOLIC CHURCH j 1. In God's Church, devotion to Mary flourishes everywhere, grand, glorious and rich in Heaven's blessings. Among true Catholics the festivals of Mary and the month of May are days of happiness and joy. The grandest temples rear aloft their majestic proportions in her honor. The enemies of Mary and her devotion declare that these practices' are but the unwholesome fruit of an unsound and enthusiastic piety, belonging to the dark ages, and that by means of this idolatrous worship, and by other senseless practices as reprehensible as this, idolatrous worship of crea tures, evangelical truth, and the Church of Christ itself, which up to that time had been kept pure and unchanged, became hidden and was finally lost under the tattered garment of error. Such is the assertion which they make; on them rests the impossible task of proving it. To us, it is an easy and pleasant task to refute this false ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

Tiirc Indian Advocate. 151 and was the witness of her holy life. Mary was honored by the archangel Gabriel, who honored her with a salutation from high Heaven and addressed her with the honorable titles of "full of grace" and "Mother of God." Mary was honored by her cousin Elizabeth as "the Mother of the Lord." Mary was honored by the forerunner of Christ, St. John the Bap tist, who leaped in his mother's womb at the presence of the Mother of God. Mary was honored by the holy Apostles, whose life and soul and center she was in the room at Jerusa lem, when they were awaiting the coming of the Holy Ghost. Yes, this humble maiden of Nazareth herself, when filled with the Holy Ghost and enlightened by His wisdom, gave of her self the most genuine testimony that till the end of time she was to be the object of the "special praise and the blessings of generations. This truth she declared solemnly when hearing the familiar words in the inspired canticle of the Magnificat : "Behold, from he...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

152 The Indian Advocate. Church. Within the sacred precincts of the Benedictine chan tries might be heard at all hours of the day and night the sounds of praise to God and His blessed Mother. It was in this Order, too, that the cycle of the Church festivals took its rise and assumed its present beautiful and regular form. The feasts of the Blessed Virgin were ever solemnized with strict punctuality, much tender devotion and very careful and elaborate ceremony. A very ancient and reliable tradition avers that in every church of that Order, although the church itself might not be specially dedicated to the Blessed Virgin, the first altar next to the main altar was invariably conse crated to her. Some of the most sumptuous cathedrals that were dedicated to Mary were erected by the members of the Benedictine Order. The same Fathers, century after cen tury, maintained and served many places of pilgrimage where the Mother of God was pleased to obtain countless blessings of soul and body f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

The Indian Advocate. 153 ' ""! 1 1 1 I Our Indian Wards. ? ? ? Mf 1? ii t W W W In an address before the Newman Club, something over a year ago, Charles F. Lummis, the brainy editor of Out IFest, said: "I have not known any of the girls that have gone wrong in the Indian towns to have come from a Catholic school. Not one! But I have known a good manv from Carlisle and other government schools." In the same strain is the following from a recent issue of the Albuquerque Daily Citizen: "Charges are being made in Congress that the Indian schools in this country are hotbeds of immorality. The charge, of course, is denied by Indian agents and the Indian department, but nevertheless the charge is quite true. It may not be that the officials in charge of the Indian schools are immoral, but the manner in which the Indians are turned out of the institutions place them on the high road to an immoral end. The Kingman (Ariz.) Miner says it can give many illustrations of this fact, and says sever...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

154 The Indian Advocate. ernment schools. Better by far leave them in their original condition than elevate them for a time only in the long run to drop them down to greater depths of degradation. Religious Orders. Religious orders might be aptly compared to a well-disciplined army under the command of a general, who in his turn owes obedience to a commander-in-chief. There are several such armies in the Catholic Church. United in essentials, they have their own peculiar mode of warfare in the great and endless fight for the glory of God and the salvation of souls. Soldiers of every' nation, they are strongly united, and ever unto death ready to obey him to whom they have sworn alle giance for God's sake. 'Tis true, a few deserters may appear on rare occasions, but recruits are never wanting. As one after another goes before the Lord of Armies to receive an imperishable badge of glory, the deserted ranks are speedily filled with valiant volunteers. The individuality of each com bata...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

The Indian Advocate. 155 f I T8 1 fc A ? Our Lady of Guadalupe :: UTS The province of Estremadura, in the Kingdom of Spain, is one of the prettiest in the world. In its bosom, nestling be tween high rocks, rises a temple, one of the most revered na- tional santuaries in the land the Church of our Lady of jj Guadalupe, which means "clear water." For all around 1 rippling rivulets flow in the shadow of the towering trees, and at the holy shrine many have already found a healing balm for body and soui. The statue is of very great age, for it was presented by Pope Gregory in the year 595 to St. Leander of Sevilla. Ever since this sanctuary has been a shrine of de vout pilgrimage. No wonder that the adventurous conquis tadores who followed Hernando Cortez to Mexico felt the sting of homesickness when in the far off land of Anahuac they thought of Estremadura, its holy shrine and its spark ling waters. And the heart of the Holy Mother could not forget the knightly sons who carried her ban...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

156 The Indian Advocate. that dreadful place, which every one feared to cross, the In dian at once heard the sound of heavenly music. Scared and perplexed, he looked about to discover the source of the sweet-melodies-when he saw a bright cloud encircled by a ray of burning gold, and in the center a lady clad in, the costly garb oft an Indian princess with a crown on her head. The poor man fell prostrate and did .homage to her as it was cus tomary to do to a native queen. The Holy Virgin, for it was she, advised him to go and tell the Bishop, that she wanted a church to be erected at the place of the apparition. Diego at once hurried to the episcopal palace, and, after many tribu lations, was granted an audience by his lordship, Don Fran cesco Juan de Zumarraga, of the Order of St. Francis. But the Bishop did not put much confidence in his words and dis missed him. He could not believe that the Holy Virgin would entrust such an humble man with such an important message. , u ; The nex...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

The Indian Advocate. 157 lupe on the top of the hill of Tepeyakek, near the City of Mexico. In the year 1756 the National Council of Mexico pro claimed the day of the apparition of our Lady of Guadalupe, December 12th, a national holiday. As such it is celebrated ever since. "Honor Thy Father and Thy Mother," There is a touching story of the famous Dr. Samuel John son, which has had influence on many a boy who has heard it. Samuel's father, Michael Johnson, was a poor bookseller in Litchfield, England. On market days he used to carry a package of books to the village of Uttoxeter and sell them from a stall in the market-place. One day the bookseller was. sick, and asked the son to go and sell the books in his place. Samuel, from a silly pride, refused to obey. Fifty years after ward Johnson became the celebrated author, the compiler of the "English Dictionary," and one of the most distinguished scholars in England; but he never forgot his act of unkind ness to his poor, hard-toiling...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

158 The Indian Advocate. Dr. John Todd, of Pittsfield, the eminent writer, never could forget how, when his old father was very sick and sent him away for medicine, he (a little lad) had been unwilling to go, and made up a lie that "the druggist had not got any such medicine." The old man, who was just dying when little Johnny came in, said to him: "My boy, your father suffers great pain for want of that medicine." Johnny started in great distress for the medicine, but it was too late. The father, on his return, was almost gone. He could only say to the weep ing boy: "Love me and always speak the truth, for the eye of God is always upon you. Kiss me once more and farewell." Through all his after life Dr. Todd often had a heartache over that act of falsehood and disobedience to his dying father. It takes more than a shower to wash away the memory of such sins. Dr. Todd repented of that sin a thousand times. The words "Honor thy father and thy mother" mean four things always do what t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

The Indian- Advocate. 159 LOCALS The foundations of our addition to the Monastery are actively pro gressing. Rev. Fr. Gratian, O. S. B., of Weatherford, Tex., paid us a flying visit on the 7th of April. The bovs of our Indian school are enthusiastic base ball players, while their yelling would make a veteran "rooter" of the bleaching boards turn green with envy. , . The Chickasha (I. T.) Telegram says that there are five more rail roads looking in that direction. What a change! Fifteen years ago the writer of this column passed through a prairie there which now has become' a thriving town. Good luck to her! Mrs. Elizabeth Brown, wife of Gov. Brown, of the Seminole Nation, died recently. Mrs. Brown was an estimable and hospitable lady. She was educated, if memory serves us right, at Fort Smith, Ark. She always spoke highly of the good sisters. . Peace to her ashes. Easter was celebrated with all solemnity possible at Sacred Heart. It is true that we have not the spacious church of yo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

i6o The Indian Advocate. At the present writing it looks as if work will soon begin on the Sante Fe extension at Shawnee, as the contractors are now at that point. The outlook for a bountiful crop throughout Oklahoma this year is at' present encouraging, while a good fruit yield seems almost an assured fact. All the main business portion of Francis, I. T., was destroyed by fire recently. The landlord of the hotel, and also a traveling salesman, lost their lives. According to the Railway Age, the total number of miles of railroad constructed in the United States during 1902 was 5,222, Texas being in the lead with 589.60 miles and Oklahoma second with 427.86 miles. By the time this publication reaches our readers the Choctaw Rail-' road to Asher will no doubt be an accomplished fact, as seventeen cars of steel rails have reached Romulus, and more is on the way. The people of Asher are elated, and are talking of serenading the first train. We are in receipt of the Red Fork (I. T.) Derr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

'' IX Vol. XIV. k The Indian Advocate JUNE, 1902. No. 6 THE SACRED HEART, Heart, of "meek of heart" the meekest; Ever gentlest to the weakest; Heart, like our own hearts, so human; Truly born of mortal woman. Heart of God, the Uncreated! Godhead's ardors unabated Pulsing through these veins of thine; Heart most Sacred, Heart divine! Sweet Redeemer! Bethlehem's story, Calvary's shame and Tabor's glory One same mystery profound In thy Sacred Heart is found. Therefore, now, in glad rotation, Tune we hymns of adoration; Hymns of praise and jubilation; Setting forth thy Incarnation. Heart most tender, Heart most lowly, Source of all things true and holy! Heart of Godhead, three in one! Heart of Jesus, Mary's Son! Eliza Allen Harr.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

1 62 The Indian Advocate. J? t? j j fr f t 1 IMHIIH The Choctaws, - tfc ii s tt tt j u P to date the civilized world is without a history of this ancient people. Indeed, so little is known of their habits, customs and methods of govern ment that the brief, imperfect sketch, such as we are forced to confine ourselves to, will be a mat ter of no small interest to many who are totally ignorant upon the subject. However, be it un- r ate m ucisiuuu wtii we uu input: i ui wis wuin. wciivca JsSm a pretense ot historic research beyond the limi tation of such knowledge as he was enabled to gain from contact with the oldest and most intelligent mem bers of the tribe. Such knowledge, however, is very limited, as few who are now living can detail any events prior to the treaty of 1830. During the presidency of Mr. Jackson we find the Choc taws occupying a considerable tract of country in Mississippi, and living under the government of a king who usually in herited the royal office. Prior to the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

The Indian Advocate. 163 the law and punishable until 1836, when the act was happily repealed. Of the above-named clans that of the Hyah-pah-tuk-kalo was predominant, its people being the most power ful and enlightened in the arts of war and peace. The royal house, or the house of kings, was of the Hyah-pah-tuk-kalo. It was called the "Hattak-i-hollatah" (Beloved of the Peo ple), and no Choctaw, save of the royal blood, was permit ted to sit upon the throne. Of this house was Moshola-tub-by, son of the last king and grand uncle to David and Israel Folsom, whose children are well and widely known in the Choctaw Nation at present. The extreme in every respect of the Hyah-pah-tuk-kalos were the Okalla-hun-nah-lays, or Six Town, who were of a lower caste, a people without the ambition or education which marked the royal "iksa." Of them it is avowed that they often made use of carrion or the carcasses of dead fish and animals. This was, of course, in an early day, before relig ion and ed...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1902

164 The Indian Advocate. residing in southeastern Texas. The ruins of their houses, which were built chiefly of rock, may be seen at the present day on the borders of the creek which bears their name. Like other aboriginal races, the Choctaws believed in the Great Spirit before advent of the early missionaries. But in stead of obstinately setting their faces against the truth, as the majority of the tribes have done, these people, with characteristic eagerness for knowledge, flocked together to listen to the word of God from the lips of Kingsberry, Bying ton and other disseminators of Christian doctrine. While the Choctaws embraced Christianity with apparent readiness, yet they by no means considered themselves under obligation to forsake their ancient rites, customs and superstitions, and it was not until 1834 or thereabouts, when stringent laws were enacted, that they forsook the horrible practice of burn ing to death or otherwise torturing and killing persons ac cused of witchcra...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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