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Title: Day Book, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 66,432 items from Day Book, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

mmmmmmmmmmm wjols pull Info long light strips with tips of fingers. Lay on-waxed paper to harden. Chocolate Creams .Beat th'e white' of an egg light with a tea-, spoon- of sugar, add a teaspoon of vanilla and enough confectioners' sugar to malce a mixture "stiff enough to be formed Beat very - smooth", fof m into' little balls," an'd" spread in pan to cool. Cover chocolate coating. This- is simply melted sweetened chocolate.JEach' ball is dipped in this chocolate until covered, using any sharp in strument to thojd .creams while dipping. FIRST AID TO CHILD VICTIMS OF CHRISTMAS JOYS a:, The greatest evilto children in the holiday season is the.pro longed excitement culminating in the intense strain of the festivi ties. Only a strong, vigorous child can stand it. Many a child, with unstable nervous equilibrium, is actually made sick by the sjrain alone. The utter nerve exhaustion which 'follows is often not due to physical exhaustion or dietetic indiscre-, tions, but to the overstimula...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

wmmmmmmmm . ' ' THEOY.WHOM SANTA CAN'T FIND - ;- .. , Santa js;gpd;tofthe millionaire kid,' -'; 'I, -z ' ' Finds" cout :hisistocking.wKere eYerLtlieylfhid : Fills themlwitKjBirguns''and-gld- palnted, sleds, .r '. ".' Horses tha'f-rqjck; wih-glass-eyes in their heads.' "T Wagons end engines and first basemeriVgloves,, Every old thing that every boy loves. All's fine and"dandy," barring one hitch r ' Boys do not get-them unlessthey arerich.v Though I've "been good" as any boy's been,, ' " ', Santa behaves like I wasjnot'in,' Sometimes I hearihe crack of "his whip- ' - - : vhen hegoes'.-byon his-Christ- ' r mas eve-trip, So he can't say I'm not in his , track, , Waiting for only a mite from his t pack. Shucks . it's no use. The pres ets all switch Elsewhere, instead, to a boy .who is rich. i - 'Cept for the story books fall of such dope Maybe I'd never 'a' had any hope, Prnaps I'd "-never expected a share, Forcing a "smile if my stocking staye"d,bare, While all around me "the luckier o...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

STORY ABOUT MOTHER'S CHRISTMAS PRESENT -. I NJ - C' vWh'en old Santa Claus reached a certain chimney, he was very tired 3hd somewhat cross 'He was1 a. bit late, too, .for there 'seemed to be more good boysand girls on his list than ever before. But he wouldn't miss this chim ney for all the world He had been coming to it regularly fdr fdur years, and each time went away a bit warmenrheafted and jollier, with that' punning twin kle in his eye abit brighter. - First year he'd left a rattle ahd a .small wool hood. Next time it -was a Teddy Bear and a cute-little spoon all bent arounJi a-the C. x. handle: Then is. was-a big pic ture book and a watm jacket and real outdoor shoes. Last year,1 sewing box and a great. doll that would shut her eyes and say "Ma-a-a" pretty plainly. This year he - had bought a very, very, large lot of very many different things, because his little child-friend had always been very good, very loving, very sweet to everyone, and he-had conie to IoVq her very muc...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

fThe little bed was "where it al ways was, but there were'no tiny shoes beside it and no little skirt, shirt and underclothes with long tape garters hung on its post. .What could it mean? Santa crept nearer. The bedwas empty. On the pillow, folded and bound with, blue ribbons, were a small dress, the wool hood and the wee shoes beside them, with Teddy Bear ly ing prone on his face, quite life less likev Into every corner, behind every piece of furniture'old Santa peer ed, but his little friend was not there. Then Santa slyly peeped through a door that was slightly ajar. Before the dying grate fire sat a man. Flashes from the sputter ing coals now and then lit up his face so you could read it. He was seeing things in "the changing shapes of the fire, living over again .things that were past? and that could never come again, hun gering for shouts and hughter and songs that were gone forever. And kneeling at this man's feet, her arms and head on his knees, herlips pressed to a little f...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

mmmmmmmmmmwmmmmmmmmmmwm THE DAILY SHORT STORY The Kiss. Annette was sulking. I was something I had done or some thing Ihad not done who in thunder can -tell aboufa woman ? and I was penitent as' any Mecca-bound Moslem. She sat stiff and straighten the half-gloom of the crowded wagonette, and would not even talk of the weather. For my part, I whistled the Viennese waltz she had al ways loved, in the hope of making her sigh. Then I whistled the "Saffron Sue" air which she 'de tested, in the hope of rriaking her rage. But Annette sal stiff and straight and cold like the statue of Juho in the art gallery. I stood that kind-of thing as long as any man who is not a Shoshone Indian or a Grecian archeology professor could stand it; then I reached for Annette's little, pinkish hand. She moyed it slightly, slowly backward. I followed up the beautiful member arid- pressed three fingers close in my big, rough palm. There was no answering pressure, but An 'nette did not withdraw her hand, and sh...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

mfmmmmmmmwmmmmmmmmmmmm - "L prefer that you wait until we get home," she objected. "We can light -the gas and you can see what you are doing." "The gas light would kill the romance," I declared." "Make ready now." Annette sighed submissively and I could see that she tilted her pretty face. I leaned forward and pressed my lips to hers. The evasive perfume of her hair filled my nostrils; her long, black eye lashes tickled my cheek. I shut my eyes and saw a wonderful tropical forest where rainbow plumed birds sang golden mel ody and lazy -rivers glided to the sea. A noise of harps struck up and white-clad angels chanted overhead. The world was a shirn mer of gold and purple. The driver turned and asked me if I ever caught a tarpon. I did not answer, for the planets were grinding heavenly harmony. An nette caught her breath ecstat ically and I held on. A troop of noble knights swung jauntily in to -the wondrous forest, r A pale, silvery light seemed to burst from somewhere, wrapping An ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

. t .. - ' " CHRISTMAS, OR YULETIDE ' -SI . To the Children bless their fresh little hearts! Christmas is almost the Christmas of old. To therii it is the festival of love in i " - m' ijB',3iPjS .?" .-7i-Ji-.r:i ri -i si Cl-jt JV-ss.rr lit Trri.dei;a -;;t.--,-;... .i ,g ubbtyfr.; -La.M y7Tgy ' . : , " j iwhich they come into their birth- Iright more fully than at other jseasons. liong may its tide -rise for them! ' . But for Us oldsters, what haf hap- Ipened to the Christmas of auld iiarig syne? Who cares now about Ithe Christmas carol? We came in to Christmas fellowship in child- lood, "trailing clouds of glory, see tnings in gray, ana waitc through the Christmas-tide dance of revelry like people who have for gotten the figure, and no longer care to dance. 1 To many of us, Christmas is the season when we are conscious of falling below certain standards, themselves vague and undefined. Our consciences are guilty, and we know not why. 'Let us acknow ledge this and keep the faith with...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

VWIPVWW wmmmmmmmmmmmm blessed the marriage feast took the field in Christmas against the foul Druid of the dark and bloody groves. But was Yule-Tide then utterly vanquished? Ah, no! Yule Tide ever fights against Christmas, as frost with fire, as darkness with light, as love with cruelty. It is Yule-Tide with the shop-girl and the mail carrier, w.tih the expressman and the motorman Yule-Tide for thousands not Christmas. Still of dark significance is the parasitic mistletie, and the red beams of the holly radiate as we)l as stored sunlight. Are we guilty in our inner conscience because we are no longer simply kind? Are we unquiet in this greatest of all festivals be cause it is no longer dedicated simply and unstudiedly to love? Perhaps we can restore Christmas to what it was, and more, by helping in the long, long battle of Christmas against Yule-Tide. Let us try!"1. kV THE BABE THAT WAS BORN IN BETHLEHEM (PA.) l By O. P. Newman. c Bethlehem, Pa., Dec. 25, 1911. This babe in the crad...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

W : "aLraftSfiySSBBSMK7 1 .Cold" December day. He has to work from 6 o'clock'in the morn ing until 6 at night,and the boss for whom he works doesn't like to haye his men take a day off just to welcome a bit of ababy not i the father is a 14 cents .a day man. Indeed, he didn't allow the baby's father to stay at home yes terday, although most - babies' 'fathers can stay at home on Sun day; and 'he can't stay at home ,today Christmas - day because the big mills keep righp on mak ing hard, tough, soulless steel day and night, Sunday and Christmas day, and 'every other day.- If the baby's father would re fuse to work every day, why, they .would gel somebody else who would, and then what would be come of this little babe of Bethle hem, Pa.? The babyjs mother that's her picture, right by the .baby's, cradle is a young-woman. You wouldn't think sen by looking at the picture, arid you would think it'fess if you yourself saw Mrs. Dimmick.- It isn't years 'that vmake the baby's mother so old l...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

worry she has experienced trying to keep bodies and souls together former children, her husband and herself, on the 14 cents an hour which the rich steel company pays 3,000 workmen in the John Dimmick class; 2,500 workmen a little more skilled than John Dimmick get 16 cents an hour. That is, they get that pay when they work, because no steel com pany in its senses pays any man during the many weeks the milbs are Shut down. Undoubtedly it made Mrs. Dimmick's lot the harder when the father came home from his 12 hours work before the red-hot furnace so tired he couldn't help her at all; so worn out that he can't smile at this tiny tot in the cradle. It wasn't very long before this' babe of Bethlehem, Pa., came that John and his fellow workers asked the giant sted'company to pay them a few cents more an hour and to Stop much of the Sunday work, so that" the men could go to church, or stay.home resting with their families. The company refused. They said that this baby's father needn't wo...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 26 December 1911

.- THE DAY BOOK 500 SO..PEORIA ST. " c398 TEL. MONROE 353 Vol I, No. 77 Chicago, Tuesday, D.ec. 26, 1911 One Cent SOME LIGHT ON THE TRACTION SITUATION Hpw Public Business is Ttansacted i by Council When Private -Interest Is Involved The Public Interest WouldBe. Protectedyby a Referendum Vote on All -Franchise Ordinances. ' When thieves fell out, honest folks usually get some unexpected 'information. '.., , Many a citizen of Chicago has worked overtime unsuccessfully trying to figure out the" various angles of Chicago's peculiar trac tion situation.. . At',the regular meeting of- the city council, .Monday, Dec. 18, 'Aid! Mclnerney gavehis audience a bit, of unwritten traction history: - " " " " t . He practically charged the former whip of the city council, Milton Y. Foreman,' ex-alderman of the Third ward, with having received a "fee of $265,000 to force through the council the Consol "idafe'd'Tracton ordinance, whereby the city of' Chicago paid to that company $4,000,000 for a, lot...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 26 December 1911

scheme of the company to use the streets of Chicago for the pur - pose of transporting express. It appears that the traction companies are opposed to the 5-cent fare and insisted on including this express carrying provision in the ordinance with the purpose of creating a division in the council so that the ordinance might bfe delayed. , This situation is the outgrowth, of the ordinance of 19074 whereby the city can only deal with the traction companies by agree ments. The city of Chicago is placed-at the mercy of the traction company. This was the interpretation given to the provisions of the or dinance of Aid. Emerson, of the Seventh ward, and others who op posed the freight carrying provision. "If the Chicago City Railways Company had the interests of the common people at heart," said the alderman, "It would have "given the people a 5-cent fare years ago. The Chicago Railways Company is seeking a right-of-way for freight carrying purposes and is misrepresenting things to the peopl...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 26 December 1911

.had to go to the people direct for such concessions as they might vant, it couldn't be kept quiet.- Publicity would be -necessary in order to reach all the people, and the gum shoe game wouldn't work. Manufacturing public opinion through a subsidized press would be a bigger job than it is today, when the people only get as much of the truth as a kept press feels it is safe to let dribble through. Any honest enterprise, any square institution, any fair-minded man, can safely trust the people and needs not fear a thorough in vestigation. It is only the sha'dy game and the tricky individual that prefer darkness to the light of .truth. No honest enterprise which means "a partnership arrangement between the city and" a public-service corporation need fear sub mitting, the matter to a vote of the peo.ple. v A project of such magnitude as a subway system,v involving as it does millions upon millions of taxes,. should be submitted to a vote of the people. This would be a good line for the ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 26 December 1911

ONE OF LIFE'S LITTLE MYSTERIES This is a curious world. If you don't believe- it, ask Skinny Malone. ' -zrz nm " iSa, Skinny Malone, like many an other wiser than he, can't figure it out at all. He knows that the world is wound up to run in such and such a way, and experience has taught him that it is likely to go on running .that way, but for the life of him he can't see why anybody should have made a World to wag on in such a hap hazard fashion. He is not overly self-confident, never yet having had enough to eat in all his seven years, but he has a sneaking idea that he couldIL make a better world than this one himself if he were to have a try. at it. And it is not at all strange that Skinny should" think thus, in view of the way the world looks through Skinnyjs eyes today. For look see what it has done to Skinny. t Yesterday was Christmas. All over Christendom yesterday' folks were getting Christmas presents. For a. whole month people had crowded the down-town stores, buying thou...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 26 December 1911

1 'the wagonload and carload, and everybody else in all the world, so faf, as Skinny knows, getting presents, even down to little Tony the Dago, who got a Jewsharp and not one s'mallest, most trivial present in all the thousands for Skinny Malone! Is it any wonder that the whole matter is a mystery to Skinny, or that he thinks that somebody bungled when this world was set spinning in-space? , CHICAGO DOlNGSBRIEFLY TOLD agove the knees early today by John J. Wilson, former sergeant in U. S. army. Wilson is alleged to have been abusing a number of newsboys, and Connors ap proached to learn the cause of the trouble. Wilson is a watchman? Arthur Johnston, 5626 Ridge ave., motorman for Chicago Rail way Co., crushed between car and sand bin in N. Clark street barn this morning. Four ribs fractured and arms and body bruised. Removed to his home Judge Landis refused to allow bail to Zoe Wilson and her hus band, Charles M. Wilson, alias Willard, convicted, as "white slavers," pending an appe...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 26 December 1911

day. - C. L. McCoy, cashier for.Her- ring-Hall-Marvin Safe Co.. 211 y. Washington street, robbed of $250 and shot while in the office yesterday afternoon. Four persons hurt when auto truck" hit street car at S. 48th ave. and W. Harrison street, Austin, yesterday. John Kock, 1619 Larrabee, held ip,at Estes and N. Clark, and rob bed of clothes and shoes. Went home in a barrel. He had a hat. Harry Newman, 8, 1417 Edge mont ave., struck and seriously injured by motorcycle while on way to Christmas party. Uncon scious 24 hours. Motorcyclist es caped. John Marks, alias William Martin, 106 S. Halsted, arrested on charge of beating Erick John, attempted to hang himself with necktie in cell at Desplaines street station. Failed. The municipal courts were crowded today with visitor suf fering from a hangover Christ mas. Frank Tesmar, 2618 W. 25th street, shot and killed in saloon brawl at 2200,-W. 19th street. Paul Lepek, 2220 W. 19th street, arrested, charged with the mur der. Andrew Carlson,...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 26 December 1911

PACKERS AGAIN ASK "IMMUNITY BATH" AS FIRST" WITNESS TELLS OF POOL OF INTERESTS J ' The first witness took the stand in the trial of the millionaire packers today. He was Albert H. Veeder, in. whose offices the government claims the packers met to' "fix prices," and who is generally be lieved to haye been the brains be hind the beef trust. But Veeder was not permitted to take the stand until the defense had made a last attempt to stop the trial, by dragging into at Federal Judge Humphrey'-s fa mous "immunity bath" decision. Attorney John S. Miller, chief counsel for the defense, -and the original little securer of immun ity "baths, did the dragging: When court convened, Miller rose to object to all evidence of fered by the government concern ing the business of the packers prior to 1905. - Were this objection sustained it would exclude alL the evidence in the hands of the government tending toward proving the mo tive behind the formation of the National Packing company that motive be...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 26 December 1911

ney for J. IDgden Armour. v But it was quite obvious that Veeder had been the moving spirit in the thing, and equally ob vious that the government was "desirous of showing that he had been so. ,The government's questions to Veeder began by a plain attempt to show just how much Veeder knew of the Swift company's concerns, and then how much he knew of the Armour company's concerns. Veeder refused to admit that he knew much of the Armour company's business. "I see what you want me to an swer," he said to Attorney Pierce Butler, St. Paul, who was doing the quizzing for the government, "but I cannot answer as you -wish. I know of those affairs (the af fairs of the Armour -company) only by hearsay just as you do yourself." Butler drew the story of the formation of the pool, that was to absorb the packing industry of the whole country, from Veeder b;t by bit. Veeder denies that J. Ogden Armbur eyer attended meetings at his office of the pool packers. But he admitted a moment-later that Arm...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 26 December 1911

- THE TRUE SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS The spirit which prompt those who have to contribute gener ously that "those who have not may eat a Christmas dinner, is all right as far as it goes but it doesn't go far enough. For those who had not, and thus accepted a Christmas dinner as charity, very likely will 'be as hungry next Monday as they would have been yesterday had the Christmas spirit not reached them. Much more good would be done in the world if those who catch the Christmas spirit in December would hold on to it the re mainder of the year. For then it might prompt them to make closer inquiry into economic conditions that make Christmas charity necessary. When so many have so. much more than they need, and so many more have .less thaa they need, there is something radically wrong in the adjustment of human affairs. And none of us can escape his full share of responsibility for this condition Those who are poor do not enjoy accepting charity they ac cept because (they can't see how they...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 26 December 1911

and for the spirit of Christmas every day; in the year and every Hour In the day. "KEEP YOUR TEMPER," SAYS FEATHERWEIGHT CHAMPION IN ADVICE ON "HOW TO BOX'-' " Editor's note "Keep your temper" is the first advice given by Abe Attell, featherweight champion and the world's great est boxer, in this, his initial les son on "How to Box," written especially for The Day Book. These articles were originally in tended for boysto teach them the needed art of self-defense and give them healthful exercise but they are just as good for t young men and all men, for the same reasons. Pointers in Attell's ad- By Abe AttelL Get control of your temper. This is my first advice to the boys who want to learn to .box, whether for fan, exercise or in a match. I have seen many promising boxers ruined by losing their temper, swinging wildly and gw ing an opponent 'an opening for a punch that stretched them on the floor. Position is important. Stand with the left foot from eight to twenty inches in 'front o...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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