ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
5,371 results
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1906

ers sold their apple crop on the basis of the previous year's prices when they might have received nearly, if not quite, double for their crop. ♦ • ♦ It is too early yet to report accurate ly on this year's crop. In Washington the apple, pear, prune and peach crops are ?ood with* a few exceptions. This may be very nearly said of the entire United States. The outlook is for a large crop. What modifications may occur in the next two or three months I know not, but if any do occur I shall try to inform our readers. Fruit, however, will not get ruinously low. even if we do have a good crop. Times are so good in the whole country that the people can buy freely. Peaches will sell well in the Pacific northwest. Pears will be high for California will be short of a bumper crop on account of the ravages of the blight. Apple? of a high grade can be sent across the continent and to Europe and sold at a good profit. Take good care of your orchards and you will be happy when the crop is sold. * *...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1906

6 Orchard Tillage and Cover Crops (1,. B. Judson. Idaho Kxp. Bta.) Clean culture tor young orchards for several yean after letting is the rale followed, or at leasl believed In, by most growers in the Pacific north west, and it is not likely any better will be fonnd. Nothing promotes the thrift and vigor of young trees WithOUi undue stimulation like thorough til lane, and many find the practice good enough for permanent use. Loosen ilu> ground up thoroughly in the spring and then give a shallow cultivation about once in two weeks, and always after a rain, up to tlu> middle of Aug ust. It is unwise to continue culti vating after that time because late growth is stimulated only to be winter killed. Weeds that come up after August IT.th are easily turned under in the spring and are actually benefic ial as a light . manure. For the first cultivation some tool that will stir the ground to a depth of four or five inches is desirable. Some find the right-lap cutaway disk very effecti...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1906

soon showed signs of distress, drop ping their learei r«ry early, and pro ducing only worthless fruit. The leaves 111 plots 1 and 3 turned yellow and fell nearly two weeks before those in plot 2. The following Spring the wholo was again put under clean cul tivation. Canadian field peas were sown in another part of the orchard in August. 1901. and produced a large amount of vegetable material before winter. They are well adapted for cover cropping here, but the seed is expensive. Clover sown in Angus!, failed to germinate. The station is experimenting this year with rye and cowhorn turnips, to be sown in July, and compared with plots fertilized with bone meal, muri ate of potash, superphosphate, and sulphate of iron. The work is beina done on a considerable scale in a commercial orchard, and we are look ing for valuable results. DEAFNESS CANNOT BE CURED by local applications, as they cannot reach the diseased portion of the ear. There is only one way to cure deafness, and that is by ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1906

s IRRIGATION This department Is open to contribu tion! from any one Interested In irriga tion. Make your articles as brief and COnSiM as possible and be careful to five facts and figures. Exoerfments in Ditch Puddling. At Trrieon. Oregon, there has just been completed a most exhaustive and thorough series of experiments on the value of various materials and meth ods for puddling ditches, with the view of determining the best possible meth od of preventing the loss of water in canals constructed in common soil or sand. To this end numerous pits were constructed by snecial machin ery, all exactly the same size and under exactly the same conditions. The inner surfaces of some were then mixed with certain percentages of TJmatilla river silt; some with a cer tain clay which abounds along the river banks; others with a mixture of these clays and silt and a small per cent, of lime, and others were treated with crude California oil. Various hand methods were emniov ed for treating these adm...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1906

THE DAIRY Forming a Dairy Herd. (Prof. H. E. Alvord.) There is no point of greater import ance in selecting animals for th« foundation of a herd or in making pur chases of additions than to get per fectly healthy stock. Animals chosen should be critically examined and should afford evidence of being strong in constitution and of healthful vigor It is advised that all be tuberculin tested, and this, of course, should be done by a competent veterinarian. Be- Rides the robust character of the mdi viduals the breeding stock from which they are descended and the herd, stables and farms from which they come should be closely examined on the score of health. Breeding and rearing the animals needed to re plenish and increase the herd and re fusing to allow strange animals on the farm are the best safeguards against the introduction of disease. If purchases must be made let the new stock be strictly quarantined for at, least one month beforQ mingling with the herd. On every farm of any size ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1906

10 HOUSEHOLD Contribution! for this department are invited frmn all tlip women readers of Th€ Ranch. Subject! of interest to tlir rural people ar« especially desired. How to Cultivate Peonies. This subject should naturally be of mud) Interesi to the women of the coast for this section is particularly well adapted to their growth. Peonies are among the most common and best herbaceous perennials, being hardy, easily m-own and furnishing a profus ion of beautiful flowers. They are natives of Europe and Asia, only one species, P. Brownii, being found in North America, and this on the Pa cific coast. The peony is seldom at tacked by insect, animal or fungous diseases, and being hardy it needs no covering, except in rare cases. The single flowering sorts are not so popu lar as the double, as they do not keep so long when cut and fade more quick ly than the double on the plant. When a* plant has been set out right and re ceives the proper care and treatment it will often bloom and do well ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1906

POULTRY „ H. I* BLANCH ABD The following list of questions from several subscribers to The Ranch come to us for answers: 1. What Is the lowest temperature eggs can be sub jected to and hatch well? Answer. — To hatch well 50° is as low as we dare have them go. For safety we like to keep them in a temperature of about 55° and turn them daily. 2. Will eggs set the same day as laid hatch? Ans.—Yes, if fertile. 3. What is the best way to mark young chicks in order to know them from others? Ans. —Punch a hole in the web of one of the feet with a mark er made for the purpose, and which can be obtained at almost any poultry house. 4. Are trap nests a patented af fair and can they be bought? Ans. — Some are and some are not. Those that are can be had at the poultry sup ply houses. The Maine experiment station has one that is not; a full description of which can be had by sending to that station for its poultry bulletin No. 79. 5. Are chicks from hens that have scaly legs more liable to be su...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1906

FRUIT OUTLOOK (Continued from Page One.) acreage of fruit is being materially Increased. 9. Fruit growing is one of the lead ing agricultural industries and is be ing developed as a specialty of late years. For the most part it is as an adjunct to the farm, especially the dairy. . 10. I have secured no expressions of opinions on the horticultural law, but have heard it said that it is a good law. but should be improved upon. * * * Cowlitz Co., C. N. Hog-an, Inspr. The approximate acreage of fruit trees and berries in Cowlitz county is about 3000 acres, divided among about. 1500 householders. The acreage is in creasing from year to year slowly, but. increasing about on an average of a hundred acres each year, as consider able interest in fruit growing is de veloping among the farmers, who re alize that they are exempt from the worst of fruit pests, codling moths and Pan Jose scale. Scab is here our worst enemy, but demonstration has proved that spraying with the Bor deaux rnivture is...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1906

NOTICE OF REMOVAL We have moved our Seattle Retail Store and Business Offices from 809 Western Aye. to 926 First Aye. South. We are now in our own building, having shaken off the landlord, and are occupying better and more commodious quarters than ever. The great amount of work entailed in removal has necessited some slight delay in filling orders, but we believe our customers fully realize the circumstances and will bear with us for the short time until our establishment is in smooth running order again. We extend a cordial invitation to our friends and patrons to call and visit us in our new home. Poison Implement Co. 926 First Aye. South Seattle, Wash. acreage will be doubled in two years. Wheat growing is the leading indus try in Klickitat county, after which comes stock raising, and next fruit growing. The leading growers of the county take kindly to the present horticultural law and want it enforced. • • * ■jTakima Co., J. K. Brown, Inspr. Not having checked up the acreage in ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1906

14 LIVE STOCK Stock Business at Portland. With the establishment of an im mense packing plant by the Swifts at Portland, Ore., the interest in the beef cattle industry is sure to pick up very materially from now on. For the Pacific northwest the Portland Union Stock Yards will become the barometer of prices for livestock prod ucts. Conditions at that center one week ago were reported as follows: Receipts have been rather light, with no particular demand, the larger packers having plenty of contract cat tle on hand. From present indica tions there will be a movement ol half-fat cattle to this market for per haps thirty days, on account of gov ernment reserves being closed to so many small stockmen, which will force cattle on the market too soon. This will probably result in a shortage of cattle during summer and fall and prices should hold good. Best steers sell from 4^c to 3%c; lighter and medium steers from 3c to 4c; best cows and heifers, 3^c to 3%c; old and shelly cows and light ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1906

Warranted to Give Smtlmfmotton. Gombault's Caustic Balsam Has Imitators But No Competitors. A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for Curb, Splint Sweeny, Capped Hock, Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind Puffs, and all lameness from Spavin, Ringbone and other bony tumors. Cures all skin diseases or Parasites, Thrush, Diphtheria. Removes all Bunches from Horses or Cattle. As a Human Remedy for Rheumatism, Sprains, Sore Throat, etc.. It ia Invaluable. Every bottle of Caustic Balsam sold Is Warranted to give satisfaction. Price $1,60 per bottle. Sold by druggists, or cent by ex press, charpres paid, with full directions for its use. tSTSend for descriptive circulars, testimonials, etc. Address The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland. 0. dent that they would need certain modifications to assure to stockmen a more equitable use of the range without in the least loosening those essential restrictions on which the very existence of the live-stock in dustry depends. From the first, the main body of the...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1906

16 CUT TO PIECES Ship Your Fruit to Vancouver - —^^^^_____ By Steamers of the Vancouver Line. Sail -, Prices reduced! Capacities in- from Seattle in the evening as per time flpiillipSSri creased! Tubulars cheaper than card in daily papers, and arrive at Van ■l|P|lßl any others now! Look at this: - couver next morning. ssPfi No. 1. 200 lbs. per hour capacity. .$40.00 d+i\£\t A till AIIIPI/ CCm/irC No .2.300 lbs. per hour capacity .55.00 I ||||| A |\| 1 I 111 II 14 \|lli/ll I lin7gf=> No. 3 400 lbs. per hour capacity.. 65.00 \7IIUL /1111/ VEUI\7II ULIlf 11/ L \Un^ajV No. 4. 500 lbs. per hour capacity.. 80.00 fflfflsHlYf^ No. G. 700 lbs. per hour capacity. .100.00 ' liflflLL/W No. 9. 950 lbs. per hour capacity. .125.00 For rate9 ' Gic" See vHK / Don't wait a minute. Send in ; jSI j your order to your nearest Tubu- \JT JP Colman Building lar agent, or direct to us. Tubu- V«»*V«/Vs/ f\ Otr V/Vs/« SEATTLE, WASH. 1 lars sold subject to giving satis- faction and on terms. ~^^^^^^^^^^;^^^...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1906

THE RANCH . Vol. XXIII. No. 11. Soil Moisture and Its Action (By C. A. Crawford.) THE average farmer sows his seed early in spring, sees the fields become beautiful with bright green shoots of grain, and as the sea son advances watches with interest the heading process as it takes place. Then as the grain loses the greeu color and takes on the golden yellow he knows that the time for harvesting has come, and that he is soon to re ceive the reward for his labor. All these things he notes, thinking little of the vast amount of water neces sary to bring his crop to maturity. But let him stop and think that for every pound of dry matter he received it tooK an average of about four hundred and forty-five pounds of water from the soil. The amount of water taken up by different crops varies consid erably. For barley it takes 465 pounds of water to produce one pound of dry matter. For oats 500 pounds, corn 270 pounds, clover 575 pounds and for wheat 450 pounds, respectively, of wa ter to pr...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1906

2 _ I London's — f^ —LT>KrDOW»J I \ LONPOW'J 1 I LQJ4.OONS j I LONPONTS 1 | u|ilT1 Kj>OM'A. qTL*\_A-. TSSf 50 _, lu-rTto*TCs»uPi^.»|eo. unitco mill* Tu*n> co. umitio mills »uwi.» Co I umtto mills bu»i»co. uwrt» mills ium» CO. " ' .I^r3 \ . * TT. tmSi (T^l oiLCLQTHs LACE: tapestry window rnymFS SEATTLE WASH JBSf^M^^uZK^ HLiTui&^v^ rtr«wiiK^ia-»w LINOLEUMS I ! 1 *fiit^A A jTi/mjs'%T^ P I r?c»^^tfj^as^gs^isss^ BBBB| v.T, T« r?«S WE PAY FHEIGHT | YOU SAVE MDHEY | 11^^^^^ tion "'" them an II ■ X -J 11> I I _C* I /"* $i» Kd 1 PlS^llji^^^l UnilCQ IVIIIIS olippij LU. |i|i^ei^pi ffllllllM I'otTm'fec? rf'rom 1111 Second Aye., Seattle, Wash. |ji^^^^a@L; rjkvfLSfeu-RiSS Carpets, Linoleums, Mattings, l^Hiiiii for the kitchen or the dining room No loll—Nottingham Curtain; on the farm. We have a good heavy I /-k^>r«. fl<<r»T^mC white, width 36 inches, length 3 quality in any pattern or color for I_ClCv3 V^UrLCllII^ yards. This is made of good, strong which your dealer char...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1906

Issued First and Fifteenth of Month By The Ranch Publishing Corporation Killer Freeman, Editor and Manag-er. Associate Editors: P. !■. Axling- F. Walden H. L. Blanchard Chicago Representatives: Allen ft Ward, Boyce Building Office: 326-6 Colman Building, Seattle. Subscription: In advance, one year 50 cents; six months, 30 cents. Seattle subscribers are required tp pay $1.00 per year, on account of local postage. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be noti fied in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find it on our list from the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and address, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expiration Is shown on your paper by address label containing your name. Failing to receive the paper regularly, you should notify the Seattle office at once, when mistak...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1906

4 HORTICULTURE F. WALDEN Quite a little inquiry is made con cerning the Cornice pear, and not a few are planting it. What is it, whence comes it and what is its value as a com mercial pear?, are questions that are asked quite frequently. It is well to ask these questions, and especially the last one, before planting the Cornice extensively. That some parties in Cal ifornia have made quite a success with this pear is well known, but this fact alone would not warrant its extensive planting in other parts of the coun try. I have no remembrance of ever having seen this pear, and if anyone in the northwest has grown it, even to a limited extent, I do not know it. If anyone has fruited it in Washing ton, Idaho or Oregon I wish he would report. It is not a new pear, as many suppose, but its propagation in the United States commercially is new. * * * The best answer to the questions asked above that I have seen is given in a recent issue of the Rural New Yorker, one of the best farm papers ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1906

will be spoiled before it can reach the consumer. If peaches are picked too green they will wilt and become flabby and their taste is anything but good. There is great difference in varieties in this respect. The big yel low peaches like the Crawford, El berta, Foster, Chair's Choice, Reeve's Favorite and many others, will hold up much longer than the early peaches like the Alexander and Hale's Early. It is a difficult thing to get the early peaches into market in proper shape. The writer has known Crawforils, Early and Late, to stand for a week after being picked when rjpe and not be seriously injured. On the other hand Alexanders and Early Rivers have been known to spoil in a day. Inasmuch as all peaches do not ripen at the same time the picker must be able from sight to select the ones ready to pick and not to pick the greener ones. Too many beginners will want to pinch the peaches to see if tuey will do to pick. This must not be allowed, for every peach so pinched will soon spoi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1906

6 A COMING IRRIGATION SECTION Lying adjacent to the Columbia river and not far from Wallula, Wash., in one of the richest agricultural regions of the United States, is a territory which promises soon to become one of the greatest fruit, vegetable and hay producing regions in the north west. The future productiveness and value of land in this region is assured by the low altitude and the early sea sons which permit the maturing and ripening of fruit and vegetables before the produce of any other section in the state is ready for marketing, al lowing the grower as a result to de mand better prices and reap larger profits. Like all of the other largest producing sections of the northwest, this one is essentially an Irrigation proposition, and the settlers are as sured of perpetual water rights for their lands by the Columbia Canal Co., which has built one of the best con structed and most modern irrigation canals north of California. The com pany obtains an ample and inexhaust ible sup...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1906

PROCESS FOR CLEARING STUMPAGE Mason A. Fry, of Seattle, has invent ed a process for burning stumps that, on account of the economy and facil ity of the method, promises to revo lutionize the clearing of logged-off lands not only in this state but in every part of the northwest where there is an opportunity for agriculture to follow on the heels of the clearing away of the forests by the lumbermen. The large tracts of fertile land on the west slope of the Pacific, which were once covered by heavy timber growth, but whose soil becomes mos,t produc tive after the stumpage has been cleared away and the land tilled, makes this invention especially valu able, because it is so much more eco nomical than other methods practised heretofore, and places every owner of this kind of land in position to have his tracts cleared away at small ex pense. The primary object of the Fry pro cess is to provide means by which the fire will be carried down into the roots of the stump and, by causing these ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1906

8 THE DAIRY Report on Dairying and Pure Foods. Hon. L. Davies, state dairy and pure food commissioner of Washington, has made a brief report covering the work done by his office during the twelve months previous to Mriy 1, 1906. His work is being carried on under the latest law of the state re lating to dairying and pure food in spection, and he finds this law very beneficial, adding that with sufficient appropriation more educational work among the dairymen could be carried on. The number of assistants allow ed him is too small to cover the state as fully as it should be. but even with the force at his command he says very satisfactory work has been done. Dur ing the period covered by the report there have been inspections made of 489 dairies in the state, 149 creamer ies, six cheese factories, 57 milk de pots and three milk condenseries. Many of the above dairies were found, upon first inspection, to be in very bad condition, and in their cases several inspections were made, until...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
x
Loading...
x
x