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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

June 1996 Young exhibitors arming themselves with facts By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor Like a team preparing for a big game, agriculture club members are arming themselves with knowledge to deal positively with attacks from animal rights activists. A program titled "I Care About My Animals" is sweeping through Virginia's 4-H and Future Farmers of America clubs. It alerts 4-H and FFA leaders and members to possible activities that activists might engage in at youth livestock shows and county fairs. The program also outlines ways of handling questions from activists, reporters and the public, said Martha Moore, an assistant director of public affairs for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. Mrs. Moore speaks to young people about the program. "The '1 Care' program is important because it's a proactive program," Mrs. Moore said. "It's designed to help both livestock exhibitors to understand proper care and use of animals and to prepare them for any types of interruptions or dem...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

Farm Bureau News Farmers reconstructing flood-ravaged bridges Victims still recovering from disaster By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor GRAVES MILL —Almost a year has passed since the flood of '95, and Randall Lillard still cringes when a weather report calls for severe thunderstorms. It's hard for Lillard to push aside memories of June 27, 1995. On that day, 20 inches of rain fell on Madison County. This created a type of flood that seldom occurs, not even in 100 years. "Some people say it was a 500-year flood, and I've even heard it called a 1,000-year flood," Lillard said. His farm was one of the most damaged in Madison County, which sustained $100 million in losses, making it the hardest-hit county in Virginia. Lillard and his family experienced first-hand the tremendous forces of nature. Mudslides, boulders and uprooted trees came roaring down a mountain and crashed into their hillside home. The force pushed their two- Emotionally we'll never completely get over it. The sup...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

June 1996 Flood-stricken counties turning green again iff : - BttHKU fl ■fiMMtr' ir^.s? Jf*t» M Y f I " /\H H ' ikbTJKHia!• v-sbzwWf K ei# BflBv&T i L^fl lW- '^8 ■HV Wj^mEn #1 Sfl ug»» ■■• *''-.»% £;' : 4.' ? ' * -% N M ? % w,'( '- w * -rC ; ,; vj , T "rf , lf^ 4 "'• '^f\ ** " '. *' * i «s[dpfi * ™ I wf V "^■p 7 ' jb . I hp, ww-' j '^^^hhi^Hßß If )% I I M- otRHHHRKk & issJmfT!^F.'. % itr^!-^'^•i■ I £ " / 7^H?Tl^P*r 1 ■•*•• IgfMF' J / ■ - TB . *lfe -«f%;i " '• i» By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor MADISON —Cornfields in Madison and surrounding counties are turning green again despite the loss of topsoil during the |une 27, 1995 flood. "We're going to survive," said Brad larvis, a Virginia Cooperative Extension agent based in Madison County. "People visiting the Graves Mill area of Madison County are amazed at how much has been done," Jarvis said. "It's hard to believe they had a flood. They've cleaned up fields and picked up twisted sheet metal, tractors a...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

Farm Bureau News State cto/ry industry generates $855 million (Continued from page 1) Called the Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996, the new farm bill continues the dairy export incentive program. It allows the U.S. Department of Agriculture to work with the U.S. Dairy Export Council to promote dairy products overseas. Targeted countries include Mexico, Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong and China, said Ken Olson, a dairy specialist with the American Farm Bureau Federation. In Virginia, the dairy industry generated about $855 million in economic activity last year. Dairy farmers earned about $237 million in cash receipts. Rockingham is the leading dairy county, followed by Franklin and Augusta, based on their number of dairy farms and cows. "We're hopeful export marketing will provide additional income for dairy producers," Olson said. "Dairy producers all over the nation are starting to experience financial distress on farms because of high feed prices and low cull c...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

June 1996 Vou can eat healthy lunches on the run When you're short on time, there's nothing quite as convenient as stopping at a drive-through fast- food restaurant for a double cheeseburger, fries and a soft drink. Unfortunately, that convenience comes at a price of over 1,000 calories and 50 grams of fat. That's almost all the fat most adults need for an entire day. The good news is that it's getting much easier to find healthy selections in fast-food restaurants. Prostate Problems are a Man's Disease-Riaht? Prostate problems affect men physically but affect men & women emotionally! 100% NATURAL PROSTATE RELIEF GUARANTEED! If you suspect that your husband or male friend may be suffering from a prostate problem, then you have to help him. It is in your and his best interest for him to be healthy. Most men wait too long and endure pain too long before seeking help. Prostate problems may ultimately kill them or simply make them impotent for the rest of their lives. But, t...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

Farm Bureau News Questionnaire helps to spotlight opinions By CHRIS BAXTER Staff Writer and Designer What's your opinion about private property rights, food safety laws, state education funding and our current land-use assessment laws? Here's your chance to be heard. Participate in the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's policy development program and your ideas could help solve some of the challenges that face agriculture today. Every year at this time, county Farm Bureaus begin developing farm policy recommendations that they hope will be presented to legislators during the next General Assembly or in Congress. Farm Bureau members have many opportunities to raise agricultural issues and concerns that could impact their farm community. By completing the questionnaire on page 15 and returning it to your county Farm Bureau office, you can play an active part in the initial phase of policy development. "One of the most important functions of the Farm Bureau is to solve the problems of o...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

June 1996 Farm Bureau policy Is your policy. And if you want to help your county Farm Bureau develop policies on issues that will affect you, take a few minutes to fill out this questionnaire. The following questions relate to vital agricultural topics that affect farmers both directly and indirectly. Questionnaires will be used in forming policies that will be voiced in the Virginia General Assembly, Congress, and governmental agencies. To make sure your voice is heard, county resolutions committees need members' opinions by June 30. The policy development process begins in July in counties across the state. Answer only those questions that concern you. Check answers where appropriate or write answers on a separate sheet of paper. Mail or take your responses to your county Farm Bureau office by June 30. Ag Education/Research/ Extension Virginia Tech is currently developing a future plan for Virginia agriculture as it relates to agricultural education, research, and extension. 1. Wh...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

Farm Bureau News Tenant farming changing RICHMOND—In the past, farmers who rented land also shared government program payments with the landowner. It was up to them how they split the money. The new farm bill will change that relationship for many tenant farmers and landowners, said Donald Davis, state director for the Farm Service Agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Known as the 1996 Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act, the new farm bill requires farmers and tenant farmers to sign-up for a seven-year period instead of the traditional one-year enrollment. "Not many people want to get locked into a seven-year contract," Davis commented. Situations Internet helps farmers track harmful mold RALEIGH, N.C.—Through the Internet, tobacco farmers can get valuable information for dealing with damaging blue mold. Scientists at North Carolina State University have established a new Internet home page that predicts the movement of blue mold disease spores within the Southea...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

June 1996 Four new ways to keep your money working. Choose from these four money market funds: 1 Prime Cash Series 2 Municipal (Tax-Free) Cash Series 3 Government Cash Series 4 Treasury Cash Series Keep your cash working until you need it. To help you manage your money, Farm Bureau now has the Cash Trust Series of four money market mutual funds. Each fund offers income from a different portfolio of U.S. government securities, U.S. Treasury obligations, prime commercial paper, or tax-free municipal issues. You also get these "extras" ... and more: / Unlimited checkwriting privileges / Easy access to your money (no minimum amount) / Phol , e -i„ withdrawal /No sales charge* j Mo „ th , y slatemenls /No redemption penalty y Tol| _ free yje|d infomwlion „ , v ■ • y Dividends declared daily. For a free prospectus(es) containing more p a j d monl h]y complete information which you should read carefully before investing or sending money, or for yield information call B 1-800-647-8053 or in...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

Farm Bureau News (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words in Single letters or figures and groups of figures ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) > Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. > Deadline: Ads must be received by the 10th of each month. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each Issue in which they will appear. (Please fill in this classified ad form and send to the Farm Bureau News before the 10th.) NAM...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

June 1996 National wheat supplies are lowest in 48 years (Continued from page 1) after the discounts." "If I was a grower and I had any type of drying facility, I would go ahead and dry it," Coleman said. "Some grain companies want a mix: some they don't have to dry and some they have to dry." "Grain buyers use the discount rates to regulate the flow of grain coming into their facilities," said Tony Banks, an assistant director of the commodities marketing department of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "Grain buyers have a difficult time handling, storing and selling grain above the moisture level specified by market standards," said Guy Sturt, a farm management Extension agent. High moisture also causes insect and mold problems. Virginia Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services Market News & Information (Grain, Cotton, Tobacco, Livestock, Poultry, Eggs, Fruits & Vegetables) 1-800-552-5521 Available 24 hours a day "HEAVY BREED" SPECIAL! G...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

irgimffiiTwiT??! ■777*1 fflKI K! i r a 11 ifITH .MHSflfti ■ lg || Greater Choice Than We Have Offered Before II You choose the coverage...the doctors...the deductible you want. IK »,.«,! ► Coverages Customized For Your Needs |0F With a variety of core benefits - and with additional coverages and options you can customize your coverage to best fit your needs and budget. ipL, ..Over 90 Farm Bureau offices located throughout the state to give you personal service and ► The Farm Bureau Advantage — Another Savings Opportunity L Your Farm Bureau membership benefits will offer substantial discounts on other insurance products /* PTNj ? : |M§S such as Homeowner, Auto and Life provided through other insurance carriers. Plus you will receive K| H ■ 0 j|9| discounts on home and garden equipment and supplies, travel services...and many other products. g, f i m Contact the Virginia Farm Bureau to take advantage of the benefits offered by IgNSilif ItM igBH the 3 new Medical Insurance Programs fro...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1996

Farm Bureau Volume 55, Number 6 Peanut farmers may see paychecks shrink By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor Before the peanut crop is even harvested, Marvin L. Everett expects to see his family's peanut earnings shrink by $30,000. That's because the Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996 lowers the price support for peanuts from $678 to $610 per ton in Virginia. Also known as the new farm bill, Congress adopted it and President Clinton signed it into law in April. To make matters worse, Everett and his partner and son, M.L. Everett Jr., bought a $57,000 peanut harvester last fall. They haven't used it yet. To better control supply and demand for peanuts, Congress also lowered the quota for peanut production by 18.5 percent. "We were told we were producing too many peanuts," said Marvin Everett, a member of the board of directors of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "We had to bring production in line with demand. When we created a surplus, peanut processors fou...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1996

Farm Bureau News ®L I - jL Now that's a strawberry! Kindergartner Kramer Grim bites into a juicy one. Children from Rainbow Station Child Development Center in Richmond took a hay ride into the strawberry fields at Ashland Berry Farm and picked baskets of berries in May. Virginia forests shrinking RICHMOND—-Virginia's $9.8 billion-a-year forest industry remains healthy and growing— but warning signs are ahead if more isn't done to increase replanting of trees, according to a leading state forestry official. "The spotted owl and all those other pressures out West have shown that the South is going to be the woodbasket for the United States for the near future," explained J. Michael Foreman, chief of forest resources for the Virginia Department of Forestry. Landowners in Eastern Virginia are already cutting too many hardwood trees without replanting, and the situation is even worse for pine harvesting in far Southwest Virginia, Foreman said. The No. 1 problem facing Virginia's forest ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1996

July 1996 Program illustrates farmers' share of food dollar Did you know that the average Virginia and American farmer receives only 22 cents of every food dollar? Did you know that on aver- age one American farmer feeds 129 other people? Or did you realize that the average family spends only II percent of its take-home pay on food? Farm Bureau is aware of these surprising figures, but we're not sure consumers realize what a bargain their groceries really are, compared to other costs. Could the era of cheap food be leaving us? The 1996 farm bill is heralded as a revolution in agriculture, the biggest change in government farm policy since 1933. It can also be seen as the biggest change in consumer food policy. Farm Focus American Farm Hureati Federation No longer will the government stockpile grain or tell farmers what to plant. In concept, it's called freedom to farm. What does it mean for consumers? The 1996 farm bill, known as the FAIR Act, comes at a time of high grain prices an...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1996

Farm Bureau News jrm Mfc _ /fIHH n ffl , i x - m i I \il mm m Buyanew Dodge Truck and pick up a ton of cash. $500 CASH BACK TO FARM BUREAU'MEMBERS. As if our Magnum® engine series, overall the most powerful line of pickup engines on the planet, wasn't enough incentive for Farm Bureau members, now there's an extra $500 in the deal. That's $500 back on all 1996 5.9 L Magnum V-8 Ram and Ram Club Cab pickups, $500 back on all 1996 Cummins diesel-powered America's Truck Stop Ram and Ram Club Cab pickups ... and $500 back on select mid-size 1996 Dakota pickups. The offer SMmmmBL . BKhI includes all 1996 Ram Van and Ram Wagon models, too. That's on top of any other national Dodge cash back offer* All you need to do is get a certificate from your state's Farm Bureau validating that you've been a member for at least thirty days. Then stop by your Dodge dealer. Where you'll discover it pays to be in the Farm Bureau. ♦This cash back offer is valid for members of participating Farm Bureaus, exp...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1996

July 1996 VFBF membership reaches 117,710 (Continued from page 1) Last Nov. I Farm Bureau, which offers both farmers and non-farmers a number of rural programs and services, topped out at a then-record 117,622 members. The VFBF has also attained a national goal by reaching American Farm Bureau Federation quota, which requires state Farm Bureaus to gain one member more than the previous year's final membership count. State quota, which is 87 members more than American quota, was reached when a membership tally was taken June 3. "The VFBF quota is a combination of the year-end figures of every county plus one," said Brad Lowery, VFBF's director of field services. Virginia is the 12th largest Farm Bureau in the nation. The new AFBF Virginia Department of Agriculture S& Consumer Services Market News & Information (Grain, Cotton, Tobacco, Livestock, Poultry, Eggs, Fruits & Vegetables) 1-800-552-5521 Available 24 hours a day "HEAVY BREED" SPECIAL! Get b...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1996

Farm Bureau News Contest promotes rural health care By CHRIS BAXTER Staff Writer and Designer Rural areas need more health care professionals and the Virginia Farm Bureau is offering counties a program that could help raise youth interest in rural medicine. Farm Bureau's Rural Health Advisory Committee is coordinating a statewide essay contest for high school juniors and seniors. The essay theme is "My Future Career in Rural Health in Virginia." Rural areas lack medical personnel, said Gary Gentilini, director of program development and health care consultants with the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. Research indicates the patient load per primary care physician in Virginia ranges from 1,800 in urban areas to 3,900 in rural areas. "There is a real need for generalists, especially with the current push toward HMOs (Health Maintenance Organizations)." Gentilini said. "There are lots of jobs out there in general medicine, particularly in the rural areas." But for many family doctors, ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1996

July 1996 Virginia peanuts among industry's standard (Continued from page 1) farms over the next few years." The Everetts produce 300 acres of peanuts, which amounts to about 450 tons of peanuts. A good harvest will yield 3,000 pounds of peanuts per acre. The average yield for Virginia is 2,250 pounds per acre. While change seemed inevitable with the new farm bill, "we would have preferred to maintain the peanut program the way it was," said john Keeling, deputy director of agricultural policy with the American Farm Bureau Federation. "But with the political pressures, all in all, it was fairly successful. We were able to hold on to the quota system." The new peanut program will remain in place for seven years. "Although we took a hit on price and quota, we still came out fairly good," said Russell C. Schools, executive secretary of the Virginia Peanut Growers Association Inc. "We still have quotas and price supports, which is better than throwing everything away. "If we throw it al...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1996

Farm Bureau News South's largest cherry orchard draws thousands By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor ARARAT—They stood on ladders and ate for hours. It was opening day of the cherry picking season at the Levering Orchard, a pick-your-own orchard in Carroll County. Owners Frank Levering and Wanda UrbanskaLevering tallied 450 pickers on opening day, which was lunc 7. Customers drove away with 5,900 pounds of cherries. The following day, Saturday, some 725 pickers hauled away 3.5 tons of fruit. Some pickers drive from Florida to the Levering Orchard. With 4,000 trees and 31 acres, it's the largest cherry orchard in the South. Pickers ranged from preschoolers to grandparents on opening day. lust about every picker ate while on ladders leaning against trees. Chins and shirts sported red-dish-maroon cherry juice. Christopher Beattie and his wife, Catherine Snyder, and their 7- year-old son, Andrew, ) arrived at II a.m. and by 2 p.m., they had picked nearly six buckets of sweet cherries....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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