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Title: Australasian Chronicle Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 14,341 items from Australasian Chronicle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Strength of Mind. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

itrEllgtb of fJlinb. All men are equally desirous of happinnoss, but few are successful in the pursuit. One chief cause is the want of strength bfmind, which might enable them to resist the temptation of present ease or pleasure, and carry them forwarl in' the desire of more distant profit and enjnyment.* * . Hlow. ever poets may employ their, wit and eloquence in celebrating present pleasure, and rejecting all dis. taut views to fame;hoealth, or forttinuo, it is obvious that this practice is the source of all dissoluteness and disorder, repentance, and misery. A man of stsong determlne.l temper, adheres tenacious!y" to his general resolutions, and is neither seduced by the allurements of pleasure,- nor terrified by the menaces of pain; but keeps,still in view those dis tant pursuits, by which he at once ensures his hap piness and his honour. IIun?e. LAZY CLun,.-They .have a lazy club in the west, A, member was expelled the other day for running;down hill, and another for talking wi...

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"The Church" in New Zealand. To the Editor of the Australasian Chronicle. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

"EUe t urrb" in WNtO Zralattb. To the Editor of the Australasian Chronicle. Srn,-Thouh not a subscriber to your paper, I have perused most of the numbers which have reached New Zealand, and have had occasion to remark that its columns are open to fair discussion, and above all, to the exposure of vice and hypo. crisv. I therefore trust you will, without any hesitation, bring to public notice facts which will astonish, and doubtless disgust many of your readers. You are, very likely, aware that New Zealand has been for several years past under the influence of some individuals called Church Miis sionaries. What their duties are, you may imagine: the way in which they have hitherto performed them, 1 will try to acquaint you with. Most of these men, never having received any education, and springing from the lowest classes of society, on leaving their native country, never had that grand and glorious object in view-that of reclaim. ing from heathenism to a purerer creed, the simple and...

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Pursuit of Knowledge. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

li~nrruit of Utnolnlrbge. " I learned grammar, says Cobbett, when I was a private soldier on the pay of sixpence a-day. The edge of my berth, or that of the guard-bed, was my seat to study in; my knapsack was my bookcase; a bit of board, lyingon my lap, was my writing table; and. the task did not demand any thing like a year of any life. I had no money to purchase candle or oil; in winter time it was rarely that I could get any evening-light but that of the fire, and only my turn even of that. And, if I, under such circumstances, and without parent or friend to advise or encourage me, accomplished this undertaking, what excuse can there be for any youth, however poor, however pressed with business, or however circumstanced as to room or other conveniences? To buy a pen or a sheet of paper I was compelled to forego some por tion of food, though in a state of half-starvation; I had no moment of time that I could call my own; I had to read and to write amidst the talking, laugh ing, si...

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Shipping Intelligence. ARRIVALS. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

Sjf tpttrg ntclttllt?cclwe.-,: ARRIVALS. FaBnuAnY 19.-From the Bay of Islands, the 8th instant, the barque Samuel Iinter, Captain lRoberlson, with 260 tons of oil, and whalunbono. Passengers-Miss Ellent O'Cliffe, Messrs. Brown, O'Brien, liallingall, Mbacrone, 'ltargreaves, a.un. darice, and Dalzioll. DSPARTURES. FnanuArv 18.-For Boston, the American ship Shepherdess. Piiasengers-Cnptain Westin. 19.-For. Manilla, the American ship Ceylon, Captain Windsor. 19.-For London, the ship AMedway, Captain Griffin. Passengers--Mrs. Griffin, Captain Ken. nedy and lady, lres. Davis, child, and servant, Dr. Hampden, Messrs. Webber, Scott, Severn, Master ltdbinson, Mr. and Mrs. Palmer and 3 children, Mr. and Mrs. ltansdcn, John and Rlichard Mar shirll, Mr; Hooper,'and three invalids of I1.M.S. Alligator. 19.-For Batavia, the barque Charlotte, Capt. Forrester, in ballast. 19 -For Calcutta, the Thoinas King. 19.-For Norfolk Island, the Gorernor Phillip. 'PRIOJECTED DEPARTURES. .Achilles and Success,...

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Calendar for the ensuing Week. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

Q~aln?bar for tIe nsnating amlie lt, SDMEMORANDA. 21 Fr. S. Peter's Chair at Antioch g. d. 22 S. Sexagesima Sunday. 23 SuN. S. Matthias Ap. d. 2nd. 24 M. Moun's last quar. 8 h. 55 m., evening. 25 T. 26 W. 27 Th. 28 F. Sun rises 5 h. 38 m. sets 6 h. 22 m.

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
To Correspondents. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

Co 4!orre0pontenths. * * All communications to be addressed to the iditor, at the CugaoNctL.u O.tce, 67, Pitt-street, Sydneiy.

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Childish Conceit Corrected. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

IJItlboTJ cottnceit Qrovtrecteb. I was lolling one evening on my father's knee, waiting to receive my usual modicum of three roasted chesnuts, when my mother happened to say, " Pray take care of my beautiful goblet, Mr. Hiarding,-water so hot will break it I fear." My father was mixing his wine with hot water, and he sot down the jug till the water would got cooler. "Such nonsense, mamma," said I pertly, " how can water, which is soft break glass ?" My mother was going away, and did not hear nme, but my father looked closely, and, as I fancied, admi ringly, at his " clever little Jane." " Do you think hot water cannot break glass, Jane ?" "Surely not, papa,-how should it stand to reason, that water, which is soft,"-and I triumphantly repeated my former assertion, or, as I thought, rational argument. We were now alone at table. " So I find little Jane does not take things on hearsay,-quite right that," said my father, " she grows a reasoner-wiser than her mother."-Oh, no, papa, don't...

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
On True Happiness, [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

Oil Mrst, applnafs., The desire of happiness in general is so natural to us, that all the world are in pursuit of it;:all have this one end in view, though they. take such dif. ferent methods to attain it, and are so much:divided in their notions of it. Evil, as evil, can never be chosen ;, and though evil is often the effect of our own choice, yet we never desire it, but under the appearance of an imaginary good. Many things we indulge ourselves In may be con. sidered by us as evils, and yet be desirable ; but then they are only considered as evils in their effects and consequences, not as evils at present, and attended with immediate misery. Reason represents things to us, noteonly as they are at present, but as they are in their whole nature and tendency; passion only regards them in the former light; when' this governs us, we are regard. less of the future, and are only affected with the present. " It is impossible over to enjoy ourselves rightly, if our conduct be riot such' as...

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The News. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

We qopy the.following communication from the Hobart Town Advertiser, addressed to the Editor of that Journal: There is a class of the Colonial community now labouring under grievous disabilities who look to you to bring under the notice of the authorities and the public, the grievances of which they. complain. I allude to the maembers" pf the Jewish persuasion, who are by law dies enabled fro;n legally holding any. land in the Colony. In the Alother Country this is not ease, the Legislature having removed that peculiar disability from British subjects of the, Jewish persuasion. The immense estate near Shureham, lately purchased by Mr. J.. L. Goldsnmid, is a well,.known instance of land being held by a Jew in England. I would also obihsrve that by an Act of Common COiuin cil, Jews are permitted to hold rinot only land, but every other municipall privilege in . the City of London.; and the appointment of Mi. Sulomons as a Magistrate for the Colinty .of Kent, shews that even offices, o...

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
News and Humours of the Day. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

N1ett0 attnb tiutottra of the lDau. The Commercial Bank hasestablished a Branch' at Windsor under the superintendence of' F. Beddut, Esq.... It is intended to establish a egiutar Mail between Sydney and the seat of Captain libsonas Government,,in New Zealand; as soon as the latter' shall be known...:. ;The Royal Exchange ' Rooms' are now open for the transaclion of businits, bilt tleyare as yet but' indifferently furnished.....Th Now SydneylBanking Company commenced busin as' bn Monday last; we have visited the interioir 6f't?t Sank, and were much gratified by the ?busiiiesablilk tnd oiderly appearance it preesets.:..''llero are to hno less than 16 seldiers of .the garrison no-iiiideti cdan. inuement in the Bydney Gaol"; 'some of whom are awaiting' their' trials,on that chhargo of felot?y,'and 'the remainder under'sentence O(eoonflobinetit ...: A Pigeon ,shooting, match is beiog. goaip' bjyMr; Gan hon, for St. Patrick's Jsy-- ho prir 'to be:a ftmo;r. poney..Tpho Samnudl !HVinter 'ha...

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Cape of Good Hope. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

(ape of 6ooD mlope. The Emigrants from the Cape Colony to Port Natal have declared them Independence of British Authority, and their determination to inflict death upon all strangers, landing as Emigrants without their previous consent. A long declaration from the " Assembly" of the new republic appears in the Cape papers of the 4th December; which concludes with the following : " RESOLUTION. "'That in case of any landing of strangers as Emigrants in the Port of Natal, without the pre vious consent of the Assembly having been obtain ed, such Emigrants shall be considered as enemies of the State. " That should the arrival of Emigrants be at tended by such military force as shall be enabled to prevent us from opposing their landing, we will then retreat into the forests, mountains, and kloofs, which surround the Bay in every direction, and there defend ourselves in separate small parties, as did the oppressed Spaniards, and, according to the principle.. of Don Carlos, neither take nor...

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
To the Editor of the Australasian Chronicle. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

Tp ti o 6,eldiordqf t: Ale "4yqlras .Chronicl.'; Sin.--Y was much gratied by.your leading article g Fu~day, .14th ,inotant, ltpfind that .hoatPatriotic. Assoc ation had, not. bepm idie or; lurnperin tduring' the last two.├Żeart; ihoughbj rin its, tetalailenc, it affordel tha Vary prcssand T'ory man in this Colony every, opporjun ty to iavent tnc cecoot designs cal culaed to defeat its main objects, and mislead its best friends in the British Parliament. Much blame may be nttached to its Secretaries, who, although professed patriots thl'mselves, and editors of thre press, at all times, and upon all occasions, itositivdly refused to negative the base and malignant lies which daily appeared, stating it was beneath their mighty, notice, when. all the timne, it was the fear of offiendng their few Tory. frieods. But however un fortunate it may have been in its Secretaries, the Associatiou has only itself to blame, for depending on its Secretaries' using their power to do more than otter jo...

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
To the Editor of the Australasian Chronicle. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

To the Editor of the Australasian 'hronicle. Mn. Etrron,--I beg leave to call the attention of the military authorities through the medium of your valuable Journal, to the disgraceful conduct of the soldiery, whoseo,drunkenness and insolence now form a general theme of complaint. Scarcely a day passes during the week which the public are not compelled to become the unwilling spectators or conduct which tends not only to demoralize the in dividuals so offending, but to aslix an indelible stain upon the profession of which they are unwrorthy members. It is trumly disgraceful that men who are appointed and paid by the public for the preservation of order should be the most active in disturbing the peace of their fellow-subjects, and.something ought surely to be done to remedy so great an evil. Let but the reins 6f discipline be tightened, and an. ex ample made bf a few of the principal offinders, and the henetficial effects'awll soon become manifest in the imprbved coiididci ef: the wh...

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOMO VERMIS. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

HOMO VERMIS. We are all creeping worms of the earth. Some are silk-worms, great by birth,. Glow-worms some, that shine by night, Slow-worms some, apt to bite ; Some are muck-worms, slaves to wealth, Maw-worms some, that wrong the health; Some, to the public no good-willers, Canker-worms, and caterpillars. Found about the earth we're crawling; For a sorry life we're sprawling; Putrid stuff we suck, it fills us, Death then sets his foot and kills us. Table Talk.

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POETRY. THE LEAF AND THE STEM. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

'1 PO ETRYt, THE LEAF AND TIlE STEM. A child played with a summer leaf, Green was the leaf and bright; Ne'er had he*known a pang of grief, His merry heart thrilled light. An old man gazed on a wither'd stem, The leaf's life all was gone; 'rwas autumn's ghastly diadem A tear-drop fell thereon. Spring passed away: the child grew old, His pleasant scenes had fled; The winter's breath had left him cold, Now sleeps he with the dead. The old man can no more be found, A heap of dust is there; Concealed beneath a grassy mound, Where is life's light-say where ? Alt ! where art thou, my merry boy? And thou, my sombre man t Childhood's shrill laugh of love and joy ? Say, wisdom, if you can I Where is the emerald leaf of spring? Shrivell'd on autumn's breast, Death's mother I 'Tis a fearful thing That youth on age must rest. T. J. OusELEY.

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Queen. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

The Queen. From a late nymber of the Windsor Journal, we learn that an affair has occurred at the Castle, which has been the occasion of great excitement. It ap pears that several panes of glass have been broken in Her Majesty's or one of the rooms immediately adjoining the Royal Bed-room. A number of flint stones have beeoon discovered in those apartments, which imply that the win dows must have been broken from the exterior; nevertheless, although strict enquiries have been made among the guards and those connected with Her Majesty's Household (without whose knowledge the outrage could scarcely have been committed), the affair still re mains wrapped in mystery.--Times.

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Unknown Painter. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

The Unknown Painter. (From Chambers' Edinburgh Journal.) One beautiful summer morning, about the year 1030, 'several youths of Seville approached the dwelling of the cele brated painter Murillo, where they ar rived nearly at the same time. After the usual salutations, they entered the studio. Murillo was not yet there, and each of the pupils walked up quickly to his easel to examine if the paint had dried, or perhaps admire his work of the previous evening. Mondez, with a careless air, approach ed his easel, when an exclamation of astonishment escaped him, and he gazed in mute surprise on his canvass, on which was roughly sketehed. a most beautiful head of the Virgin; but the expression was so admirable, the lines so clear, the contoir so graceful, that compared with the figures by which it was encircled, it seemed as if some :heavenly visitant had descendd among them. " Ah, what is the matter?" said a rough voice: The pupils turned at the sound, and all made a respectful obeis ance...

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

AGENTS:-lBungadore, Mr. John Dwyer; Berrima, Mr. M. Doyle ; Braidwobd, Mr. P. Goulding, Postmastor; Brisbane Water, Mr. Thomas Humphreys; Bathurst, Mr. Richard Jones; Campbell Town, Mr. Hurley; Goulbourn, Mr. Joseph Bull; Hobart Town, Mr. Philip Smith; Liverpool, Mr. William Pritchard*;Launceston, Mr. T. W. Cowell;' Maitland, Mr. Dee; Patrick's Plains, Mr. Thomas Cullen ; Patersnn, Mr. David Browne, Bush Inn; Port Philip, Mr. Kclsh; Parramatta, Mr Fitzsimmons, Innkeeper; Penrith, Mr.Purcell, Queanbeyan and Manaroo, Mr.Thomas Shanohan; Wollongong, Mr,. Edward Elliott.; Windsor and Richmond, -r. E. Coffey; .Yass, Mr. Edward Walsh.---ublished in the.United Kingdom byMr.. Jones, 63, Paternoster Row, London; Mr. W. J. Battereby, 5, Essex Bridge, Parliament-street, Dublin; Mrs. Stain, 9, Union Place; Edinburgh; and Mr. Kennedy, Glasgowt. For Hobart Town irect,, Positively to sail on Thuursday next, 20th instant. TIHE fine' fast-sailing SJl. yacht.built brig-HIND. The whole of her freight ...

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Sketches in Sydney. No. IX. THE STREETS BY DAY. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

Sketches in Sydney. No. IX. THE STREETS BY DAY. How many droll subjects for the Sketch-book crowd round every step taken in the streets. Here are houses of all kinds, of all ages, and for all pur poses, standing cheek-by-jowl, like an awkward squad; your three-story-high-aristocrat looking down upon the two story-shopocrat, and he in return turning up his nose against the ground-floor demno crat; astone, stucco, brilch, and wood, ranged in threes or fours, in and out like "a dog's hind legs," and such as are the houses so also are the owners. h'lIe seve,-jot ..some hint Native, standing like the Colossus of llhodes, you might put a wheel-barrow between his legs without iujursng his shins; the square shouldered S awney, seeking the siller; the sharp lath-like Cockney; Chawbacons in dozens,. and broths of boys by scores; sailors without ships; soldiers without discipline, and Jews without beards. Ten is the time the bustle commences. The small fry of accountants have got perched on th...

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Good Advice. [Newspaper Article] — Australasian Chronicle — 21 February 1840

" Let the new-married husband resolve never to spend an hour from his home, un less business or some necessary or rational purpose demand it. Where ought he to be ? What other company ought he deem so good and so fitting, as that of the person whom he himself hath chosen to be his parteer for life. * * * * * * " * "Let the young married man try the thing: let him resolve not to be seduced from his home: let him never go, in one single instance, unnecessarily, from his own fire-side. Habit is a powerful thing; and if he begin right, the pleasure that he will derive from it will induce him to continue right. This is not being ' tied to the apron-strings,' which means quite another matter, as I shall show by-and by. It is being at the husband's place, whether he have children or not. And is there any want of matter for conversa tion between a man and his wife? Why not talk of the daily occurrences to her, as well as to any body else, and especi ally to a company of tippling and noisy m...

Publication Title: Australasian Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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