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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A FLOATING FACTORY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

A FLOATING FACTORY. —♦—     Taking the factory to the raw material, in- stead of bringing the material to the factory, is an innovation just put into operation on the Mississippi River by a button factory, and it is a plan that has many practical advantages. This factory is a boat 42ft. long and 12ft. wide, fitted with all of the necessary machinery for the manufacture of buttons, and provided with a three-horse-power engine for its work. The principal material used by this factory is mussel shells, which are found at nearly all points along the river, and one of the great ex- penses in conducting the business heretofore has been the cost of transporting the shells. Now the factory has reversed the operation, and will go to the mussels. When a bed of the shells is found, the boat will drop its anchor and go to work. When the bed is exhausted it will move on to a new loca- tion. In this fashion it will go from State to State, from Minnesota to Louisiana, pas...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A RECORD SINGLE-SPAN ARCH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

A RECORD SINGLE-SPAN ARCH. The longest single-span arch ever constructed is now being built over the Petrusse Valley at the expense of the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg. It will have a span of 275½ft. The roadway will be 144ft. above the Petrusse River, a small brook whose deep valley sepa- rates Luxemburg from the site of its new rail- way station. The arch will, in reality, consist of two parallel bridges 19ft. 7in. apart, the foundations of which are concrete. The whole plan of construction is novel. The roadway is supported over the spandrels by four 17½ft. semi-circular arches at each end, and beyond the main 275½ft. arch are two 70.8ft. arches. The total width of the bridge between the parapets will be 52½ft. The stone, which is said to be of excellent quality, is furnished from quarries in the im- mediate vicinity. The materials to be used are approximately 776,952 cubic feet of masonry, 28,262 cubic feet of wood for scaffoldings, and 45 tons of metal (iron, zinc, and cables). The...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BY THE HOUR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

BY THE HOUR. A minister's life, like that of the policeman, is not always "a happy one." In the course of his many duties the clergyman meets with all sorts and conditions of men and women. A young minister recently had the following amusing ex- perience:— Shortly after his introduction to a new con- gregation, he made a round of visits so that he might become familiar with the various members. Among those visited was an elderly female who was busy cleaning her house for the approaching New Year festivities. The minister met with a somewhat brusque reception from the good lady, and finding her the reverse of gossipy, he made his visit as short as possible. Ere leaving, how- ever, he thought it better to ask if he should offer up prayer. To his consternation he received the reply— "Very well, sir, you can pray if you like, but you must cut it kind o' short, as I have my whitenin' brush, on hire by the hour!"

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IN PLAIN LANGUAGE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

IN PLAIN LANGUAGE.   "You say," said the judge to a witness, "that the plaintiff in this case resorted to an ingenious use of circumstantial evidence." "That's what I said, your Honor," replied the witness. "What do you mean by that?" asked the judge. "My exact meaning, your Honor," replied the witness, "Is that he lied." —Chicago "News."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A RARE BIRD IN THE SOUDAN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

A RARE BIRD IN THE SOUDAN. Mr. Harry P. Witherby completes his narra- tive of his experiences in the Soudan in "Know- ledge" for December; and in doing so gives an account of his search for "a rare and beautiful goatsucker." Only four specimens of this bird were known, and they had been brought home many years ago: three by Ruppell, and one by either Schimper or Baron von Muller. The exact locality from which they came was uncertain, but it was known to be from some- where in the Sennaar district. Consequently the bird was one of our possible prizes, and was hunted for accordingly. The plumage of the   head and back of this lovely goatsucker is like burnished gold with small spots and bars of black end grey, while the breast is buff colored. A bird of such coloring should evidently live among yellow sand, but the desert for the most part of the country we traversed was of a gritty grey color. It was not until we were within 12 miles of Khartoum on our return, he says, t...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LIKE ANCIENT GREEKS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

LIKE ANCIENT GREEKS. Like a chapter from a romance is the story of a little colony of people which has settled on one of the beautiful islands of the Samoa group, where it is trying to live the life of the ancient Greeks. Everyone wears the old Greek dress, and the Greek system of education in music and athletics is followed. The manner of living is simple. Tropical fruits and vegetables are eaten, and the whole life of the colonists is described as healthy and delightful. Every afternoon the little community meets in a large arbor overhung with flowers, and here a concert is held and music and other arts discussed. It is, doubtless, a strange and pic- turesque sight, for no modern dress is visible, only the classic robes of the ancient Athenians. The idea of the colonists being to rear a handsome, healthy race of men and women, no sickly people were allowed to join in the en- terprise. Great hopes are entertained of the children of the colony, who are being brought up under ideal c...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
READY DEMONSTRATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

READY DEMONSTRATION. "Do you think you can make my daughter happy?" asked Miss Thirty-smith's father, gravely. "Why, I have already, haven't I?" replied   Spooner, "I've asked her to marry me."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Newly Invented Talking Machine. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

A Newly Invented Talking Machine. This machine, invented by Dr. Marage, of Paris, faithfully reproduces the vowel sounds, a e i o u. It is designed on strictly mathematical principles, and the sounds are obtained by the use of acetylene gas. The vowel sounds are made by a series of vibrations of different intensity. For years inventors have endeavored to perfect a talking machine, and the siren has been used to imitate the human voice. But as is well known not only the larynx but also the cheeks play an important part in the production of sound, adding the harmonies which give the voice its character. The doctor made a number of false mouths out of plaster of Paris, even equipping them with imitation teeth and gums. Scientists are greatly interested in Dr. Marage's experiments, for if it is at all possible to faithfully imitate the vowels the same sirens used on ships may also be made to do so.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BLUEBEARD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

BLUEBEARD.   Mr. Hamall's humorous- poster, showing Mr.   Dan Leno as Sister Anne sweeping the horizon   (at Drury Lane Theatre, London) in search of   someone to protect her sister Fatima.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE DIFFICULTY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

THE DIFFICULTY. Bertha: "On general principles, I don't believe   in fibbing about one's age, but there are times   when one hardly knows what to do."     Edith: "As for instance?"   Bertha: "It's my birthday to-morrow, and Fred   has threatened to give me a kiss for every year   that I am old."   Edith: "And what are you going to do?"   Bertha: "That's just what bothers me. If I   tell him I am older than I am it may get out,   and it will have to stand, for of course my   friends would never permit me to drop off a year   under any circumstances. On the other hand,   if I take off a year or two, then Fred won't—.     You see the difficulty yourself."   —"Boston Trans-   cript."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HIGHEST BALLOON ASCENT MADE. OVER SIX MILES FROM EARTH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

HIGHEST BALLOON ASCENT MADE.   —♦— OVER SIX MILES FROM EARTH.   A note in the November number of the "Deutsche Rundshau fur Geographie" gives a brief description of a balloon ascent made on July 31 last, by Drs. Berson and Suring, of the Berlin Meteorological Institute, during which a higher altitude was reached than had ever before been attained by man. The highest previous record was made during an ascent by Berson in 1894 (December 5), on which occasion an altitude of 9155 metres (30,022ft.) was reached. This has now been considerably exceeded, the two observers having passed the enormous alti- tude of 10,300 metres (33,790ft.). Up to 29,500ft. no unusual sensations were ex- perienced, and even up to 33,800ft. the observa- tions could be regularly continued, though con- sciousness was temporarily lost for brief in- tervals. Soon after this, however, one of the observers resisted all the efforts of his companion to arouse him, and the latter accordingly w...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CABBIE AND HIS FARE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

CABBIE AND HIS FARES.   There is a world of sense in the remark which Mr. Kennedy made recently:—"If you give a cabman 1s 3d for a shilling fare," he said, "he thanks you, but if you give him 1s 6d he says nothing, because he thinks you didn't know." Mr. Kennedy, however, was wrong in one point. If you give him 1s 6d he does not remain silent. He looks at it with a smile of lofty disdain, and says, "What's this for? My fare's 'two bob.' "— London "Globe."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Among the Magazines. WHY BE A LADY? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

Among the Magazines.   WHY BE A LADY?   In the "Pall Mall Magazine," which, by the   way, begins the new year with an exceptionally   stronger number, Menie Muriel Dowie, in an inci-   sive article, entitled "Why be a Lady?" shows the   foolishness and futility of women who must earn   their own livelihood clinging to their "gentle-   hood," and sacrificing everything to it. Among a   number of newspaper advertisements illustrating   her points she has this one:—   "Wanted, gentlewoman, to pay small sum   weekly and teach girl of eight French, music,   drawing—"   Three accomplishments—French, drawing, and   music. And she is to pay for teaching them! I   should exhaust the fount of exclamation marks   if I attempted to express my astonishment at this  ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DR. CLIFFORD'S BOYHOOD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

DR. CLIFFORD'S BOYHOOD.   Dr. Clifford tells the story of his early struggles in this month's "Temple Magazine." "My parents were working people," he says, "and I received but a very scanty share of educa- tion at the village school. I began life in a lace factory when I was eleven years old, and I may say that I know the lace trade from top to bot- tom—at least as it was 50 years ago. I worked at first as an ordinary 'hand;' and in those days the factory laws were in their infancy and the condi- tions of labor exceedingly onerous. The hours were terribly long, and I have work- ed all night again and again when a boy." At 16 the future preacher was a manager in the lace- mending department. Later he was made a book- keeper by his employer, and this gave him his first opportunity of rising.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
KISSING THE BOOK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

KISSING THE BOOK. Mr. Justice Byrne, says the "Law Journal," has rendered a useful service in calling atten- tion to the provisions of the Oaths Act, 1888. Nobody accustomed to attend the courts can have failed to observe the growing reluctance of witnesses to kiss the Book—a reluctance which has become more evident since the out- break of smallpox in London. It is a reluctance with which it is impossible not to sympathise; but what is strange is that the witnesses who display it do not realise that the Legislature has enabled them to be sworn without the dangerous part of the ceremony to which they object. The Oaths Act, 1888, provides that "if any person to whom the oath is adminis- tered desires to swear with uplifted hand, in the form and manner in which the oath is usually administered in Scotland, he shall be permitted to do so, and the oath shall be administered to him in such form without further question." It is evident that this provision is among the things not generally ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE CASKET LETTERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

THE CASKET LETTERS. To the January number of the "Pall Mall   Magazine" Sir Herbert Maxwell contributes a   fascinating account of Mary Queen of Scots and the Casket Letters, which are the subject of so much discussion just now. The casket was of silver gilt, about a foot long, in an outer cover of velvet, and was engraved in several places with the initial F, under a royal crown. It was delivered up to the Government, after the application of torture, by Robert Douglas, who had been found in possession of some of Bothwell's papers shortly after the murder of Darnley and the marriage of Mary to Bothwell. If the casket was really Bothwell's, the in- ference is that it had been a gift to him from   Mary, the crowned initial being that of her first husband, Francois II. of France. The contents of the casket consisted of eight letters in French addressed to Bothwell by the Queen, and 11 love sonnets. All the originals, it was alleged, were in Mary'...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SCIENTIFIC GARDENING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

SCIENTIFIC GARDENING. Scientific gardening is taught in the national schools of Sweden and in the seminaries for the education of national school teachers. There is a school garden in nearly every rural school dis- trict in the kingdom. The garden is placed near the schoolhouse, and the children receive prac- tical instruction in the cultivation of plants, berries, flowers, herbs, and fruits, the manage- ment of hot-beds, greenhouses, and so forth. The parishes are required to furnish the necessary ground for the gardens, and trees and shrubs are annually given to the children to be planted at their homes.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE ASSUMPTION OF THE CUCUMBER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

THE ASSUMPTION OF THE CUCUMBER. A writer in the Christmas number of the "Gardeners' Magazine" gives an amusing des- cription of the cucumber. He writes: The cool- ness of the cucumber consists in its audacious assumption of solidity with a minimum of justifi- cation. Here we have a massive-looking club as big, maybe, as a policeman's truncheon, and yet, when we come to analyse it, it is practically a yard of pump-water with a pinch or two of salt in it. About one-twentieth of its mass is aught but aqua pura, and yet, not only does this vegetable fraud pose as an individual of substance, though only worth a shilling in the pound, so to speak, but it is not even solvent in another sense, that is, gastronomically, since it resists diges- tion, and breeds the hideous nightmare in the struggle. Architecturally, indeed, the cucumber is one of Nature's wonders.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE PORTLAND VASE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

THE PORTLAND VASE.   Among the many priceless relics of Greece and Rome, exhibited in the Gold Ornament Room of the British Museum, none surpasses in interest or beauty the world-famed Portland vase. In the January number of the "Pall Mall Magazine" appeared the story of this famous work by Mr. A. W. Jarvis. Quite a chance discovery led to the rescue of this magnificent specimen from the grave where, for hundreds of years, it had lain hidden and unknown. In the early part of the seventeenth century some laborers, digging on a hillock in the neighborhood of Rome, came across a large vault. Examination revealed a suite of three sepulchral chambers. In the largest one was found a finely sculptured sarcophagus. On opening it this ex- quisite example of ancient art was disclosed to the eyes of the astonished workmen.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MASTER OF DISGUISE. EXTRAORDINARY TRIAL OF 225 ALLEGED SMUGGLERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

A MASTER OF DISGUISE. EXTRAORDINARY TRIAL OF 225 ALLEGED SMUGGLERS. The most sensational trial of smugglers which   has taken place for many years commenced on   Friday, December 20, at Pont&alier, on the   Franco-Swiss frontier.   The leader of the band, a man named Derobert,   and 224 of his associates are charged with at- tempting to clandestinely pass a large quantity of tobacco and phosphorus across the French frontier. Seventy-eight French and Swiss Cus- toms officials are cited as witnesses. Derobert, a man of extraordinary cunning, was known on the frontier as the king of smug- glers. His ingenious ruses were worthy of Sher- lock Holmes. At his house were discovered hundreds of disguises, consisting of false beards and moustaches, wigs, and complete suits of clothes representing workmen, gentlemen, com- mercial travellers, etc., in every trade and pro- fession, and correct in every detail. Derobert's me...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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