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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

The Indian Advocate. 125 being guilty of such a dangerous act of sacrilege. But the thought that our dear Lord and Saviour sits in the confes sional in the person of His authorized agent the priest should really appeal not so much to our fears as to our feel ings of confidence, of love and of gratitude. Oh, what a heavenly boon is the confessional to the truly penitent heart, burdened with sin and longing for peace! It is because we too often do not feel the sinfulness even of venial sin in the sight of God, that we do not realize and fully enter into the blessedness the peace, the comfort and the satisfaction that flows from the absolution of the priest after a good confession. But our Protestant friends tell us that they prefer to go directly to Christ for the forgiveness of their sins. Well, we will not say one word to discourage them from going directly to their Saviour and deriving all the comfort they can from their petitions for pardon. No doubt, if they are sincerely peniten...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

126 The Indian Advocate. and as they went they were healed. This would seem to con firm the Catholic contention that it is a great and well-established principle of the divine economy, as made known in the Christian system, that men should be saved through the in strumentality of divinely appointed means and agencies; in other words, by the ministry, the sacraments and ordinances of the Church. Among those sacraments one of the most conspicuous and consoling is that of penance. Of this every true penitent of the Catholic Church has had frequent and most blessed experience. That the tribunal is too often approached in a perfunctory manner is no argument against the confessional any more than the perfunctory performance. A Staggering Price. President Kruger's prediction that to subjugate the Boers would cost a price that would stagger humanity has been veri fied over and over again. The war has now been gong on for two and a half years dreary and deadly years for both sides. The offic...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

The Indian Advocate. 127 C ii .? . i- T An A T C -- W :i JJUUlXJO it TU " t Rev. Albert J. Bader, Chaplain of the Eighth Cavalry, U. S. A., lately of New York, is now stationed at Fort Reno, Okla. The Committee on Territories agreed on an omnibus bill for the ad mission of Oklahoma, Arizona and New Mexico as States. Capt. Curtis Piller, after staying six years with us, returned to his native England, where he intends to spend the remainder of his days. Asher, our sister town, seven miles southwest of the Mission, is daily improving. What will it be when the Choctaw will puff in her midst? Romulus, a wee town some fifteen miles from here, is on a "boom." Well, it takes a railroad or a Salvation Army corps to go in that direction. Representative Curtis, of Kansas, has introduced a bill authorizing the Secretary of Agriculture to establish an agricultural station in the In dian Territory. Rather than submit to a hair-cut, eight full-blood Cherokee Indians were arrested recently, charge...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

128 The Indian Advocate. The Secretary of the Potato Growers' Association of Pottawatomie County is authority for the statement that there are now planted in Irish potatoes over 5,000 acres in said county. Last season 165 car-loads of early potatoes were shipped to Chicago from Shawnee alone. According to the Catholic Directory for 1902, the Catholic population of this Vicariate, including Indian and Oklahoma Territories, is 20,455, an increase of 1,410 over last year. They have 1 college for boys, 8 acade mies for young ladies, two industrial schools; 22 schools for whites, 12 for Indians, 2 for negroes and 26 parish schools. The total school population is 2,878. Last month, Rev. Fr. Constantine, O.. S. B., of El Reno, Okla., laid the corner-stone of a new church, which, according to public reports, is to be the finest in the Vicariate of Indian Territory. He was assisted by Rev. Fr. I. Ricklin, O. S. B., of Anadarko, Okla., and Rev. Fr. de Hasque, of Chickasha, I. T. Rev. Fr. Rick...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

V Vol. XIV. N The Indian Advocate Ml AY, 1902. THE RIVER. Amid the rushes preen and slight, Beneath the willows tall and strong, Wave after wave, so fast and bright, The river runs along. I see it flow; away, away, Along the same broad, even track, The waves sweep onward night and day, But never one comes back. And thus it is, time passes by, Nor ever stops for joy or pain; Thus years, and clays, and moments fly, But never come back again. The shadows on the river fall, The wave reflects them every one, The bending rush, the poplar tall, But carries witlf it none. And every virtue, every crime, Our thoughts, our deeds, our feelings, cast A shadow on the stream of time, As it goes rushing past. Then, as we watch the river flow, Think we how time doth ever glide, And pray we that our lives may throw Bright shadows on the tide. No. 5

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

130 The Indian Advocate. - r && ! History of the Kiowas, i & ft From the Report of the Bureau of Ethnology. lf,?ij i :: '" ; According to Kiowa mythology, which has close parallels among other tribes, their first ancestors emerged from a hol low cottonwood log at the bidding of a supernatural progeni tor. They came out one at a time as he tapped upon the log until it came to the turn of a pregnant woman, who stuck fast in the hole and thus blocked the way for those behind her so that they were unable to follow, which accounts for the small number of the Kiowa tribe. The same being gave them the sun, made the division of day and night, exterminated a num ber of malevolent monsters, and rendered the most ferocious animals harmless; he also taught them their simple hunting arts and finally left them to take his place among the stars. Other wonderful things were done for them by a supernatural boy hero, whose father was the son of the Sun and whose mother was an earthly woma...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

The Indian Advocate. 131 they say, while on a hunting expedition on one occasion, a dis pute occurred between two rival chiefs over the possession of the udder of a female antelope, a delicacy particularly prized by Indians. The dispute grew into an angry quarrel, with the result that the chief who failed to secure the coveted por tion left the party and withdrew with his band toward the northwest, while the rest of the tribe moved to the southeast, crossed the Yellowstone, and continued onward until they met the Crows ("crow people"), with whom they had hitherto been unacquainted. By permission of the Crows they took up their residence east of that tribe, with which they made their first alliance. Up to this time they had no horses, but used only dogs and the travois. For a while they continued to visit the mountains, but finally drifted out into the plains, where they first procured horses and became acquainted with the Arapaho and Cheyenne, and later with the Dakota. Keim, writin...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

132 The Intdian Advocate. age is intellectually a child, and from the point of view of civilized man his history is shaped by trivial things, as will be sufficiently apparent from a study of the calendars. It is said that a war between the Delaware and Shawano originated in a dispute between two children concerning a grasshopper. The Crows themselves, according to their own story, separated from their kinsmen, the Hidatsa, or Minitari, on the Missouri, for a reason precisely like that of the Kiowa tradition a quarrel between two chiefs over the proper division of a buf falo. A similar story is related to account for the origin of one of the bands of the Dakota. Among wandering hunters disputes in regard to the possession or division of game have always been the most potent causes of separations and tribal wars. In regard to the dissatisfied band that went to the north, the Kiowa have a fixed belief that their lost kindred (those who went away dissatisfied because of the udder) are s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

Tiik Inijian Advocate. 133 Bearing on the subject of the early habitat of the tribe, it may further be stated that, while making a collection among the Kiowas a few years ago, a small cradle was obtained from them which is essentially different from any now in use among the Kiowa or any other of the well-known prairie tribes, in that the buckskin covering is attached directly to a solid board back, which is elaborately carved and painted in the style characteristic of the tribes of the Columbia and the northwest coast. On asking the old woman who made it, where she had obtained the idea, she replied that it was the kind the Kiowas used to make a very long time ago. On showing it afterward to Dr. Washington Matthews, the dis tinguished ethnologist and anatomist, he expressed he opin ion that such a cradle would produce a flattened skull. It is now in the National Museum at Washington. To or ConlJHiird. To thk Catholic Church, her Divine founder, Jesus Christ, has entrusted the duty o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

134 The Indian Advocate. at TlTTfr 1! Catholic Kentuckv II : ? t ft If you walk to-day upon the broad, undulating Kentucky fields, beholding on all sides churches, schools, houses, cities, towns and villages, you feel instinctively bound to recall the past its toils, its struggles, its hopes and tears and prayers. The broad fields are about us, but other hands made them possible. Church windows flash in the setting sun, but once there were no churches; peaceful convents gleam across the wide meadows, but other lives were consecrated toward fash ioning these. Everywhere is peace, life, plenty. The old civilization has passed away The new is with us; yet the old shaped the new, and, if we look back to it through the mellow haze of years, how beautiful it was! How full of toil, and prayer and strength! Beholding its purity, endeavor and self sacrifice, we can but feel these shapets of the new were holy and their work a blessed one. Beginning in the twilight, they laid the foundation fo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

vv N. Tiik Indian Advocatc. 135 Father Marquette remains. On July 5, 1673, he reached the mouth of the Ohio, the Indian name of which was Ouabous kigon, in company with Joliet and five others. In his account he states that the region to the east, through which the Oua bouskigon flowed was thickly settled by the Chaounons (Shaw anese, or Shawnees); so thickly, indeed, that they numbered twenty-three villages in one district and in another fifteen. Nearly a hundred years passed, and after Father Marquette, came Daniel Boone and his companions. It will never, prob ably, be known beyond a doubt what faith Boone held, or whether or not he held to any. It is certain that his ancestors were among the original Catholic settlers which came over in the Ark and the Dove with Lord 'Baltimore's colony, although he himself was born in Pennsylvania and came into Kentucky from North Carolina in 1769. It may be truly said of Maryland that she was the mother of Kentucky Catholicity. Unquestionably Ca...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

136 Tiik Indian Advocate. Creek Settlement, in Nelson county. In 1786 came another group from Maryland, settling likewise in Nelson county and known afterward as the Hardin Creek settlement; in 1787, Cartwright's Creek; in 1788, Rolling Fork; in 1790, that of Breckinridge county; that of Cox's Creek in 1795. Thus within ten years had Maryland, mother of civil and religious liberty, thrown forward into the new territory eight distinct waves destined to spread into thousands of Christian homes and fill every valley with the laughter of happy Catholic child hood. These were days of toil and self-denial. Forests were felled, houses were builded, fields cleared. Life was straight, and hard and narrow, but their faith was great. They loved God, and trusted that He would bless them. In the fall of 1787 a priest came among them, Father Whelan, an Irish Fran ciscan. It had been their desire that one should accompany them at first, but Bishop Carroll had not one to spare. Father Whelan was su...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

Thk Indian Advocate. 137 f pense of time and muscle by two men sawing it out of the na tive tree with a common cross-cut saw. The implements of agriculture were extremely primitive. Oxen were invariably used in breaking the virgin soil, hitched to a ponderous wooden plow, the mould-board of which was of wood tipped with a thin plate of iron. Not infrequently hoes alone were used in preparing the earth for the crop of cotton, flax, hemp, corn, tobacco or potatoes. Wild game was plentiful, and venison was fortunately nutritious and abundant. Thus began the Catholic pioneers of Kentucky. Little by little small "open ings" were made in the forest. The "settlements" grew into small villages, with more, or less trade at the rude country stores, young men and women were married, and little chil dren played in the dooryards. If their lives were narrow and provincial, compared to ours, these people knew it not. They were content, and contentment with their lot is pre-eminently a characterist...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

138 The Indian Advocate. depths of the wilderness they followed the flocks of their Mas ter lest some might fall among wolves. These men were fathers among their children, and the generation they trained showed evidence of their work. Churches arose everywhere, and homes; and little by little, schools wherein the rising gen eration could be educated. The fields had widened, and the land gave promise of becoming that Arcadia it is to-day. Some of the more prominent schools founded between the admission of the State into the Union and 1825 may be briefly mentioned here, since in every instance these have wielded a tremendous influence upon the status of Southern Catholicism. Here it may not be amiss to state a-noteworthy fact, viz: that Catholicism at the South has always been distinctly, if not distinctively, intellectual. The Church in the South has been pre-eminently an intellectual force at periods when the lit erary instinct of that section was stagnant. It was Southern Catholici...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

Til r. Indian Advocajk. 139 Nevertheless, here came the barefooted boys and girls from miles around. Soon an assistant became necessary, and was found in Miss Christine Stuart, who, like Miss Rhodes, was pious and unworldly. Thus the school grew. Later the young women desired to take vows. Consultation with Bishop Flaget decided that they should be allowed to form themselves into a new community. On the 29th of June, 1812, six pious young women were received as novices. On the same even ing the first tree was felled for the erection of a new convent. Soon, with, the aid of liberal contributions, the new edifice began to rise. Small stones were brought from the bed of the creek and the foundation laid, being made solid with a filling of mud and straw. Father Nerinckx, it is related, was the chief mason on this occasion, doing this labor with his own hands. Besides the house for the novices, a chapel hewn out of logs was built, and a small house intended as a pastor's residence. This ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

140 The Indian Advocate. of St. Vincent de Paul, drawn up for the Daughters of Charity of France. Ever since, the Order has been known by the. simple title of Sisters of Charity. Nazareth has grown into an establishment of vast propor tions. In 1822 it purchased a new location two and one-half miles north of Bardstown, and building upon it, removed thither. This is the Nazareth of the present day, enlarged, improved, and flourishing. Here have been educated some of the most distinguished women of America. Here Henry Clay sent his daughter and great-granddaughter. Here studied the daughters of Benjamin Winchester, John J. Crittenden, Pres ident Zachary Taylor, Jefferson Davis, Gdorge D. Prentice, the poet, Governor Wickliffe, and scores of others. Here Orestes A. Bronson visited, and here the world-renowned Mary Anderson was educated. It is a splendid record. But the peaceful community of Nazareth has another record of which it is tenderly proud. When the cholera was epidemic in 1833...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

fi The Indian Advocate. 141 charge the delegation of four sisters was placed. The first branch was located in Bardstown, and is the Bethlehem of the present day. Sister Angela, it is told, was a lover of poverty and a most indefatigable toiler. Long before daybreak she was up and at work at her household duties, which were many and severe. At first the sisters were very poor. On the land which they purchased a plain log house was erected. Near by was the old log church of Sacred Heart, now replaced by a spacious edifice of brick. The first years of the sisters' stay were years of toil. They labored in the garden and in the fields with their own hands, although most of them were gently reared, as young ladies were reared in the South in those days. They were not able to employ an overseer, and the Mother Superior was herself obliged to direct the men at work. Yet pupils came to them from far and near from Texas, Alabama, Louisiana, Virginia, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and Missouri. The ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

142 The Indian Advocate. rugged. Now Kentucky smiles as a garden. Other- schools; other convents, other sisterhoods have come into the field, yet these remain, holy, ancient and of mellow memories. To these fitly may be added, of male schools, St.'Mary's College, St. Joseph's and Cecilian. Here, too, may be mentioned the Trappist Abbey of Gethsemane. As stated previously, the Trappists first came to the State in 1804, remaining only a short time. In 1847 another colony came from Saint Melle ray, near Nantes, France. It had already purchased sixteen hundred acres of desolate, unfruitful land in Nelson county, formerly owned by the Sisters of Loretto, who had builded a house and sought to establish a branch there. Within six years a transformation was wrought. A stately pile of build ings took the place of the plain wooden r.ionastery. Under the skillful manual labor of the monks, the waste land became productive and took on the appearance of a garden. The . Abbey itself is an inspiri...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

The Indian Advocate. 143 sale in Germany. Like "Sister Dolprosa," in which Loretto was sketched, "White Cowl" is accurate only in scenic descrip tion, its supposed facts never having had an existence. It is only a piece of romantic fiction, and was so intended by the author. There is little need to prolong further this record of the Chi;rch in Kentucky. And, thanks to such unselfish, exem plary and nobly apostolic Bishops and priests as Flaget, David, Spalding, Badin, Nerinckx, Abell, Durbin, and hun dreds like- them, it is a record of which Kentucky Catholics need not be ashamed. These went forth into the wilderness and behold the result: In 1785. there were 125 Catholics in the State; in 1893 there were 155,450. In 1785 there was not a Catholic church in Kentucky; in 1893 there were 257 churches and chapels. There was not a priest in the State in 1785: lastyear there were two Bishops and 286 priests. When Maryland gave to Kentucky her' first Catholic settlements in 1785, there wer...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1902

The Indian Advocate. 144 - Scholastic Population of Oklahoma. :: - J.....,..:?..........,...,..,,.., ,i The new school enumeration of the Territory, lately com pleted, shows the number of school children in Oklahoma to be 146,049, a gain of 18,128 for the year. The receipts from rental of Territorial school land for the last six months were $135,825, which will be divided among the various school districts, and which will amount to 93 cents per capita of 'school population. The population of each county and the share of school money is as follows: County. Scholnrs. Amount. Beaver 1,047 $ 973-71 Blaine .'. . 3,455 3.2I3.I5 Canadian 5.578 5,18754 Cleveland 6,722 6,251.46 Custer 3.059 3,681.87 Day 1,138 1,058.34 Dewey 3,570 3,320.10 Garfield 7.418 6,898.74 Grant 5.912 5,498.16 Greer 9,295 8,644.35 Kay 6,753 6,289.29 Kingfisher.... 6,970 6,482.10 Lincoln 9,676 8,997.68 County. Logan Noble Oklahoma. . . . Pawnee , Payne Pottawatomie. Roger Mills. . , Washita Woods Woodward . . . Scholar....

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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