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Title: Day Book, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 66,432 items from Day Book, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

& r THE TRUTH AND THE CHRISTMAS DAY BOOK The main purpose df The-Day1" Book" is to tell the people the truth. To be able to tell the truth, The Day Book must be free. To be free it must not be under obbgatio'n to anybo'dy but its subscribers.'-- - -v Therefore it does 'not and will not accept advertising. The result is that the richest and most influential man in Chi cago doesn'tmean Sny ;m6re tb The Day Book than the poorest. All anybody,, under any circumstances' can iand The Day Book is the price of subscription. ' Ttiat puts them all on the same plane. But the object of this statement was' to tell jthe truth about The Day Book especially this Christmas issue. While "it is the Christmas edition, and for that reason is dated December 25, it was; prjnte'd Saturday, December 23, 'and delivered to subscribers at tha same, time as the Saturday issue. If it had been Vreg'ylar newspaper we might have printed a lot of news with telegraphic dates,of December 25, and had the carriers' ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

mjmmmmmmmmm & . - , THE BEST GIFT OF ALL - By Cynthia Grey 'sic It matters little whether our Christmas gifts are many and costly, or paltry and few. Beautiful presents will not' make us happy, nor will the lack of remembrances make us sad. However wealthy or poor we are, and how circumstanced in life, but ofte thing in the world can make our Yuletide rich and full of joy, and that is the godlike presence of the Christmas spirit. " The Christmas-spirit is the greatest gift of the Yuletide. "And, like sunshine and air, it is free to all alike. It knocks at everyone's door. To us who bid it welcome, it is a fajry godmother . Its magic touch transforms our meanness into kindness, our stinginess into .generosity, and our selfishness into love. It makes us forget our hatred, our misunderstanding and our differences. It brings us arid those dear ones estranged from us together in good .will and cheer. It makes us sympathetic, charitable, forgiving, forgetful of self, and. filled with ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

HOW-THE-ECHO OF WANT COMES IN THE FORM OF MINOR MISDEMEANOR .Gaunt hunger and grim desola tion are stalking hand in hand through Chicago, and with their grisly touch comes want and suf fering , ( , Last' week's severe 'storm, with its. attendant cold' and piercing off-lake wind, usher.ed in upon the poor of the city, privation and a reign of terror has gripped the needy. The different charity organiza-' tions have felt the effects in add ed applications for help; Hull House with its finger on the pulse- of poverty, has felt the throb of pain, and the settlement workers have redoubled their ef forts tb.ward relief;. the increase of robberies and petty crime throughout the city is an echo of want among the destitute, and the municipal courts are temper ing justice with mercy, realizing thesoUrce of much of the wrongdoing.- The number of men who ac tually try to break into jail was never so great before; men who shatter a window, or commit some minor misdemeanor in or der to be sent to...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

You are probably amazed, as tounded, that such things hap pen; but the judge had heard such appeals before; he knew the suf fering and trouble tljat lay back of .the unemotional words. He knew that a great fight had gqrie on within the man's breast before he. could bring himself to the point of requesting a jail term. In his halting way the man told the judge that his name was Martin Fisher, and that' he spoke Polish, ,havihg been in this coun try but a few months. Judge Uh lir also speaks Polish, and ques tioned Martin in that language. That simplified matters, and the man told his story, the words tumbling over themselves as he rushed along in his harsh, native tongue. Here is his story r "My name is Martm Fisher. I have only been here a short time, and have been living at 1034 W. 18th street. I obtained work. Then I started to go to night school and study. I knew that I must be able to speak the lan guage' easily to get along in this big, new America. I.was making progress. I was...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

"real spirit of Christmas." But this is the Christmas spirit that prevails in thousands of hearts today a mockery and a meaningless phrase. You .have to see these things to feel them, to realize the appeal and the heartbreak in them. ,Words can't convey,, the- atmos phere. You have done your Chri5tmas "duty." You have made your gifts, wished all you ,met a" "Mer ry Christmas " and have thought in a careless way of "Peace on earth, good will to men," the words of the Savior. But remember , that he also said, in answer to the question: "Am I my brother's keeper?" "Go ye into the highways and byways, that ye may search out and comfort the weak and un fortunate." Think it over. HOW'TO EAT A CHRISTMAS DINNER Eat, Drink and Be Merry, But Also Be Moderate. . . Chew for "Dear Life. ., Beware of Plum Pudding. x v And Cap Your Yuletide Feast 'With A Long Walk.- By W. C. Cotton, M. D. Christmas dinner is a dangex- ous thing: If - it is the conven tional Christmas dinner of turkey and stuffing ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

most indigestible things that a man ever concocted as a test for his stomach. - Drink a demitasse df coffee if anything and your Christmas dinner will be well over. If you have followed directions you wont suffer much. Then get out and take a long Walk. Don't sit around all the afternoon in a poorly ventilated room. That will induce indiges tion even when great care has been taken with the actual pro cess of eating. Chew each mouthful 33 times. o o "Glory to' God in the Highest" means joy among men oh the earth. It looks funny to see Mother give Father a corset-cover, o a ILyJiiiillMH Although the successful ball player is above the' average in intelligence, the "best of them are superstitious as a maiden aunt. Chief Bender, the brainy Indian pifcher of "the Athletics, never throws to anyone save Ira Thomas, when warming up. Rather than pitch to another, or to the first baseman, he jugglefe the ball until Thomas has donnecj shin guards and protector. Ty Cobb always swings three bats...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

THE REGENERATION OF THE BIG BOSS The talk had turned to the gen tler sex, as it will when two or three men get together in sobriety and tobacco smoke, and Jack Phillips, being twenty-one, and, therefore, full of pure wisdom, had explained bitterly that wo men we're a snare and a delusion, and not worth a moment of a man's thoughts. "Hark at him!" said Big Jim Stearns, superintendent of the Illinois division of the C, L. & Y. "Hark at him! "And.him twenty one years old! Has Edith Mar tin turned her face from you, Jack?"' Phillips turned red, and then explained with some heat: "'Tis not because (of Edith Martin, nor any other fickle jade that I havecome to the cpnclu sion. I have thought the whole matter out, and satisfied my mind, which is more important than the body." Stearns laughed. "I remember a man," he said, "who was more set against woman than you are, Jack Phil lips. And now they tell me he can't turn around without paying "bills for college educations, and perambulators...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

.a ;i ftie Big Boss buttoned "his coat and climbed to the platform of the way station to fire the man re sponsible for the delay. The sta tion agent, who was a little piece of a man, with a red head of harr and a tuft of a beard, explained how things were. "The Big Boss gave his views on snowshdes and on Montana; and on the little station agent. He seemed to he holding the sta tion agent personally "responsible for having allowed snow or win ter to come near the trades of the C, L. & Y. Af the end of it, he inquired how long His tram was to be held up. The little station agent ex plained, none too gently, for he had been ruffled by what the old man had said, having red hair and not being used to the ways of gen eral managers, that "if we were lucky" we might be moving" in - ten hours. - "I remember what the Big Boss said yet Twas such an ota tion as a man is not privileged to hear but once in his life. It dealt with the landscape, and Montana, and the snow, and the deficien cies...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

-" 'Itll.be going back to die gen eral manager first,' says I; 'for I need my job. ButTll'be back.' r "The face of the general man ager was the face, of a man who had put his teeth throngh a cock roach concealed in a bun; when.I delivered the girl's message to him. . , . I . " 'Apologize; is it?' he says. 'I'll see.about that,' and he "buttons up his coafTand tramps up to the cabin, the door of which was closed. . ' a 'Farley!' shouts theBig Boss, from the outside. . ' -" 'Yes,'says the voice of the lit tle red-headed man, very meek, indee'd. " 'I want to come in,', says the Big Boss. v i " ' "'You can, and welcqme when -you, apologize to father,' says the voice of the girl. " 'Farley, you're fired !''says the Big . Boss. 'You can draw a month'-s pay in lieu of notice, for your resignation takes place from this very minute.' "There was silence for a few minutes in the cabin; and then Farley's voice, as meek as a mock turtle's, says : 'Very well, sir.' 'The old man danced out there f...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

be well looked after if he -comes up here.' "I went to the general manager and told him, and he sat up and swore most amazingly. .He said I was a disgrace to the C, X.. & Y, and that the girl was without a heart. , 'About half an hour later, I heard our bold general manager drop off his car, and go toward the cabin, softly like, as if he did not want to waken me. I follow ed him, in the fear that-he would do harm to the girl o"r her father in his rage. N "There still was a light in the cabin, arid'Miss Mary Farley still was darriing the same hole in the same sock. The Big Boss stood outside. " 'Miss Farley say he. " 'Yes,' says she. "'Where is your father?' says he." x " 'I think he's asleep,' says she. " 'I want to tell him howv sorry I am .that I let my temper gef away from me,' says our bold general manager. N " 'And for why are you stand ing out there in the cold?' says she. 'The door is unlatched, and all strangers are welcome to our poor home.' "The next time I looked up a...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

WHEN SAINT NICOLAS FILLS BOOTS IN FRANCE On Christmas eve the chUdfen in northern France are eagerly watching for the arrival of Saint Nicolas, their good friend and patron. . - They have already placed on the window sill .a dish of water and a bunch of hay for the ass which Saint Nicolas Tides ,when he goes his rounds from house to house. They await his coming assembled with theii mothers, and fathers, and uncles and aunts 'in the warm and .cosy parlor Unlike our Santa, Sajnt Nicolas 'does not come in secret, but visits in person each little boy and girl'. He arrives at 'the house laden with a huge bag, which he sets down at his feet and then, awful moment, he begins to question each child about his conduct. He seems very well informed and it is best to confess at once if one has been naughty, for though he appeal's cross and vexed when he finds a bad-child, he readjly forgives' -those who promise to do better. The good children he praises and caresses, but the others he threatens ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

OSGAR UND ADOLF'S YULETIDE FUN 'ADOfy OS?AK, LlsreN DGVR LlTTCe ' WQUSlTiVe SbtocX HA NEvBRseeN'S4W7 claus. why OSOeSNT ons ot Y0O v f WJ&W jt&U mS i . 4)R6$S UP SO He QW Sire HOW AHTA QLAKJS IfiOKSZ On the night before Christmas Miss Dillpickles' hint By Psgar und "Adolf is praised without .stint. (Continued) ' CHRISTMAS CARDS It is estimated that over 150. 000,000 Christmas cards will be sent through the mails in this country These cards placed -Jfc5f enp. to ena, wouia reach across the con tinent three times. The custom of sending Christmas cards was or iginated by W. C. T. Dobson, an English artist, in 1844. He decor ated a little card with an-appropriate scene and text and sent it to a friend, who showed it to oth er friends. It aroused.such inter est that-the next year he sent out many cards. In five years-the ens tome was'general. ,U.S. Comptroller Murray re ports that, the banking power of the nation is 21 billion 330 mill ion dollars.

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

OSGAR UND ADOLF'S YULETIDE FUN I Foxy Osgar then gets him a Yuletide disguise And "Inquisitive Edwin" he. seeks to surprise. (Continued) ' o o for that little OPTIMISM All thing work together good. Christmas -means boys will get their ears mussed,up with pie, and this means a boom in the soap market. " Any reaK healthy little boy is pretty sure to tip .the gravy over. This means business for the laundry. SB? Sometimes it means spankings and spankings were out pants, thereby encouraging the clothing merchant. Grandma is likely to break a tooth on a b'one, thereby stimu lating the dental trade. And an assortment of'stomacK aches means a donation to the .doctor. Some generous parent may give his daughter away and this is apt to make business for the lawyer. i i MflMMMAMMAMfliaiflMa

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

PPPPH-" t, v OSGAR UND ADOLF'S YULETIDE FUN 3 fI ' When Osgar emerges, the innocent child Is readily by his appearance beguilded. (.Continued) 'THE MISTLETOE The mistletoe has had differ ent significances at different times and in different a countries, but its ft fik general significance vj JSKip ... .lT-- i.. 1 iV.?2 in inis ijuiiu y uaa been, that whenever a girl chances to stand under the mistletoe a vounff man h?s the right to claim a kiss to her. The Druids regarded the mis tletoe as a very sacred symbol. They went forth to gather it with great ceremonies. There is a tra dition tha't the maid who is not kissed under the mistletoe at Christmas wjlj noC be married' during the oiext year. ,. v 41 Db, not say: "Christmas comes but once a year." Say "There is 'no vear without Christmas." "

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

OSGAR UND ADOLF'S YULETIDE FUN - itlinrniiir-iiiii mfcii .a I ft vi I,.. ii i .) But lo ! and alas ! while one the tot awes, Opposition arrives to the first Santa Claus! (Continued) o o BIRDS' CHRISTMAS A traveler jn Sweden tells of a pretty custom that he saw there. "Not a "peasant will sit down with his, children to a Christ mas dinner Tnthev; house until he has nVs,t raised aloft a Christmas dinnerJor for the little birds v that livein the cold andsnow out-Side." v?r r v J . IN OLD VIRGINIA 'Amid, rayne, winde, frost and snow, among savages, wJ " were merfy with oysters, fishj fleshrwild fowl and good bred, nor never ,had better fires in England." From. Diary,, of Capt. John Smith. Reported that Taft doesn't want '"Sunny Jim" Sherman for a running mate. Wow ! here's an opening for W. Randolph Hearil!

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

ft I) seP'ss'yTf'yg sjiiT1 iir OSGARUND-ADOLF'S-YULETIDE FUN Sic Like bums that both work the same side of the street The nvals look daggers the moment they meet. (Continued) DON'T BURN YOURSELF TO DEATH without consulting inspector. Use. asbestos fiber to represent Snow. Use metallic tinsel on tree.- Keepsmokers away from the tree. Blow QUt candles before remov ing things. from tree. If pa must be a Santa Claus have.a bucket of water handy foe use if his cotton clothes catch fire. Do not decorate your Christ mas tree with paper, cotton or flimsy material. Do not use cotton to represent snow. Do notpermit children to light candles. Do not leave matches within children's reach. Do not place tree near window cuf tains or gas jet. Do not change electric wiring

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

OSGAR UND ADOLF'S YULETIDE FUN ' So this Christmas encounter winds up in a fight, In a clinch they depart without saying "Good Night." (THE END) o o THE YULE LOG The burning of the Yule log was for many' years, and stiU'is, a great part of the Christmas ceremony in England and Am erica. It came orig inally from Scanda navia. With great ceremony the great log was rolled to the fireplace, while young and old sang songs of joy, made wishes and. danced. In England it was the custom to save a brand from the last Yule log to light the present one with. Many superstitions were con nected with the yule log. It was supposed that if-it went out dur ing the night it was a portent of bad luck, There is no gift of frankin- cense as fragrant as "a loving heart offered freely to the need of man.

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

tiBiB;-s.a,?Mcr,i i .. yg 5tt t . if J JtSJ-lff". 96, ALONE, HEARING ALIEN TONGUE, MADAME DREAMS OF NAPOLEON AND DAYS OF LONG AGO San Francisco, Cal., Dec. 25. Kinety-six years old, alone among her "two hundred odd old companions, hearing always an alien tongue she does -nob under stand, little, -frail t old- Mme. Jeanne Del.!Couche,'is",thte-,oldest, saddest inmate otx the Relief home. Madame: ;even- at th'eRelief home whete" dtill-eye"d inmates, their sordid pasts covered for- Madame. ever, are called brusuely "by their last names Mme. De Louche, by the old women she does not un derstand, is called "Madame." It is the last little touch of re aspect. It sets Madame in a place apart. If she were conscious of it, wrapped in her little world of past memories, it might add a touch of comfort to the long, coloFless days. Madame has been at the Relief hQme three years. 3Qien you ask Jier why she came, she shrugs her little thin shoulders and a look of pain comes into her dark eyes the ey...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

GL, -v fo Generally it is the bleacherite. who enlivens the ball gamewith his utterances, more or less hu morous, or sarcastic. Some of the things hurled "at the players, as they go to bat, are worth repeti tion. Usually they are a play up on the individual's name. Knight "Good rfight." Goode "Be sure and deliver of sport." Tinked "Now is the time to mix things up, Joe." Chance "Come on Frank, old boy, here's your chance." Cobb "You can tie Lajoie, butan't'Ty' Cobb.' Jackson "Oh you stonewall." Wood "Take you time and put the timber to it, "Joe." Lake "No wonder you're a, good spit bailer, with that-name." SStahl "Show 'em you're not four-flushing, Jake." ! Wilson "Here's' Wilson that's all." N Burns "They don't come too hot for you Bill." Wheat "Oh you breakfast food!' . Karie "Come on Johnny, do a little cutting up!" "Dalton "Have a care, Jack Dalton." v ' Moore "You've done enough for one day. Cole "All hail the king." Leever "Chuck it into the a i fr KJuJy t ri "J high, 'Sam." "...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 25 December 1911

MIQqWOTIVMMMHMi ( v - , CHRISTMAS. CANDIES p -". , Sugared Popcorn Two quarts popped corn, 2 tablespoons but ter, 2 cups brown sugar, 1-2 cup water. Put butter in saucepan and when it is melted addvthe su gar and water. Let boil 6 min utes. Pour over popped corn, stirring until every kernel is well-coated. Maple Caramels Break two pounds of maple sugar "into a quart of milk, and boil steadily until a little dropped into cold water will harden. Then pour in greased pans, and before entirely cool, mark off into squares. Half cream instead of the quart of milk makes richer candy: Molasses Candy Two cups molasses, 2-3 cups sugar, 3 table spoons butter, 1 tablespoon vine gar. Put butter in the kettle and when melted add molasses and sugar. Boil until when poured in cold water mixture becomes brittle. Add vinegar just before taking from fire. Pour on well buttered plate and when cool enough to handle, pull until por ous and light colored, allowing candy to come in contact with tips of fin...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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