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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1906

ifattfpßkJ issued First and Fifteenth of Month j lv The Ranch Publishing Corporation Miller Freeman, Editor and Manager. Associate Editors: ■P £. Axling *• Walden H. li. Blanchard Chicago Representatives: Allen ft Ward, Boyce Building Office: IM Colman Building, Seattle. Subscription: In advance, one year 50 cents; six months, 30 cents. Seattle subscriber* are required to pay $1.00 per year, on account of local postage. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be noti tied in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not •mswer, as we cannot find it on our list irom the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and address, ana ■ ill arrearages or dues must be paid a« required by law. Date of expiration Is shown on your paper by address label containing your name. Failing to receive the paper regularly, you should notify the Seattle office at once, w...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1906

4 HORTICULTURE F. WALDEN SOME of the Cali fornia fruit grow ers, as shown in their fruit papers, recommend "thin ning by pruning." This is said to be especially applica ble to peaches. J. W. Mills, of Pomo na, Calif., has a timely article in the California Cultivator on this sub ject. He first lays down the well rec ognized rule "that a tree will properly develop a certain amount of fruit and it makes no difference whether it is evenly distributed or not." This rule in principle I have insisted on fre quently. A bearing tree is capable of bringing to maturity a certain amount of fruit. When a tree, therefore, has all its fruit in the top, for instance, and none on the lower limbs, the clus ters may be allowed much thicker than if the whole tree was loaded heavily. Mr. Mills recommends as one way of thinning peaches to "go in with the hand shears and cut back the small fruit-bearing wood so that the fruit is properly thinned thereby." Some peach trees were thinned in the usual way by...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1906

from the standpoint of the practical grower, and not from some office in * • • This blunder of Mr. Irwin was re ferred to Prof. Steadman, entomolo gist of the Missouri experiment sta tion, and his reply to this reckless statement is: "Plenty of codling moth to be found in orchards during the winter, especially if the orchard be in grass or sod or weeds. But un fortunately Prof. Steadman makes the following statement: "To be sure, most codling moth larvae that are to pass the winter are in apples when they are picked and put into storage." That is very far from being true with us. Here the larvae stop pupating before the middle of September; we pick our winter apples from the first of October up to the middle of No vember —not many after the first of November. What becomes of all the worms that leave the apples during this period of one or two months? They winter somewhere in the orchard un less they are caught by birds or meet with some other mishap. We have opened and examined hund...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1906

6 POULTRY ———— H. I*. Ml. AN< II A HI) Bowel Trouble in Chicks. A poultry raiser asks what is the cause of bowel trouble in little chicks and how it can be avoided. The editor wishes he knew and could tell exactly what is the cause —but he can't. The young of every animal seems subject to a form of diarrhea which is nearly always fatal. It has been suggested that the white scours of colts and calves is of the same char acter as the white diarrhea in chick ens. We can only give some of the causes of tais trouble. What the spe cial cause is in each case can only be intelligently surmised by one on the spot. If the eggs have been overheated or chilled in the incubator, or surrounded by foul air during the period of incu bation, the vitality of the chick is les sened and it is more susceptible to disease of every kind. If the air of the brooder is bad, the chicks will be subject.to disease. If the brooder heat runs down below 90 the first five days of the chick's life the yolk will n...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1906

6 POULTRY ———— H. 1,. BLANCHAKD Bowel Trouble in Chicks. A poultry raiser asks what, is the cause of bowel trouble in little chicks and how it can be avoided. The editor wishes he knew and could tell exactly what is the cause —but he can't. The young of every animal seems subject to a form of diarrhea which is nearly always fatal. It has been suggested that the white scours of colts and calves is of the same char acter as the white diarrhea in chick ens. We can only give some of the causes of tnis trouble. What the spe cial cause is in each case can only be intelligently surmised by one on the spot. If the eggs have been overheated or chilled in the incubator, or surrounded by foul air during the period of incu bation, the vitality of the chick is les sened and it is more susceptible to disease of every kind. If the air of the brooder is bad, the chicks will be subject.to disease. If the brooder heat runs down below 90 the first five days of the chick's life the yolk will not be abs...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1906

t Mafthoid § A Roofing § En Twenty two years of practical 5? M experience goes into every roll of - f^ ■ roofing we make. Mulihoid is a £& ■ -*•'. roofing you can depend upon for "3T ■. ■- long-lasting durability—it \vi I resist $2 I fire and keep out the cold, wind and M It is easier to lay than a carpet W M and as full directions are co'itaincd (fjs Sl in each roll any one can apply it ***. n^ quickly. Send for booklet. Hk The Paraffine Paint «g> lly San Francisco • Portland : Seattle «tk Spokane : Denv.r : An reles Mk , New Orleans : Dallas, Texas ' W w. li. Bhoadoß, Northwest Agent, 408 Occidental At., Seattle. *£$&£ TOO^HAHMEREK. y^^^^^OjATtnt^^xE FOR " ~"NoJ2 3dATe.A, l ca^^^ - PEAT LAND FOR POTATOES. A correspondent wrote: "I have about five acres of peat land, well tiled, so situated that I cannot use it for pasture. Thought of planting it to potatoes. How would potatoes do on that land? Should it be manured; and if so, with what kind of manure? How will that kind...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1906

i Roofing § Bf Twenty two years of practical j|? V experience goes into every roll. of ' ©i ■ roofing we make. Malitioid is a «12) ■ ' roofing you can depend ujion for X £ long-lasting durability—it \vi I resist • w I :'.'". fire and keep out the cold, wind and ■£c ■ .. It is easier to lay than a carpet ; ' w ■ • and as full directions are contained* M in each roll anyone can apply it gj*. quickly. Send for booklet. *** The Paraffine Paint £$ * %■• C/ IXID cL IT y^ San Francisco • Portland : Seattle at% ; -Spokane : Deny. r : '.os Anreles : mk ; New Orleans : ; Dallas, Texas ' ■f0 W. li. Rhoafles, Northwest Agent, 408 Occidental A y., Seattle. rsiiif^Wl*^ «** te f°r PEAT LAND FOR POTATOES. A correspondent wrote: "I have about five acres of peat land, well tiled, so situated that I cannot use it for pasture. Thought of planting it to potatoes. How would potatoes do on that land? Should it be manured; and if so, with what kind of manure? How will that kind of land do for timothy?" The...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1906

8 THE DAIRY The Silo from Dairyman's Standpoint. The silo is without doubt the factor that will to a greater extent reduce the cost of milk and fat. than any other ap pliance or system known to the dairy men of today. The best proof we have that the silo is a "winner" is the fact that not more than five men in a thou sand who build one and feed silage one season, conclude they have made ft mistake and undertake to continue their business without its use. Life is too short to demonstrate the worth of each particular method that may be adopted in our business, hence it is wisdom on our part to conclude that, where the evidence is so over whelmingly favorable as it is to the silo it must be all right; and the proper thing to do is to fall into line, build a silo, strive to produce first class silage, study the methods of suc cessful dairymen and produce butter fat at a cost that will leave a satisfac tory profit. An abundance of good silage enables the dairyman to offer his cows a rati...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1906

chooses that which has the right aro ma and flavor. Buttermaking is a science and the private dairyman must use scientific methods in the manufacture of the golden bricks if he would compete with the creameries in the sale of his product. Individuality of Cows. Everyone knows that one cow will give a different amount of milk than another on the same feed. But a great many do not seem to realize that the same difference exists in their capacity for eating, their taste for different feeds, their behavior, etc. As much difference exists between cows in every respect as between peo ple. But what do you do? Feed and care for them all alike, and wonder why some do not do well. Some cows like bran better than others and make use of more of It. Some do not like rape, some refuse gluten. We had a young cow that wouldn't eat corn. Some are hoggish with certain feeds and not with oth ers. Some behave quietly at all times, some seem to lose their temper on certain days and they are ugly to ev e...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1906

10 HOUSEHOLD How to Make Nut Bread. ( Mrs. C. K. Hisser.) Oii<> iiint of White flour, two and one-half quarts of whole wheat flour, one pint of water, one pint of milk. one tablespoon shortening, two table spoons sugar, one tablespoon salt, two cups English walnuts, two cakes com pressed jreast. Measure the flour by tossing lightly from the scoop into the measuring cup. When the measure is filled by forcing in flour, the amount will be Increased and result is too stiff a dough. Warm the flour if cold. Pour boiling water into the milk. Add BUgar, salt, and shortening. When liquid is luke warm add yeast which has been dissolved in a little warm water with a teaspoon of sugar. Stir in the white flour and about a pint of the whole wheat flour. Beat briskly for two minutes and let rise in warm place till honey combed with air bub bles. In this risen sponge, stir broken or chopped nuts as they will not cling to the si iff dough. Now add the remain der of the whole wheat flour and al...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1906

FORCING RHUBARB. One of the secrets of successful market gardening is to produce cer tain asculents in advance of what is usually termed their regular season. Rhubarb is one of those that is quite profitable when produced a little ear lier than the same can be had from the open. A method common in some localities and one that will pay here, is to open a furrow on each side of the row of roots and fill in with hot horse manure, covering again with the dirt. Then by placing a barrel or box over each crown or by running a line of boards on each side of the crowns, covering the top of barrel, box or frame with most any old thing to darken, and banking more hot manure around the outside of barrel, etc., the roots can't resist the temptation to send up the shoots, misled by your manipulations, and "forced" to believe that spring has arrived. There is an other method and one that is feasible on many truck gardens and farms, and that is growing the shoots in a cellar, cave, dugout or outbui...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1906

1" THE FIELD Grass Questions by a New Comer. H. Bkouge, ■ subscriber at Matsqui, B. C, sends The Ranch a number of questions of sreat importance to new comers. He writes: I intend to have broken up some land thlfl rammer and seed it in with clover and timothy in the fall. Soil is practically level, and is peaty, mixed with clay—old bottom of the Fraser river; big crops of slough or swamp grass and blue joint on the land. Sod is rather thick. Now. would it be best to have the breaking done about the middle of June Ito 6 inches deep, or below the sod. and plow the grass down with end of a chain Should the land be disked at once, or would it do to disk and harrow in the fall—in August or September—just before seeding? Should the ground be harrowed again after seeding, or is it all right to let the rain take care of the covering? I am a beginner, and wish to learn how this should or might be done with good results. As I have not yet got horses and implements of my own, I should have to ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1906

and clovers of this coast as compared with those of the eastern part of the country, we are unable to discover any very great difference when we consult the published tables giving the analy sis of each. In a practical way we take notice that the dairy herds of this state average up with results un surpassed by the herds of any other state. While our dairymen, in order to secure such results, are giving much attention to the question of breeding to' the dairy type, we all know that without proper feed such painstaking in the matter of breeding would largely go for naught: In the writer's opinion very little profit comes to any dairyman—be he in the east or on this coast —who feeds his cows on over-ripe timothy and clover hay. The experiment sta tions have shown that a loss of no less than from 30 to 60 per cent of tne feeding value of these grasses fol lows Improper methods of cutting and curing the same for hay. For the best quality the grasses should be cut when in full bloom, and...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1906

II LIVE STOCK Starting in the Sheep Business. Like every other business, that of sheep breeding has its ups and downs, yd ihe man who makes a start in it should stick to it through fair weather and foul, and in so doing will be surest Of success, says Henry Wallace. Our stockmen are much too fond of jump ing from one thing to another so as to keep on the high place every time. This jumping process means many bad falls. It is best to stay by the business when down, knowing that it will again rise and that the profit will in all probability offset the loss. Anyhow we have never known a stockman to suc ceed by constantly changing from one branch of the business to another, and we would advise the man who thinks of starting in with sheep to make up his mind to stay by the business and constantly endeavor to improve his an imals, his methods and his knowledge. One cannot afford to start with a large flock unless thoroughly trained as a shepherd. It is much better to si art with a score o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1906

to betheonereliable PvW\ !V I remedy for Spavin*. Ring; ■MxT^^l^^S •»•»••• Curb., Splint* »ml ■/ktNDAITS \WM all forms of lament]. ■SpwrnatPril KENDALLS SPAVIN CURE HtMTWRI VVHj^H enr»» promptly, p«ra»».otlT, wltfi ■hMtfKV mlnu. IlkboUl*. « for if. All ■ >■ ani(tflt«. C»qti»ll*J for hmlly urn. II ■« Book, XWofm on tht Bont, frw. I Ifl II Dr. B.J. KENDALL CO. g^B MSB Kne»burg>■!!«, Vrmont. up in the fall. In the case of an older horse smearing the manger with bitter drugs such as alose is helpful; also covering the front of the manger with tin or sheet iron to prevent the horse from getting hold. In some cases a roller is put in the front of the manger so that when the horse takes hold of it the teeth will'slip. A good plan where horses are confined in stalls is to put them in a box stall without any feed box, feed the hay on the floor and feed the grain out of a box or bucket, removing it immediately after the horse has finished eating. In con firmed cases the only thing to do...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1906

16 111 111 PIFCFS H \ fSi —-^ Prices reduced! Capacities in- I '*~ "^"^ul^^^ ppillli^^wri creased! Tubulars cheaper than 1 ""*•-** -** Pll&iit any Others now! Look at this: We Own The Largest Stock Food Factory la The World. Hi Pll ill y UtllCl£) uuw' UWft UIU " It covers over a city block, contains over 18 acres of floor space, cost L "3 I' ■ - IHSi $500,000. Size of our office 360x120. 300 office people. 150 typewriters WMt 111 I 111 I Mil >T , „„„,,,„ „„. T, nllr rinnrltr «54fl OO and we »se fifty million letter heads and envelopes every year A car- Xi MlltPHSull ITo-1< 200 lbS" pCr h° capacity.. $40.00 load every 30 days. Our chemical laboratory is one of the best. Our %JJgBSLMSa-!^ No. 2. 300 lbs. per hour capacity.. 55.00 office is one of the treat sights of the business world. Many very -ga „ 3 400 , bs uer hour capacity 65.00 ' . small concerns advertise lartre buildings. We invite you to visit our ,_ V I 153?^. *T tr \ rnn iv. „L(tv fi nnn factory and see that we ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1906

THE RANCH *~~ ' ' «*•-'-—-^-'"t"-^^" "^ r *''**s£"* ■*£" S^.* 'Bp' Mv Vft' "*'*?.. ••■w *" hjl ' - „ ~ "~~" _ -'■;'' '■"v'jf' y.'' '■/"/' ' '.'■ i '/■'•'•'*'•''"',',' Vol. XXIII. No. 10. Condition and Present Outlook for Fruit j WITH a view to securing a general idea of the condition of the horticultural industry through out the state of Washington The Ranch addressed a number of inquiries to the horticultural inspectors and commis sioners in charge of the inspection work. The responses were not very numerous, which is to be regretted. Those who sent in replies took an evi dent interest in the work and were glad to let the people in other sections know what their respective counties were doing and what the prospects were for the fruit crop this year. The queries sent out were as printed below, and the replies received are under the respective counties from which they came. The Ranch takes this oppor tunity of thanking those gentlemen who responded. 1. What is the approximate acreage...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1906

1 Qn^-A—TW—— I LONDON'S , — \ |o-, T co L ( ri?u^co| lu-.t.^^^col I Lq_SLPON!S I j u_ONpor>rS I I JL&NDON'S' nrl_ltl_A-i TSml^ |OI»rTCOI»SLL»«UP#V»|cO unitlo MILLS' SUM>I» CO. UNITtO MILL* WWIJtO. UNHID MILLS JumY CO. U*HTC» MILLS aum.V CO. »""" ' <Linkbhw^ls (TITTf OIL ICLOTMS lace, TAPESTRYCJURDWIS WINDOW rduCHES SEATTLE. wash jo||||L- j Imillsl | j LINOLSJMS 1 1 CURTAINS |_| iJPHOJmSoSs L| 5 IJAj^S M ~jzj^~ LI ■ Carpets, Linoleums, Mattings, iß'!sHifc.fe United Mills Supply Co. ' Camels. Linoleums. Mattinas, No. 1710—Ingrain Carpet, yard V»UI |JV/l«^s I_IIIVf>VMIIIsJS IT ■\M Ms I ivpvjj wide, block pattern. Quality, patent M 3234—Ingrain Carpet, yard to i^ askßfa |_ ace Curtains 5» ssam^as^wPas s forms part of the pattern thus giv- LU^C VUI I<JI I 1 any prJciy wool isspecially spun for Ing two extra colors in the figure; > ke^n^s usually ask $1.00 yard very showy effect and durable The 4£ TUr Dairu) , nrrnMlirunC lie for anything near this quality. Color qua...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1906

Issued First and Fifteenth of Month By The Ranch Publishing Corporation Miller Freeman, Editor and Manager. Associate Editors: P. X.. Axliugr F. Walden H. L. Blanchard Chicago Representatives: Allen & Ward, Boyce Building Office: 325-6 Colman Building, Seattle Subscription: In advance, one year 50 cents; six months, 30 cents. subscribers are required to pay $1.00 per year, on account of local postage. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be noti fied In writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find it on our list from the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and address, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expiration Is shown on your paper by address label containing your name. Failing to receive the paper regularly, you should notify the Seattle office at once, when mistakes, if ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1906

4 HORTICULTURE F. WALDKW I HAVE been spending some time on my fruit ranch giving direc tions to my sons about the manage ment of our orch ards. We have set 1,500 more peach trees this spring. These added to what we set last spring and two years ago make 4,400 set during the three springs. Two thousand and two hundred of these are Elbertas, the others consisting ot Early and Late Crawford, Champion, Foster and a few others. The Elber tas set two years ago have quite a sprinkle of fruit on them this year. Peach trees begin to bear early. In three years from the time of setting one may expect quite a crop of fruit it" the trees have been kept in good condition. * * * There is quite a revival of peach tree setting in the Pacific northwest. Will it pay to raise peaches? Yes and no. Much depends on tne loca tion. The trouble will be that many will rush into the business without studying this question of location and the result will be failure or, at best, partial failure in many cases. If...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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