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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1996

May 1996 Bliley discusses pesticides, taxes, budget with farm leaders (Continued from page 2) regulations affecting landowners in the western reaches of the state. "It's fine to save the bay, but everybody should help pay," he noted. Bill Speiden of Orange County told Bliley that Farm Bureau supports repeal of the federal estate tax. Until this is done, Farm Bureau wants to see an increase in the exemption to at least $2 million. Estate taxes shouldn't apply until after a farm is sold outside a family, Speiden said. "You're going to see a major overhaul of the tax structure in the near future," Bliley told the 30 leaders gathered at a restaurant in Gordonsville. "The estate tax is particularly onerous for people with a family business, including FACTORY OVERSTOCK! V\The 'k' model, Steel Master's perfect backyard shop . Steel Master Buildings at Factory Direct Closeout Prices! Easy Financing Available • Buy Factory Direct • Build It Yourself Call now for EREE information STcc'JiTiasT...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1996

Farm Bureau News New program philosophy, $ign-ups explained By NORM HYDE AND GREG HICKS RICHMOND—The recently passed 1996 Farm Bill was created by "Young Turk" Republican congressmen eager to cut federal program spending, a national farm policy expert said. By pleading for more planting flexibility, farmers received a farm bill that will allow them to respond to market demands, said John Keeling, deputy director of agricultural policy with the American Farm Bureau Federation. He spoke to members of the Friends of the Industry of Agriculture on April 9. Called the Federal Agricultural Improvement Act of 1996, it resembles the original Freedom to Farm Bill, which was the brainchild two years ago of House Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts, R-Kan. The legislation ends all government limits on how much and what crops to plant in exchange for a seven-year "phase-out" of direct subsidy payments to farmers. By 2002, there will only be about $4 billion in federal funding available f...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1996

May 1996 Va. peanuts make cable TV premiere By GREG HICKS VFBF Communications Director The Good Earth Peanut Co. made its debut April 27 on the QVC shopping channel that reaches 54 million households nationwide. The tasty peanuts have been available to Farm Bureau members during the organization's annual convention the past several years. Good Earth, based in the Greensville County hamlet of Skippers, is owned and operated by Lindsey Vincent and his wife Scott. Lindsey is a former VFBF assistant commodities director and a former VFBF field representative. They are members of the Prince George County Farm Bureau. The peanuts were selected after rigorous inspection and a thorough interview process during a QVCsponsored products show in Richmond Feb. 7 called "The Quest For America's Best Discovery Tour." "It gets our name out to about 80 million people," Lindsey said. "It certainly increases the name recognition of our product. We were very pleased to be chosen." The peanuts carry the...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1996

Farm Bureau News Environment-friendly practices big on farms (Continued from page 1) tractor equipment. Other BMPs include the use of grass buffer strips between crops and a waterway, terraced fields that reduce erosion during excessive rain and construction of liquid manure pools and buildings to cover livestock compost piles. Farmers can also place permanent plants along streams and fence off cattle from streams for bank erosion control. This also prevents manure-generated nitrates from entering streams and endangering aquatic life. With encouragement from the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation and other agricultural organizations, the Virginia General Assembly in March adopted a bill that encourages farmers to use BMPs. The new legislation allows a 25-percent state income tax credit for the first $70,000 a farmer spends on implementing stateapproved BMPs. The program becomes effective on jan. I, 1998. The maximum tax credit available is $ I 7,500 per farmer per tax year. However, fa...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1996

May I 996 Tobacco growers promote product in Pacific rim (Continued from page 1) hundreds of years to duplicate this combination of soil and climate throughout the world and to this point have never been successful," he noted. "Tobacco is similar to a spice. It's real sensitive to all the outside factors." Jenkins is chairman of the board of directors of Tobacco Associates, Inc., a Washington organization representing growers in Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. He traveled with Kirk Wayne, president of Tobacco Associates, and one other staff member of the organization. As U.S. growers promote their product in Asia, growers from Brazil and Zimbabwe are doing the same in Asia. Growers in Brazil and Popular farm practices protect bay By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—Most farmers surveyed by Virginia Tech said they use practices that protect soil and water. Known as Best Management Practices, these are methods of farming that include the use ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1996

Farm Bureau News Tobacco growers told not to overreact to media By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor KEYSVILLE—Keep calm in the wake of anti-tobacco media blitzes, a tobacco expert told growers in April. "In the last year or two, with the massive anti-tobacco stories in the news media and the litigation that's going on, a lot of people have overreacted," said Kirk Wayne, president of Tobacco Associates, Inc., a Washington organization representing tobacco growers. "Overreaction is not prudent for tobacco growers," he told members of the Flue-Cured Tobacco Advisory Committee. Committee members, appointed by the board of directors of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, met in Keysville on April 1. "You've been in business a long time and will continue to be in business a long time," Wayne said. "Extreme reaction is not needed from U.S. farmers," he added. Customers overseas "want to see U.S. farmers in a solid position." To assure foreign buyers they will continue to receive highqu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1996

May 1996 Trigon's new plans offer more choices to members (Continued from page 1) offering some wonderful products." Two new products, Virginia Basic and Individual Key Care, have been added to the variety of comprehensive major medical plans currently offered to Farm Bureau members. Virginia Basic is a good choice for cost-conscious members, said Tracy Stansfield, senior sales and service consultant with VFBF. It is a simple, no frills, major medical plan with low monthly premiums. Members also have the option to purchase additional benefits. Individual Key Care is a PPO, or Preferred Provider Organization, which helps control costs by managing care within a network of physicians. An in-network plan, such as Individual Key Care, offers a fixed co-payment of $20 to see a doctor within the network. With other plans, members must first satisfy a deductible before insurance will cover a percentage of the cost, she said. Two new riders allow members to customize plans to suit their need...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1996

Farm Bureau News Policy expert describes new farm bill (Continued from page 6) tainly one of the ones most targeted by the opposition to farm programs," he said. Sen. John Warner, R-Va., was a principle supporter of the peanut program in committee debate, he added. Conservation programs also received a boost in the final draft of the legislation. Keeling noted that for the first time ever, funding will be available for conservation programs for both row crop and livestock producers. "I think the conservation provisions are balanced," Keeling said. "I think they do some things that are going to help us in terms of swampbuster to clarify that. I think they will be helpful in a state like Virginia where you've got so much pressure on farmers because of the Chesapeake Bay, particularly in the livestock area." Spreading the word "We most definitely need the Farm Bureau member's help to spread the word about the new program across the state," said ... And With One Little Misstep It's All ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1996

May 1996 Promising drugs may come from tobacco leaves (Continued from page 2) Ceredase for one patient can cost $150,000 to $300,000. That's because Ceredase is extracted from human placenta, and it takes 2,000 to 8,000 to produce a single dose. Most patients need a dose twice a month. A single tobacco plant can produce a dose of the drug substitute. Like many promising drugs, this Ceredase-substitute won't reach the market anytime soon, Cramer lamented. "It will take 10 years to move this through the regulatory hurdles," she explained. Years of testing on selected patients must come first. Contests spur young farmers to succeed It's been two decades since the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Young Farmers' Committee first started recognizing young farmers for their achievements in agriculture. With the number of new farms decreasing every year, it's even more important today to get young farmers enthused about the agriculture industry. One way we're trying to accomplish that is by o...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1996

Farm Bureau News (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words in Single letters or figures and groups of figures ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. > Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 10th of each month. For the June issue, the deadline is May 10. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. (Please fill in this classified ad form and send to the Farm ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1996

May 1996 The Formers Market (Continued from page 14) Best rates, brochure. Midnight Audio, 540-948-5729. Madison. FRANKLIN PEST CONTROL — rats, mice, ants, fleas, silverfish, mosquitoes, spiders, wasps, bees, all crawling insects. 804-332-5784. BEGINNERS GINSENG — Growing Manual. Send $11.50 to: Wilson Ginseng Gardens, Box 642, Floyd, Va. 24091. CHARTER FISHING — on the Chesapeake Bay, striped bass, bluefish, mackerel. Capt. Billyi's Charters, 804-580-7292. SCHOLZ BULLDOZING — and Backhoe Service for Gloucester Mathews, West Point and local area. Brad Scholz, 804-693-5918. LAND AND HOMES — buy or sell. Call Bob Scott. Long & Foster Realtors, 540-786-8473 or 540-371-5220. NEED TO SELL — your home or farm land, call Gary Higgins at Kyle Real Estate, 540-236-6134. CUSTOM PICTURE — framing, mounting, laminating, canvas, transferring. Art and posters for sale, for less. 540-877-2840. OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACES — classic waterstove. Will provide heat for next winter. Free brochure....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1996

And You Can Choose the Program that Best Fits Your Health Insurance Needs! • Doctor Services and Office Visits • Outpatient Services • Hospitalization and Surgery • Preventive Care SZZ-R M^ Supplement Plans - The coverage offered by the Farm Bureau is to help pay the bills not covered by Medicare. The Farm Bureau offers a variety of group insurance programs for you and your employees. You choose the level of protection that best suits your companies' needs and budget. The Farm Bureau Offers a Choice of Programs for You! Call Our Toll Free Number 1-800-229-7779 Today Find Out How the Farm Bureau Can Help Solve Your Health Care Insurance Needs Coverage not available to Virginians residing in Fairfax, Arlington, Alexandria, Vienna, and the eastern half of Fairfax County. mm m Tfc T/n T The Health Care programs and policies described in this ad are products ofTrigon Blue Cross Blue Shield and its subsidiary 1m JL ■ > 1\ T\ W\ health maintenance organizations. Farm Bureau Serv...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

Farm Bureau Volume 55, Number 5 World market could pump up dairy industry By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor Global marketing of U.S. dairy products is expected to boost the sagging dairy industry, which is losing farmers by the thousands each year. Congress and President Clinton adopted a new farm program in April that continues to fund overseas marketing of U.S. dairy products, such as butter, non-fat dry milk and cheese. American ice cream and yogurt are also Asiabound. "We've got to get into the world market," said James Townsend, a King William County dairy producer. "I'm pleased with how the dairy part of the farm bill came out. I think there will be some times when we'll be disappointed. We'll have to deal with prices that are not good." bound (See State dairy, Page 12) James Townsend moves part of his herd of dairy cattle. Gypsy moth losing battle By JOHNNA MILLER VFBF Radio/Video Producer CHARLOTTESVILLE —A fungus is saving the lives of thousands of Virginia trees and w...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

Farm Bureau News Teen safety training moving closer to reality * By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor Farms could become safer for working teen-agers in the future, thanks to statewide donations for a proposed safety training program. Concerned citizens and organizations throughout Virginia have donated $36,200 for the creation of a safety training program. Teenagers who work on farms, in gardens or in orchards will receive the training, said Steve Grant, a volunteer with the Virginia Future Farmers of America Foundation. Youth safety training could begin in late 1996 or early 1997, noted Grant, chairman of the safety training program of the FFA and 4-H. He also helped coordinate the fund-raising drive. Training will be available to all young people ages 14-18. The Virginia Department of Labor and Industry enacted regulations in July 1994 that require 14and 15-year-olds to meet safety training criteria in operating tractors and other machinery. Due to state budget cuts, however, t...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

|une I 996 Farmers urged to push for property rights bill Imagine a government worker showing up at your home, inspecting one of your family vehicles and saying you can no longer drive it because it sends a negligible amount of emissions into the atmosphere. The government worker tells you that the car can never be driven again by anyone. This would essentially render the vehicle useless. No use. no re-sale. Landowners have been fighting a similar battle for a number of years as overzealous state and federal bureaucrats have rendered productive farm and timber land useless through environmental regulations, scenic preservation and so-called endangered species. Now we have a chance to correct the problem. America has already taken giant environmental steps In this election year, Americans can count on hearing a lot about the environment. The political rhetoric is enough to add to global warming. But stop a minute and ask yourself this. Farm Focus American Farm lluremt Federation Is t...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

Farm Bureau News - . fy. v;gp aftf s t| T a ' \ , n ( x [ , t v&s * H 5, vh' ,'fi' June 1: Virginia Wineries Festival, June 8-9: International Food June 17-20: Virginia State 4-H June 25: Weed Science Field Day, Great Meadows, The Plains. Call Festival, Bryce Resort, Basye. Congress, Virginia Tech, Eastern Shore Agricultural 1-800-277-CORK. Contact Bobby Myers, 540-477- Blacksburg. Call 540-231-6371. Research and Extension Center, 3286. Painter. Contact Henry Wilson, June 4: On-Farm Composting June 19: Farmers' Share Program 804-442-6411. Field Day, Albemarle County. June 8: Aquaculture water quality in Amelia, Rockingham, Frederick, Contact Archer Christian, 540- workshop, Virginia State Caroline, Montgomery, Prince June 26: Texas Festival, Kenston 231-9801. University, Etrick. Contact Dr. George and Carroll counties. Forest School, Biackstone. Contact Brian Nerrie, 804-524-5903. Sponsored by the Virginia Farm Irby Moncure at 804-292-3012. June 7-9: HARBORFEST, Town Bur...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

June 1996 Buy a new Dodge Truck and pick up a ton of cash. $500 CASH BACK TO FARM BUREAU" MEMBERS. As if our Magnum® engine series, overall the most powerful line of pickup engines on the planet, wasn't enough incentive for Farm Bureau members, now there's an extra $500 in the deal. That's $500 back on all 1996 5.9 L Magnum V-8 Ram and Ram Club Cab pickups, $500 back on all 1996 Cummins diesel-powered America's Truck Stop Ram and Ram Club Cab pickups ... and $500 back on select mid-size 1996 Dakota pickups. The offer includes all 1996 Ram Van and Ram Wagon models, too. That's on top of any other national Dodge cash back offer* All you need to do is get a certificate from your state's Farm Bureau validating that you've been a member for at least thirty days. Then stop by your Dodge dealer. Where you'll discover it pays to be in the Farm Bureau. ♦This cash back offer is valid for members of participating Farm Bureaus, expires 9/30/96, and may not be used in combination with any other ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

Farm Bureau News AN ADVERTISEMENT in the Farm Bureau News reaches 115,000 homes arid businesses across Virginia. Please call 804-784-1326 for more information. FACTORY OVERSTOCK! Steel Master buildings offer 100% usable interim space Choose from several designs with low monthly payments Steel Master Buildings at Factory Direct Closeout Prices! Easy Financing Available • Buy Factory Direct • Build It Yourself Call now for FREE information 57eelH1057er and Save Up To 50% rWTTFTJFFJTFTTT* I © 1996 SteelMoster Get The Best Night's Sleep Ever! Cant seem to find a comfortable f alignment, which can ..«w|m position? Does your back ache " w JPIIIP/ 1 lower the tension in when you awake? These are signs j surroun ding , Cnmfnrt that your mattress may not be muscles. So conmr toyQur A SrSlxmrS, } mJf Call For More Information j,i You owe it to yourself to learn more system doesn t rely on springs or mf 4 , ~ \ . . i i • r • | I about this revolutionary way to a better water, but on a cushion ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

June 1996 Two years of college could be sufficient Did you know that people who want to become managers in agriculture don't have to go to college for four years? There's a program at Virginia Tech that takes only two years to com- plete. And the majority of its graduates get jobs right away. Tech's two-year agricultural technology program is for anyone interested in mid-level management positions in agriculturalrelated fields. This fall, the oldest student enrolled is 53, according to Dr. John R. Crunkilton, associate dean and director of the two-year school. He also has signed up a dentist who wants a career change, as well as several students who already hold bachelor's degrees. "Our program is for students who are focused and know what they want," Dr. Crunkilton said. "It fills a niche." And we think it's a great program. I only wish they'd had it when I was in school! As young farmers, we're often struggling to survive. We know some students struggle financially with school. So...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1996

Farm Bureau News Today's children will be tomorrow's leaders It's been said before. But I want to say it again because it's true. If tomorrow's leaders don't understand agriculture—the state's largest industry, then the laws they make won't be fair to farmers. That's why we want to educate Americans while they are young. The Virginia Agriculture in the Classroom Program is one of the best ways we have to educate youngsters. Through the program, Fungus helps save trees (Continued from page 1) "Everybody's very excited about the prospects and there will be a lot of research going on trying to determine the particulars so we can learn to predict what this fungus will do for us," said Tim Tignor, a Virginia Department of Forestry forest health specialist. "It holds out the promise of making our future gypsy moth problems less severe than they have been for the past 10 years." Gypsy moth caterpillars usually show up in May. "They've caused hundreds of thousands of acres of complete defol...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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